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Full text of "Haverford College Bulletin, New Series, 44-45, 1945-1947"

CLASS I L) cL^OCp book Ju J 

V. 44-^5 
THE LIBRARY 

OF 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



ACCESS I 



THE GIFT OF 

HAVERFORD OO LLEOE 

ONNO.TT5\20 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/haverfordcollege4445have 



H'. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1945 - 1946 



No). XLV. DIRECTORY Mo. 1 

FACULTY AND STAFF 



' 


Residence 


Telephone 






Haverford, unless 


Ardmore, unless 


Name 


otherwise noted 


otherwise noted Office 


(B.M. 


=Bryn Mawr, H.C.=Haverford Coll.) 




Allendoerfer, Carl B. 


750 Rugby Rd., B.M. 


B.M.2568 J 


Founders, 
Center West 


Asensio, Manuel J. 


2 College Lane 


4163 


Founders, West 


Beard, Mabel S. 


Infirmary, HC. 


3036 


Infirmary 


Benham, Thomas A. 


3 College Lane 


6044 


Sharpless 14 


Brinton, Howard H. 


Plushmill Rd., 








Wallingford 


Media 4057 




Cadbury, William E., Jr. 


791 College Ave. 


0203 W 


Chem. Lab. 22 


Caselll, Aldo 


Merlon Hall, H.C. 


5562 


Roberts, 1st fl. 


Comfort, Howard 


5 College Circle 


3732 


SharplesB 40 


Comfort, William W. 


South Walton Rd. 


0455 




Cooper, Bennett S. 


521 Panmure Rd. 


3254 M 


Founders, East 


Docherty, William, Jr. 


747 Church Lane, 








Yeadon 




Gymnasium 


Drake, Thomas E. 


702 Pennstone Rd., 




Library, 


■ 


B.M. 


B.M. 1534 


Treasure Room 


' Dunn, Emmett R. 


748 Rugby Rd., B.M. 


B.M.2753 


Sharpless 39 


Evans, Arlington 


324 Boulevard, 


Hilltop 






Brookline, Upper Darby 2043 


Gymnasium 


Evans, Francis Cope 


1 College Lane 


4049 W 


Sharpless 32 


Fetter, Frank W. * 






Whitall 9 


FitzGerald, Alan S. 


Warick Rd. and 
Cotswold Land, 








Wynnewood 


1404 


Sharpless 9 


Flight, John W. * 


753 College Ave. 


4409 W 


Sharpless 42 


Foss, Martin 


la College Lane 


1599 


Library 49 


Green, Louis C. ** 


791 College Ave. 


4409 J 


Observatory 


Haddleton, Alfred W. 


29 Tenmore Rd. 


B.M.1235 W 


Gymnasium 


Henry, Howard K. 


1464 Drayton Lane, 








Penn Wynne 


3913 J 


Sharpless 31 


Herndon, John G. 


1 College Lane 


0364 


Library 2 


Hetzel, Theodore B. ** 


768 College Ave. 


4393 W 


Hilles, 2nd fl. 


Hoag, Gilbert T. 


Woodside, H.C. 


1402 W 


Roberts, 2nd fl. 


Holmes, Clayton W. 


720 Millbrook Lane 


4269 W 


Hilles, 1st fl. 


Jones, Rufus M. 


2 College Circle 


2777 




Jones, Thomas O. * 






Chem. Lab. 6 


Kelly, John A. 


3 College Lane 


4160 


Whitall 11 


Klatt, Mrs. Mabel H. 


Founders Hall, H.C. 


9533 


Founders, 
Dining Room 


Lockwood, Dean P. 


6 College Circle 


1402 J 


Library 


Lunt, William E. 


5 College Lane 


1507 W 


Whitall 10 


Macintosh, Archibald 


3 College Circle 


0961 


Roberts, 2nci fl. 


Meldrum, William B. 


747 College Ave. 


0881 J 


Chem. Lab. 10 


Oakley, Cletus O. 


Featherbed Lane 


3109 W 




Palmer, Frederic, Jr. 


1 College Lane 


6878 


Founders, 
Center East 


Pepinsky, Abraham 


7 College Lane 


5324 


Sharpless 21 


Pfund, Harry W. 


624 Overhill Rd., 








Ardmore 


5532 


Whitall 8 



C«,3<. 



LocKe<^ 



5^ 









V' ^^ -^S 




Residence 


Telephone 






Haverford, unless 


Ardmore, unless 




Name 


otherwise noted 


otherwise noted 


Office 


Post, Amy L. 


C-3 Dreycott Apts. 


1643 M 


Library 28 


Post, L. Arnold 


9 College Lane 


0258 M 


Library 51 


Randall, Roy E. 






Gymnasium 


Rantz, J. Otto 


2122 Chestnut Ave., 








Ardmore 




Hilles, Lab.fl. 


Reid, Legh W. 


Merion Hall, H.C. 


1742 




Rittenhouse, Leon H. 


6 College Lane 


5522 




Sargent, Ralph M. 


4 College Circle 


3339 


Whitall 7 


Snyder, Edward D. ** 


36 Railroad Ave. 


0712 


Whitall 12 


Spaeth, J. Duncan 


Upper Gulph Rd., 


Wayne 






Wayne 


2244 


Whitall 14 


Steere, Douglas V. 


739 College Ave. 


0162 


Whitall 3 


Stinnes, Edmund H. 


751 Millbrook Lane 


6759 




Sutton, Richard M. 


785 College Ave., 








facing Walton Rd. 


0742 W 


Sharpless 17 


Swan, Alfred 


624 Overhill Rd., 








Ardmore 


5532 


Union,Music 
Room 


Taylor, Dr. Herbert W. 


457 Lancaster Ave. 


2383 


Infirmary 


Teaf, Howard M., Jr. 


3 College Lane 


4049 J 


Whitall 9 


Watson, Frank D. 


773 College Ave. 


2937 


Whitall 6 


Williamson, A. Jardlne ** 


4 College Lane 


4023 




Wilson, Albert H. 


765 College Ave. 


1853 




Wylie, Laurence W. 


Gov't House, H.C. 


9461 


Founders, West 



♦Indicates absence during first semester. 

*♦ Indicates absence during whole academic year. 



COLLEGE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

When there is an operator at the switchboard (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, 9: 00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, none Sunday) any of the offices 
listed below can be reached by calling Ardmore 6400. 

When there is no operator on duty, use the following telephone number: 

Ardmore 0767 Library; Maintenance and Operation Office 

Ardmore 0221 Dean; Comptroller 

Ardmore 0763 Hilles Laboratory; Physics Laboratory 

Ardmore 3036 Infirmary 

Ardmore 3761 President's Office 



FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONES 

The offices of most of the members of the Faculty may be reached by calling 
Ardmore 6400 during the hours when there is an operator at the switchboard. 






COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Unless otherwise noted, all telephones below may be reached 
by calling Ardmore 6400 

Acting President, Archibald Macintosh 
Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 
Alumni Office, Bennett S. Cooper, Secretary 
Assistant to the President, Bennett S. Cooper 

Barclay Hall, North (Pay Station) 9506 

Barclay Hall, Center (Pay Station) 9459 

Barclay Hall, South (Pay Station) 9508 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 
Business Office, Aldo Caselli, Comptroller 
Chemistry Laboratory 
Dean's Office, Gilbert T. Hoag, Dean 
Dietitian, Mrs. Mabel H. Klatt 
Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 

Founders Hall, East (Pay Station) 9460 

Founders Hall, Dormitory (Pay Station) 9533 

French Department Office 

Government House, 8 College Lane (Pay Station) 9613 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) 9512 

Gymnasium Office 

Haverford News 4894 

Haverford Review, Bennett S. Cooper, Managing Editor 
Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering) 
Infirmary, Mabel S. Beard, R.N. 

Kitchen (Pay Station) 9544 

Language House, Manuel J. Asensio, Director (Pay Station) 9428 

Library: D.P. Lockwood, Librarian 

Amy L. Post, Assistant Librarian 

Circulation Desk 

Treasure Room: Thos. E. Drake. Anna B. Hewitt 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) Rooms 1-12 (Pay Station) 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbrldge) Rooms 13-26 (Pay Station) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) Rooms 27-38 (Pay Station) 9628 

Maintenance and Operation Office 

Merlon Hall 9458 

Observatory 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Power House (Pay Station) 9540 

Radio Room 5042 

Registrar's Office 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Romance Language Department Office 

Sharpless Hall: T. A. Benham, H. Comfort, F, C. Evans, H. K. Henry, 

A. Peplnsky, R. M. Sutton 
Whltall Hall: J. W. Flight, J. A. Kelly, H. W. Pfund, E. D. Snyder 



DIRECTORY 

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory room; F for 
Founders Hall, L for Lloyd Hall, Be for Barclay Center, Bn for Barclay North. The 
figure following the name indicates the number of the term now being completed. 
Day students' home telephones are listed beneath their addresses. 

Name Home Address 

ADAMS, James Fowler, Jr., 6 

2900 Harrison Street, Wilmington 270, Del. 
ALENICK, Monroe Edward, 5 

292 Eastern Parkway, Newark 6, N. J. 
ALLINSON, Andrew Prevost 

Town's End Farm, West Chester, Pa. 
ALLYN, Herman Bryden, II, 1 

10 State Street, Framingham Centre, Mass. 

BAKER, William Perrin, Jr., 2 

355 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton, Pa. 
BALDI, Virgil Bismarck, Jr., 2 

437 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BARKER, William Pierson, II, 5 

1553 Shorb Avenue, N.W., Canton 3, Ohio 
BARRAZA: Carlos, 1 

Donato Guerra 315 S, Torreon, Coah, Mexico 
BECK, Stuart Morgan, 1 

3900 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington 16, D.C. 
BEHRENS, Robert H., 

4042 Walnut St, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Evergreen 3827 
BELL, William Warren, 5 

4409 Greenwich Parkway, N.W., Washington 7, D.C. 
BESSE, Byron Earl, 4 

823 Old Gulph Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
BIRDSALL, Joseph Cooper, Jr., 4 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
BLECKER, Solomon, 5 

5022 N. 10th Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. 
BOGFR, John Neil, 1 

J41 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 
BOUZARTH, William Francis, II, 5 

635 Belair Avenue, Aberdeen, Md. 
BRENES, Luis Guillermo, 1 

San Jose, Costa Rica 
BRIEGER, Henry Arthur Nicholas, 3 

58 N. Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
BRODHEAD, Charles Daniel, 1 

621 Rising Sun Avenue, Philadelphia 40, Pa. 
BROWNLEE, John Erskine, 1 

6531 Holmes Street, Kansas City 5, Mo. 



College Address 


26 L 


37 L 


59 Bn 


63 Bn 


23 L 


21 F 


21 L 


70 Bn 


14 L 


Day 


25 L 


Day 


29 L 


38 L 


69 Bn 


22 L 


67 Bn 


15 F 


10 F 


68 Bn 



5 

Name Home Address College Address 

BRUCKNER, Robert J., 1 Day 

911 Kenmore Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BUTTRICK, David Gardner, 3 26 Be 

21 E. 79th Street, New York, N.Y. 

CARROLL, John MacGregor, 1 58 Bn 

468 Riverside Drive, New York City 
CLAYTON, Robert Francis, Jr., 6 1 L 

49 E. Providence Road, Lansdowne, Pa. 
CLEWS, Margaret, Special Student Day 

Dorset Road, Devon, Pa. 
CLEWS, M. Madison, Special Student Day 

Dorset Road, Devpn, Pa. 
COATES, George Morrison, 2 nd, Special Student Day 

Paoli, Pa. 
COHEN, Walter Leo, Special Student 24 F 

73 E. Market St., Long Beach, L.I., N.Y. 
COLLINS, Benjamin McVickar, 3 32 L 

Broadlea Farm, Rhinebeck, New York 
COOPER, Nathaniel Fenimore, 1 13 L 

453 N. Highland Avenue, Merion, Pa. 
COUCH, Richard Arden, 2 12 F 

601 Clearview Avenue, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 
CULBERT, Craig Dunlap, 3 Day 

26 Chatham Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
CUMBEE, H. Wayne, 2 5L 

2430 Boulevard Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

DALLETT, Francis James, Jr., 1 Day 

324 Overhill Road, Wayne, Pa. 

Wayne 2392 
DAVIES, David Elwyn, 2 

3012 - 44th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
DAVIS, Francis A., Jr., 2 

304 Somerset Road, Baltimore 70, Md. 
DAVIS, John Oilman, 1 

76 Brooks Street, West Medford, Mass. 
DE MARCO, Michael Charles, 2 

7201 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia 26, Pa. 
DINKER, William Richard, 

12 N. Portland Avenue, Ventnor, N.J. 
DISBROW, Donald Willis, 1 

R. D. 3, Dundee, New York 
DORN, Richard Kenneth, 4 

6140 Nassau Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
DVORKEN, Henry Jacob, 2 

435 W. Fifth Avenue, Roselle, N. J. 

ECHIKSON, Edward, 1 

31 Midland Blvd., Maplewood, N.J. 
EDGERTON, Charles Willis, Jr., 3 

College Avenue, Haver ford. Pa. 
EDGERTON, Robert, 2 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
EISELE, George William, 1 

(404 Center Street, Westmont, N.J.) 

1438 Westwood Lane, Overbrook Hills, Pa. 



11 F 


29 L 


15 L 


Day 


9 F 


56 Bn 


19 L 


13 F 


33 L 


30 L 


10 L 


Day 



Name 



Home Address 



College Address 



ESHLEMAN, Benjamin, Jr., 1 

Mountpleasant Road, Villa Nova, Pa. 

EWELL, Albert Hunter, Jr., 8 

4937 Walton Avenue, Philadelphia 43, Pa. 

EXTON, Frederick, Jr., 2 

4519 Davenport St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 

FALTERMAYER, Edmund Kase, 2 

46 E. Gowen Avenue, Mr. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FEROE, Barton Kenneth, 5 

213 Marlboro Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
FINCH, George Frank, Jr. 1 

509 E. Mt. Airy Ave. Phila. 19, Pa. 
FREEMAN, Murray Fox, 5 

324 N. Bowman Avenue, Merion, Pa. 

Merion 1198 

GANTER, Robert Lewis, 3 

830 Elsinore Place, Chester, Pa. 
GARDNER, Kenneth Adelman, 2 

2214 Forest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
GEBHARDT, John Frank, 2 

140 E. 29th Street, Erie, Pa. 
GERLACH, Thomas Bradfield, 1 

1526 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GIFFORD, Thomas, 1 

468 Hope Street, Providence 6, R.l. 
GOODMAN, I. Robert, 2 

3749 Nortonia Road, Baltimore 16, Md. 
GOULD, Stanley Benton, 2 

3505 Edgewood Road, Baltimore, Md. 

HAMILTON, Richard Truitt, 6 

Rosslyn Farms, Carnegie, Pa. 
HAMMOND, Stanley George, 2 

104 Park Road, Llanerch, Pa. 
HAND, Thomas Spencer, 1 

1 Holmcrest Rd. Jenkintown, Pa. 
HANDRICH, Paul Charles, 1 

48 Colonial Road, Bellerose, L.I., N.Y. 
HARDEN, Robert Schermerhorn, 3 

341 E. Main St.,Moorestown, N.J. 
HARPER, Robert, 2 

190 Crowell Avenue, Staten Island, N.Y. 
HARRIS, Margaret G. Special Student 

774 Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
HARRIS, William Hamilton, 5 

204 N. 17th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
HARRIS, William Macy, 7 

774 Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
HARVEY, Randolph Charles, 4 

112 Chamounix Road, St. Davids, Pa. 
HASTINGS, David Spencer, 1 

79 Connecticut Avenue, Kensington, Md. 
HASTINGS, James Babbitt, 2 

30 Elston Road, Upper Montclair, N.J. 
HA USER, John Norman, 3 

7443 Oakhill Avenue, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 



27 L 



38 L 



7 L 



9 L 


Day 


31 Be 


Day 


30 Be 


12 L 


35 L 


72 Bn 


50 Bn 


11 L 


11 L 


2 L 


34 Be 


54 Bn 


68 Bn 


30 L 


8 L 


Day 


34 L 


Day 


2 L 


69 Bn 


10 L 


24 L 



Name 



Home Address 



College Address 



HAZELWOOD, Robert Nochols, 2 

3405 N. Hackett Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wisconsin 
HENNE, John Kraffert, 6 

332 W. Oak Street,. Titusvllle, Pa. 
HERTER, Theophilus John, Graduate Student 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. 
HIGINBOTHOM, William Curran, 3 

5403 Springlake Way, Baltimore, Md. 
HOLLINGSHEAD, Irving, Jr., 1 

309 Chestnut Street, Moorestown, N.J. 
HOOPES, John Robison, Jr., 3 

5500 Moorland Lane, Bethesda, Md. 
HOSKINS, Robert Graham, 2 

86 Barick Road, Waban 68, Mass. 
HOWE, Gerald Shropshire, 

Detachment VII Corps, Camp San Luis Obispo, Calif. 
HUEBSCH, Ian, 6 

285 Central Park, West, New York 24, N.Y. 

JACKSON, John Albert, 2 

20 Summer Street, Adams, Mass. 
JACOB, James Archibald, Jr., 4 

1310 Pleasant Avenue, Wellsburg, W. Va. 
JACOBS, George Wayne, Jr., 6 

The Kingsway, Bloomingdale Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 
JOHNSON, David, 7 

18 W. 122nd Street, New York, N.Y. 
JOHNSON, James Dexter, 2 

250 S. Brentwood, Clayton, Mo. 
JOHNSON, Richard Schaper, 3 

328 W. 22nd St., Erie, Pa. 
JOHNSON, Victor Lawrence, 1 

1007 Valley Road, Melrose Park, Pa. 
JOHNSTON, Robert James, Jr., 2 

Merion Hall, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 
JONES, Corson, 

9 Hesketh Street, Chevy Chase, Md. 
JONES, Evan Gordon Newton, 1 

Hectors River P.O., Jamaica, B.W.L 

KATCHEN, Julius, 8 

2 Hollywood Avenue, W. Long Branch, N.J. 
KATO, Walter Yoneo, 7 

5210 Winthrop Avenue, Chicago 40, 111. 
KEETZ, Francis A., 1 

Hilldale Road, Villa Nova, Pa. 
KELLY, Paul Sherwood, 1 

118 W. 36th Street, Erie, Pa. 
KINDLER, Don, 3 

Jessups, Md. 

LAITY, Walter Asbury, 1 

105 Elliott Place, East Orange, N.J. 
LAMBERT, Richard Meredith, 2 

104 Webster Avenue, Wyncote, Pa. 
LASDAY, Harrison Robert, 1 

1322 Sq. Hill Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
LASH, William Stanley Mallory, 1 

R.R. 1, Fonthill, Ontario, Canada 
LEAMAN, Arthur, 4 

40 Fifth Avenue, Apt. 7D, New York City 



8L 


32 L 


Day 


25 L 


50 Bn 


26 Be 


14 F 


28 L 


7b F 


5F 


21 L 


27 L 


3 L 


5L 


31 L 


13 L 


Day 


28 Be 


20 F 


20 L 


21b F 


Day 


15 L 


18 L 


58 Bn 


22 F 


60 Bn 


8F 


30 F 



1 L 


18 L 


9 L 


53 Bn 


Day 



Name Home Address College Address 

LEUCHTER, Ben Zion 

East Park Avenue, Vineland, N.J. 
LEVINSON, Henry Walter, 3 

4724 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
LIBBY, Ed^ward Kelway, 2 

1324 Euclid Street, N.W., Washington 9, D.C. 
LIMBER, Wayne Stevenson, L 

166 Elm Street, Montpelier, Vt. 
LONGSTRETH, Frank Hoover, Graduate Student 

31 Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 9658 
LONGSTRETH, Martha Comfort, Special Student Day 

31 Railroad Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

MALEY, Eugene Pat, 9 F 

1414 Regina Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
MARVIN, John Howell Williams, 1 67 Bn 

100 Park Place, Kingston, Pa. 
MATHIAS, Edward Trail, 1 51 Bn 

103 Council Street, Frederick, Md. 
MATLACK, Charles William, 59 Bn 

King s Highway, Moorestown, N.J. 
MC GUIRE, Charles Robison, 1 36 Be 

3310 Warrington Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
MEAD, Brian, Jr., 5 34 L 

11 Horseguard Lane, Scarsdale, N.Y. 
MILLER, Bruce Marten, 5 35 L 

c/o Ward, 1608 Upshur, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
MILLER, James Quinter, 1 60 Bn 

10 Manor Drive, Tuckahoe 7, N.Y. 
MILLER, Stephen Raben, 1 61 Bn 

1501 Undercllff Avenue, Bronx 53, N.Y. 
MOORE, Charles Byrd, 3 6 L 

25 Amherst Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 
MORRIS, Robert Lee, 1 66 Bn 

90 Oakwood Avenue, Long Branch, N.J. 
MOSES, Charles Henry Mann, Jr., 5 Day 

433 Haverford Road, Wynnewood, Pa. 

Ardmore 4396 

NAMY, Claude A., 1 6 F 

97 Brd. de la Resistance, Casablanca, Morocco 
NEWMAN, Paul Freedman, 4 22 L 

7 Balfour Circle, Lansdowne, Pa. 
NEYERLIN, John Thomas Language House 

NICKLIN, George Leslie, Jr., 2 ^ 17 F 

Alden Park Manor, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 

OBERHOLTZER, Wendell Woodward Day 

Mont Clare, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
OLIVIER, Daniel Dretzka, 4 33 Be 

Box 306, R. D. 2, PhoenixvlUe, Pa. 
OSWALD, David Statton, 4 37 L 

826 The Terrace, Hagerstown, Md. 

PARKE, Robert Gerber, 1 52 Bn 

20 Cornell Place, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 
PAYRO, Roberto Pablo, 8 3 L 

Lavalle 357, Buenos Aires, Argentina 



Name 



Home Address 



College Address 



PETERS, David Alexander,. 5 

45 N. nth Street, Allentown, Pa. 
PETERSEN, Hans Eberhard, 7 

145 95th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
POST, Arnold Rae, 7 

9 College Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

QUEK, Soo Tong, 2 

115 W. 73rd Street, New York City 

RAMIREZ, Rafael Roberto, Jr., Special Student 

Box 205, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 
REYNOLDS, Edward Allan, 1 

111 Spring Avenue, Chestertown, Md. 
REYNOLDS, James Conrad, 2 

208 W. State Street, Kennett Square, Pa. 
RICHIE, Douglas Hooten, 2 

8 N. Main Street, Brewster, N.Y. 
RIVERS, Richard D., 7 

1281 Everett Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 
ROBINSON, Richard Edward, 1 

San Ignacio #22, Altos, Havana, Cuba 
ROCHE, Robert Pearson, 8 

111 - 7th Street, Garden City, N.Y. 
ROGERS, Alan Spencer, 7 

Woodside Cottage, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 
RUFF, George Elson, Jr., 2 

7358 Rural Lane, Philadelphia 19, Pa. 

SCHUMAN, Richard Waldron, 3 

2210 Forrest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
SETTLE, Lyle G., 5 

Dryden, N.Y. 
SHAKESPEARE, Edward Oram, 1 

482 Sabine Avenue, Wynnewood, Pa. 
SHEPARD, Royal Francis, Jr., 2 

128 N. Mountain Avenue, Montclair, N.J. 
SINGER, Ellis Paul, 1 

139 Tuscan Road, Maplewood, N.J. 
SNODGRASS, Francis Mattlage, 1 

Windfall, R. D. 1, Martinsburg, W. Va . 
SPROULE, Joseph, 

College Avenue & Darby Road 

Haverford, Pa. 
STEEFEL, Lawrence, D., Jr., 7 

430 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 1179W 
STEERE, Paul Winsor 

Marquette, Michigan 
STERN, Thomas Louis, 1 

88-10 Whithey Ave, Elmhurst, L. I., N.Y. 
STEWART, David William, II, 1 

117 St. Paul's Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
STONE, John Alexander, 4 

319 W. 88th Street, Apartment 8, New York, N.Y. 
STURR, George Bowler TuUidge, 7 

129 Fourth Avenue, Haddon Heights, N.J. 
SWARTLEY, William Moyer, 3 

Woodland Drive, Lansdale, Pa. 



23 L 
7a F 
Day 

4 L 



71 Bn 


2 F 


16 L 


22 F 


33 Be 


52 Bn 


1 L 


Day 


36 L 


31 L 


54 F 


36 L 


33 L 


5 L 



Day 

6 L 
66 Bn 
Day 
26 L 
17 L 
24 L 



10 



Name 



Home Address 



TAGGART, George Webster, 3 

1245 E. Broad Street, Hazleton, Pa. 
THOMAS, David Edward, 4 

518 Foss Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
THOMPSON, Daniel Bard, 6 

110 S. Broad Street, Waynesboro, Pa. 
THORPE, James Hancock, 1 

Apt. A.I., 7910-19th Rd., Jackson Heights, L. I., N.Y. 
TODD, John Arnold, 1 

Serpentine Lane, Wyncott, Pa. 
TOLAN, David John, 1 

2951 N. Marietta Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wisconsin 
TURNER, Conrad William, 1 

307 Hamilton Road, Wynnewood, Pa. 
TYCHANICH, John Dimitri, 2 

53 Balmforth Avenue, Danbury, Conn. 

VAUGHAN, Clark A., 2 

Gate House, Milton Academy, Milton 86, Mass. 
VEDOVA, Harold Frederick, 3 

1463 Hampstead Road, Penn Wynne, Philadelphia 31, Pa. 

WAGNER, Daniel Hobson, 6 

10 Conestoga Road, Berwyn, Pa. 



College Address 


17 L 


19 L 


21 L 


53 Bn 


21 F 


61 Bn 


51 Bn 


12 L 


30 Be 


Day 



28 Be 



WHITE, Robert Phillips, 

301 Brookllne Court Apts., Brookline, Upper Darby, Pa. 
WHITEHEAD, Herbert Macy, 8 

R. D. #1, South Windham, Maine 
WHITMAN, John Turner, 4 

Nashawtuc Hill, Concord, Mass. 
WIDMER, Robert J., Special Student 

768 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
WILCOX, John Rogers, 2 

127 South West Street, Allentown, Pa. 
WINDER, Richard Bayly, IV 

5908 Cedar Parkway, Chevy Chase, Md. 
WIRES, John Stanley, 6 

45 Windsor Road, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
WRIGHT, Theodore Craig, 2 

107 Lee Avenue, Trenton, N.J. 

YAMANE, George Mitsuyoshi, 7 

T-34-B, P.O. Box 788, Crystal City, Texas 

ZWEIFLER, Nathan Joseph, 5 

46 Wilbur Avenue, Newark 8, N.J. 



36 Be 
30 F 
20 L 
Day 
16 L 

3 F 

4 F 
8 F 

4 L 

22 L 



11 



RECONSTRUCTION & RELIEF TRAINING UNIT 



DOUGLAS, Deborah Adams (A.B., Sweet Brair, 1943) Government House 

704 East 44th Street, Savannah, Ga. 
ELLIOTT, Rosalie Calhoun, (B.A., Mt. Holyoke, 1945) Day 

(c/o J. D. Allen) 27 Tenmore Road, Haverford, Pa. 

(418 Belvedere Street, La Jolla, California) 
FEISE, Dorelen (B.A., Oberlln, 1944) Government House 

401 Rosebank Avenue, Baltimore 12, Md. 
GRAHAM, Carolyn (B.A., H. Sophie Newcomb, 1944) Government House 

7821 Freret Street, New Orleans 18, La. 
HOVEY, Sarah Edith (A.B., Reed, 1944) Day 

c/o Dr. H. Comfort, 5 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

(833 34th Avenue, N., Seattle 2, Washington) 
KNIGHT, Bernlce Eva (B.A., Colby, 1944) Government House 

County Road, Westbrook, Maine 
LITCHMAN, Jean Marx (A.B., University of Washington, 1943) Government House 

408 E. 50th Street, Seattle 5, Washington 
POHL, Claudlne Blanche (A.B., Oberlln, 1944) Government House 

215 West 83rd Street, New York 24, N.Y. 
RUSSELL, Florence O. (A.B., Scrlpps, 1944) Government House 

1811 El Encanto Road, Santa Barbara, California 
SHORTER, Fred Claiborne (A.B., Reed, 1944) 1 F 

3208 Franklin Avenue, Seattle 2, Washington 
WALTEN, Constance (B.A., Vassar, 1944) Government House 

6318'Mossway, Baltimore 12, Md. 
WILHELM, Frederick Oscar (B.A., Wesleyan, 1944) 23 F 

Box 35, North Granby, Conn. 
WOLTER, Rebecca Sturtevant (B.A., Carleton, 1943) Government House 

75 W. Division Street, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 
WYLIE, Anne Stiles (Mrs. Laurence W.) (B.S., Simmons, 1943) Government House 

8 College Lane, Haverford, Pa. 



- 


i[n»ii[e 



- 



Report of 

TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER OF THE 
CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

1944-1945 




VOLUME XL IV 



NOVEMBER 
1945 



NUMBER TWO 



Issued October, November, December and February by 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 



SeDcwwl Oas« Permit Applied For 



HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



Report of 

TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER OF THE 
CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

For the Year Ending Ei^th Month 31, 1945 




HAVERFORD -PENNSYLVANIA 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
Officers 

DR. S. EMLEN STOKES, President Moorestown. N, J. ^ 

ARCHIBALD MACINTOSH, Acting President of the 

College Hoverf ord .Pa. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St. , Phila. 3 

JOHN F. GUMMERE, Secretary W. School Lone and Fox St., Phila. 44 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 

Term Expires 1946 

HARRIS G. HAVILAND 16th and Parkway, Phila. 3 

ARCHIBALD MACINTOSH 3 College Circle, Haver ford. Pa. 

JONATHAN M. STEERE 1318 Girord Trust Bldg. , Hiila. 2 

Term Expires 1947 

STANLEY R. YARNALL 5337 Knox St . . Hiila. 44 

IRVIN C. FOLEY 6012 Chew St . , Phila. 38 

ARTHUR J. PHILLIPS 274 S- Felton St., Riila. 39 

Term Expires 1948 

HENRY C. EVANS 635 Manatawna Ave. , Phila. , 28 

WILMOT R. JONES Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

RICHARD M. SUTTON 785 College Ave . , Hover ford. Pa. 



^MORRIS E, LEEDS, President - Resigned at expiration of term. 

tenth month 1945 . 
2 
FELIX M. MORLEY, President of the College - Resigned ninth 

month 1945. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 
Ex-officio as Officers of Ccx^porat ion 

DR. S. EMLEN STOKES, President Moorestown, N. J. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St.. Phila. 3 

JOHN F. GUMMERE, Secretary. W. School Lane and Fox St., Phila- 44 

Term Expires 1946 

FREDERIC H. STRAWBRIDGE 801 Market St . . Phila. 7 

JONATHAN M. STEERE 1318 Girard Trust Bldg. . Phila. 2 

L. HOLLINGSWORTH WOOD 103 Park Ave.. New York. N. Y. 

STANLEY R. YARNALL 5337 Knox St ., Phila. 44 

WILLIAM W. COMFC«T Haver ford. Pa. 

DR. HENRY M. THOMAS, JR .^ 314 Overhill Rd . . Baltimore 10. Md . 

ALEXANDER C, WOOD, JR 325 Chestnut St . . Phila. 6 

HAROLD EVANS 1000 Provident Trust Bldg.. Phila. 3 

Term Expires 1947 

J . STOGDELL STOKES Summerdale . Phila . . 24 

M. ALBERT LINTON 460 1 Market St . . Phila. 39 

FRANCIS R. TAYLOR 910 Girard Trust Bldg.. Phila- 2 

EDWARD WOOLMAN Haverford. Pa. 

THOMAS W. ELKINTON 121 S. 3rd St.. Phila. 6 

MORRIS E. LEEDS 4901 Stenton Ave.. Phila., 44 

HENRY C. EVANS 635 Manatawna Ave.. Phila- 28 

WILLIAM M. MAIER Bailey Building. Phila. 7 

Term Expires 1948 

CHARLES J. RHOADS Ithan Rd . . Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

EDWARD W. EVANS 304 Arch St., Phila.. 6 

WILLIAM A. BATTEY Liberty Trust Bldg.. Phila. 7 

DR. FREDERIC C. SHARPLESS Rosemont, Pa- 

ALFRED BUSSELLE 220 E. 36th St.. New York. N. Y. 

JOHN A. SILVER Tabor Rd . and E. Adans Ave. Phila. 20 

WILLIAM B. BELL Rockefeller Plaza, New York. N. Y. 

WILMOT R. JONES Alapocas Drive, Wilaington, Del. 

Alumni Representatives 
W. NELSON WEST, III, Term Expires 1946.1411 Walnut St., Phila. 2 
J. COLVIN WRIGHT, Term £xpire« i 947. .116 E. Penn St., Bedford. Pa- 
PAUL V. R. MILLER. Term Expires 1948. 1700 Girard Trust Bldq- . Phila- 2 
CHARLES S. R I STINE, 2 Term Expires 1945 -Fidelity-Phila. Trust Bldg, .Phila. 9 

Faculty Representatives 
Term Expires 1946 Term Expires 1947 

FRANK D. WATSON RICHARD M. SUTTCW 

Alternates, 1945-46: HOWARD M. TEAF and RALPH M. SARGENT 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

S. EMLEN STCKES W. NELSON WEST, III 



^In U. S. Service 



^OWEN B. RHOADS, Retired at Expiration of Term, Tenth Month 1945. 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers of 
THE Corporation of Haverford College 
The Chairman of the Board is an 
ex -of fie io member of all Committees . 

Execut ive Cornmit tee 



J. STOGDELL STOKES, Chairman THOMAS W. ELKINTON 

J, HENRY SCATTERGOOD PAUL V. R. MILLER 

JCMVATHAN M. STEERE EDWARD W, EVANS ^ 



ALEXANDER C. WOOD JR. MORRIS E. LEEDS ^ 

FREDERIC C. SHARPLESS W. NELSON WEST III 

Commit tee on Finance and Investments 

JC»JATHAN M. STEERE, Chairman M, ALBERT LINTCW 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD WILLIAM B. BELL 

ALEXANDER C. WOOD JR. 

Committee on College Property and Farm 

HENRY C. EVANS, Chairman EDWARD W. W0C«,MAN 

FREDERIC H. STRAWBRIDGE ALFRED BUSSELLE 

THOMAS W. ELKINTCM* WILLIAM M. MAIER 

WILLIAM A, BATTEY OWEN B. RHOADS^ 

JOHN A. SILVER 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 

WILLIAM WISTAR COMFORT, Chairman 
L. HOLLINGSWORTH WOOD^ STANLEY R, YARNALL 

HENRY M, THOMAS FRANCIS R, TAYLOR 

M. ALBERT LINTON 

Library Committee 

WILLIAM WISTAR COMFCKT L. HOLLINGSWORTH WOOD 

HAROLD EVANS WILMOT R. JONES 

Counsel 

MACCOY, BRITTAIN, EVANS, AND LEWIS 
1632 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



Term Expired: Tenth Month 1945 
^Term Began: Tenth Month 1945 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



ARCHIBALD MACINTOSH 

A.B., Haver ford College; M.A., Columbia University 

Acting President 

GILBERT THOMAS HOAG 
A.B., Haver ford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Dean 

ALDO CASELLI 

D.S.E. and C., University of Naples 

Comptroller 

DEAN PUTNAM LOCKWOOD 
A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Librarian 

HERBERT WILLIAM TAYLOR 
A .B . , Haver ford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Physician in Charge 

LOUIS CRAIG GREEN* 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

THOMAS EDWARD DRAKE 

A.B ., Stanford University ; M.A., University of Michigan ; Ph.D . . Yale Univ . 

Qjrator of the Quaker Collection 

BENNETT S MEDLEY COOPER 

B.S., Haver ford College 

Alumni Secretary and Assistant to the President 

MRS. ETHEL ELIZABETH BEATTY 
Dietician 

AMY LYDIA POST 
A.B., Earlham College 
Assistant Librarian 

MABEL SYLVIA BEARD 
R.N. , Lankenau Hospital 
Resident Nurse 

ALICE LOUELLA MATT SON 
Secretary to the President 

GERTRUDE MANN WON SON 
B.S., Simmons College 

Admissions Office 



♦ Absent on leave, 1945-46. 



SUMMARY OF THE ACCOUNT 

OF 

THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

OF 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, TREASURER 
ALDO CASELLI, COMPTROLLER 

For the Year Ending Eighth Month 31, 1945 

RECEIPTS 

Income From Funds For General Purposes 

General Endowment Fund $ 5,054.24 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 721.67 

John M. Whitall Fund 552.69 

David Scull Fund 2,327.44 

Edward L. Scull Fund 590.31 

Wistar Morris Memorial Fund 267.21 

Israel Franklin Whitall Fund 560.06 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 67,598.98 

John Farnum Brown Fund 14,331.42 

Ellen Wain Fund 577.47 

Clementine Cope Endowment Fund 1,116.47 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 138.25 

Joseph E. Gillingham Fund 2,202.16 

Henry Norris Fund 305.74 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 508.16 

James R. Magee Fund 2,322.57 

Albert K. Smiley Fund 77.92 

Hlnchman Astronomical Fund 2,052.60 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund 9,067.40 

Albin Garrett Memorial Fund 1,390.60 

Arnold Chase Scattergood Memorial Fund 1,266.48 

Frances B. Gummere Memorial Fund 6,522.61 

Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund 11,361.70 

General Education Board Fund 6,548.97 

William Penn Foundation 5,301.82 

Walter Carrol Brinton Memorial Fund 733.75 

Corporation Fund 4,156.06 

Elizabeth J. Shortridge Fund 519.44 

Howard Comfort Memorial Fund 261.14 

Emma Ridgway Comly Fund 2,596.56 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund 5,599.93 

Albert L. Bally Fund 259.72 

Elizabeth B. Wistar Warner Fund 257.12 

T. Allen Hilles Bequest 14,584.10 

Leonard L. Grief & Roger L. Grief Fund 51.94 

Edward M. Wistar Fund 129.86 

Morris E. Leeds Fund 2,125.58 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund 106.71 

Forward $174,146.85 



Forward $174,146.85 

Income From Fund for T. Wistar Brown 
Graduate Schoo l 

Moses Brown Fund 18,473.44 

Income From Funds for Morris Infirmary 

Infirmary Endowment Fund 501.44 

John W. Pinkham Fund 262.81 764.25 

Income From Fund for Haverford Union 

Haverford Union Fund 97.59 

Income From Funds for Scholarships 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 273.11 

Edward Yarnall Fund 315.26 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 1,029.40 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund 262.64 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 364.32 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 411.39 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 1,186.71 

Isaac Thome Johnson Scholarship Fund 440.45 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 153.30 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 267.82 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund 259.72 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund 262.09 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund 888.45 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 260.62 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 155.83 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 173.96 

Daniel B. Smith Fund 168.47 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund 4,072.04 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 287.27 11,232.85 

Income From Funds for Library 

Alumni Library Fund 905.65 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 3,490.48 

William H. Jenks Library Funds 259.72 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund 1,054.82 

Anna Yarnall Fund 8,914.61 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund 33.01 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial Fund 52.07 

Class of 1888 Library Fund 322.08 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 65.11 15,097.55 

Income From Funds for Old Style Pensions 

President Sharpless Fund 2,142.03 

William P. Henzey Fund 1,909.40 

Jacob P. Jones Benefit Fund 3,538.12 

Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund 169.97 

Haverford College Pension Fund 5.819.87 13,579.39 

Forward $233,391.92 



Forward 



Income from Funds for Special Purposes 



Thomas Shipley Fund 

Elliston P, Morris Fund 

John B. Garrett Reading Prize Fund , 

Special Endowment Fund 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund 

Francis Stokes Fund 

George Peirce Prize Fund 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund 

Newton Prize Fund 

Edward B. Conklin Athletic Fund 

Arboretum Fund 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund , 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund . . , 
Jacob and Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 

William T. Elkinton Fund , 

Tilney Memorial Fund , 

Class of 1902 Latin Prize Fund 



Income from the Funds for the College 
Income from Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund . . . 



Total Income from All Funds . . • 

Income from College Sources 

Tuition 64,599.44 

Board 37,245.29 

Room 20,081.15 

Re-examination Fees 110.00 

Room and Board from Non-Students: 

Rents 3,122.50 

Rooms: 

Guests and Alumni 1,787.39 

Employees 2,472.30 

Women's International League 225.00 

United Service Organization 357.00 

Institute of International Relations . . . 756.00 

Immigration and Naturalization 

Service 3,980.20 9,577.89 

Meals: 

Guests, Alumni and Day Students .... 2,742.42 

Employees 5,768.70 

Women's International League 111.25 

United Service Organization 1,223.30 

Institute of International Relations . . . 1,672.40 
Immigration and Naturalization 

Service 8,820.50 

Summer Session -- 1945 4,650.82 





$233,391.92 


272.60 




58.53 




118.03 




479.29 




119.31 




90.59 




132.30 




265.97 




118.38 




111.94 




72.61 




124.67 




238.31 




103.89 




51.94 




199.44 




112.63 




56.69 




134.29 




67.39 




4.52 


2,933.32 




$236,325.24 




1,098.25 




$237,423.49 



24,989.39 37,689.78 



Miscellaneous 8,283.79 168,009.45 

Forward $405,432.94 



Forward 

Accelerated S ummer Term 1944, Completed 

From United States Government 6,171.36 

From Alumni Association, Refund of Salary 100,00 

(Withi Receipts in 1943-1944, this makes 
Total Receipts of $29,477.89) 



$405,432.94 



Army Specialized Training Program (Completed) 

Additional Receipts from United States Government: 

Use of Facilities 980.43 

Instruction 21,914.65 

Medical 2,115.87 

Subsistence 4,487.11 

Maintenance and Operation 9,714.70 

Books 1,960.91 

Sale of Material 53.04 

Amount subject to negotiation 800.00 

(With Receipts of $160,041.51 in 1943-1944 
makes Total Receipts of $202,066.22) 



6,271.36 



42,026.71 



Immigration and Naturalization Service 

From United States Government Department of Justice 14,175.70 

Accelerated Summer Term 1945, Uncompleted 

Tuition: 

Paid by Students 6,215.00 

From Scholarship Funds Income 2,875.00 

From Donations for Scholarships 360.00 9,450.00 

Board 6,561.40 

Room Rents 3,030.75 19,042.15 

Donations other than for Funds 



Daniel B. Smith Fund -- Income from Executor .... 
Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund -- 

Income from Sale of Books 

William T. Elkinton Fund -- Income from Trustee . . 
Class of 1902 Latin Prize Fund -- 

Income previously donated 

General Donations Account: 

For Athletics -- For Field House 

Books 

Gift of E. Block 50.00 

Library Associates 459.20 

Minor Library Donations 30.22 

Matzke Royalties 26.10 

Scholarships 

Anonymous 1,000.00 

Anonymous 800.00 

Philadelphia Schools 

for Summer Session 100.00 

Guggenheim Foundation 400.00 

Max Leuchter 100.00 

World Fellowship Foundation for 

■ Reconstruction & Relief 500.00 

Forward 2,900,00 



184.16 



75,00 
11.11 



39.00 



46.00 



565.52 



309.27 



611.52 



309,27 $486,948,86 



10 



Forward $486,948.86 

Donations other than for Funds (continued) 

Forward 2,900.00 611.52 309.27 

Student Council of Haverford 

College 155.75 

L. Szerlig 300.00 

Upper Darby High School 100.00 3,455.75 

For Salaries — Alumni Association 1,600.00 

For Campus Club 31.00 

For Care of Cope Field 50.00 

For General Purposes 45.00 

For Government House -- National Fd'n. 

for Education 500.00 

For Radio Club -- Interest allowed 62.24 

6,355.51 
For Transfers from Pew Gift 

(See Expenditures) 1,600.00 7,955.51 

Triangle Society -- Pew Gift 

Proceeds of Sale of Stock Donated 9,534.98 

Dividends received before sale 84.75 9,619.73 

Alumni Sustaining Fund Donations 42,129.02 

Total Current Donations 60,013.53 

Donations for Additions to Funds 

James R. Magee Fund -- Additional from Executor . . 175.00 
Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship 

Fund -- Donated 1,000.00 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund -- Donated 500.00 

Daniel B. Smith Fund -- Bequest of 

Esther Morton Smith 2,500.00 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund -- Donated . 12,000.00 

Class of 1888 Library Fund -- Donated 500.00 

William T. Elkinton Fund (New) -- Bequest 2,491.50 

Tiiney Memorial Fund (New) -- Donated 2,000.00 

Class of 1902 Latin Prize Fund (New) -- Donated . . . 142.90 21,309.40 

Additions to Funds -- Income Transferred 
to Principal 

Moses Brown Fund -- Income capitalized 1,847.34 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund — 

Income capitalized 90.45 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund — 

Income capitalized 578.17 

George Peirce Prize Fund — Income capitalized . . . 118.38 

Jacob and Eugenie Bucky Memorial Fund -- 

Income capitalized 112.63 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund — 

Income capitalized 41.69 2,788.66 

Cost of Seven Campus Dwellings taken into 

Consolidated Investment Account 79,831.70 

Total Additions to Funds 

(Other than gains on investments realized) 103,929.76 

Forward $650,892.15 



11 



Forward $650,892.15 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

From Library a/c to set up new a/c — 

Sale of Books, Biology 735.56 

From Library a/c to set up new a/c -- 

Sale of Books, Chemistry 24.20 

From Library a/c to set up new a/c -- 

Sale of Books, Physics 40.93 

Skating Pond Receipts 541.95 

Transferred from Bird Sanctuary Donation 121.70 663.65 

Income Tax Withholdings -- Salaries 37,074.07 

Income Tax Withholdings -- Pensions 1,648.60 

Advances to be refunded 296.99 

In and Out 1,369.71 

Work done for Others, paid for 1,358.02 

Book Store Receipts 1,468.52 

Store Account (Fry, Manager) 5,355.59 

Receipts from Government for E.S.M.W.T 1,188.00 

Griffin Lane Properties -- Receivables 1,140.66 

Interest Received 1,838.13 

Student Loan Fund Repayment on a/c 4,000.00 

Accounts Receivable from Students 163,851.10 

Accounts Receivable from Employees 36,608.37 

Accounts Receivable from Army 996.28 259,658.38 

Items Relating to Other Fiscal Years 

Accounts Receivable from Previous Year 2,689.22 

Advance Receipts for Following Year 3,615.93 

Expenses for Following Year -- refunded 5,268.86 

Insurance for Following Year — refunded 8,558.54 

Language House Alterations — Reserve Applied 4th Year 511.87 

Kitchen Alterations -- Reserve Applied 4th Year 2,501.03 23,145.45 

Investments Realized 

Consolidated Investments Account 

Bonds -- Government 106,121.75 

Industrial 44,577.43 

Public Utility 2,100.00 

Railroad 278,087.73 

Miscellaneous 10,915.50 441,802.41 

Preferred Stocks — 

Industrial 38,287.17 

Public Utility 70,150.00 108,437.17 

Common Stocks 

Bank & Insurance 17,986.70 

Industrial 11,396.00 

Public Utility 11,652.86 

Miscellaneous 17.00 41,052.56 

Mortgages 88,908.90 

Real Estate 

Sold 225,588.36 

Sundry Receipts 701.22 226,289.58 

Miscellaneous 5,579.23 912,069.85 

Forward 912,069.85 $933,695.98 



12 



Forward $933,695.98 

Investments Realized (continued) 

Forward 912,069.85 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 14,243.48 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 

(First National Bank & Trust Co. of Minneaspolis, Minn.) 

(Entered short $2,127.50) 8,940.24 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 

(Provident Trust Co., Trustee) 

Ellen W. Longstreth -- Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 2,533.38 

Augustus Taber Murray Research <=!cholarship Fund 5,375.00 943,161.95 

Money Borrowed Temporarily 60,000.00 

Balances 9th Month 1, 1944 : 

In Treasurer s Accoimt 94,632.64 

In President's Account 15,513.18 110,145.82 

$2,047,003.75 



13 



EXPENDITURES 



1944 ■ 1945 



Expenses of Running the College 



Administration 

Salaries , 

Supplies and Postage . . , 

Services , 

Telephone & Telegraph . 
Additional Equipment . . , 

Insurance . 

Traveling , 

Public Relations 

Printing 

Entertainment 

Educational Departments 

Salaries 

Supplies 

Services 

Telephone & Telegraph . , 
Replacement & Repair. . , 
Additional Equipment . . . 

Taxes 

Insurance , 

Auto Maintenance. . . . . , 

Traveling 

Public Relations. ...... 

Printing . . . , 

Miscellaneous 

Maintenance & Operation 

Wages 

Supplies 

Services 

Water, heat, light, power, 
Telephone & Telegraph , , 
Replacement & Repair. . , 
Additional Equipment . . , 

Major Alterations 

Taxes 

Insurance ......' 

Auto Operation 

Miscellaneous ........ 

Kitchen 

Wages 

Provisions . , 

Services. 

Water, heat, light, power, 
Telephone & Tc'egraph . , 
Replacement & Repair. . . 
Additional Equipment . . , 

Taxes 

Insurance 

Traveling 

Forward. . . . . 



49,911.21 
1,641.52 

481.82 

590.77 
cr. 34.26 

121.45 

233.08 

632.16 
3,227.76 
1,434.08 58,239.59 



167,046.31 

2,175.52 

1,076.56 

835.21 

cr. 38.25 

336.91 

1.00 

1,163.71 

12.40 

1,662.56 

77.35 

77.00 

cr. 366.63 



43,607.19 

13,433.13 

3,669.31 

5,119.27 

355.99 
1,996.69 

843.53 

452.11 
2,447.36 
3,958.72 

503.17 
2,261.69 



18,410.41 

30,267.90 

607.30 

3,263.50 

180.64 

244.93 

512.42 

10.00 

209.85 

16.46 



174,059.65 



78,648.16 



53,723.41 364,670.81 
364,670.81 



14 



Forward 

Stork Art Gift, shortage of income to meet interest 
charge ........ 

Fourth 1/6 cost of Language House 

Alterations (written off) 

Fourth 1/6 cost of Kitchen 

Alterations (written off) 

Treasurer's & Secretary's Expenses 

Old Style Pensions 

Annuity 

Interest Paid 

UncoUectable Account written off 

Expense of College for regular students 

Accelerated Summer Term 1944, completed 
(Additional net expenses as follows:) 

Provisions 

Family Expenses & Furniture 

Fuel and Light , 

Kitchen Laundry 

Library. , 

Various Educational 

Printing 

Moving Expense 

Refund of Tuition 

(Deducting these from the balance carried over 
from 1943-44, and the receipts collected in 
1944-45 leaves a final credit balance of $9,485.64) 



364,670.81 



950,00 

511.87 

2,501.03 
5,282.69 
22,928.12 
1,600.00 
6,533.82 
161.24 



1,090.48 

13.27 

311.22 

106.95 

40.56 

7.23 

10.00 

61.62 

60.00 



405,139.58 



1,701.33 



Premeteorological Unit, Final Settlement 

Refund paid U. S. Government in final settlement 
(This was paid from reserve of $16,200.26 
set aside in 1943 44, showing final gain of 
$470.30) 



15,729.96 



Army Sppcialized Training Program, Completed 

Activating Costs 

Use of Facilities 

Instruction Books. 

Transferred to Tuition a/c 

Transferred to Summer Term 1944 

Medical 

Subsistence Provisions 

Supplies. . , 

Wages . 

Depreciation 

Maintenance charges 

Maintenance and Operation 

Janitors 

Supervisory. 

Utilities Electricity 

Water. , , 

Coal 

Repairs , 

Forward , 





169.40 




980.43 


410.30 




5,200.00 




6,171.36 


11,781.66 




931.64 


2,480.16 




266.60 




760.96 




253.74 


3,761.46 


955.49 




100.00 


1,055.49 


88.80 




149.80 




467.08 




9.58 


715.26 



19,395.34 422,570.87 



15 



Forward 

Army Specialized Training Program, Completed (continued) 

Depreciation , 

Administrative 

Repairs to Lloyd Hall 676.85 

Repairs to Barclay Hall 911.68 

(With expenditures of $189,797.69 incurred in 
1943-44, all expenditures totalled $210,873.93. 
Deducting the $202,068.22 receipts collected 
from the Government, there remained a net 
loss to the College of $8,805.71) 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Transferred to Board and Rdom from Non Students 
Transferred to Miscellaneous Receipts account 

as income 

Furniture in Lounges 

Phone 

Athletics 



19,395.34 422,570.87 



11.90 
80.47 



1.588.53 



12,800.70 

1,175.01 

139.00 

52.19 

8.80 



21,076.24 



14,175.70 



Accelerated Summer Term, 1945 (Uncompleted ) 

Administrative Salaries 

Faculty Salaries 

Library Salaries ..... 

Maintenance and Operation - Wages 

Laundry 

Coal 

Water ....... 

Light 

Athletics - Coach 

Trip to Princeton 

Graduation Speaker 

Program 

Directory 

Cost of meals served to students 

(credited to Board and Room a/c) 



300.00 




6,025.00 




700.00 


7,025.00 


2,753.44 




11.60 




1,755.00 




200,00 




270.74 


4,990.78 


70.00 




74.29 


144.29 


50.00 




10.00 


60.00 




53.20 




4,650,82 



16,924.09 



Expenditures from Income of Funds for Scholarships 
and Fellowships 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 3,400.00 

Moses Brown Fund 3,362.25 

Moses Brown Fund at Pendle Hill 350.00 3,712.25 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 225.00 

Edward Yarnall Fund 425.00 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 1,110,00 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund 575.00 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 400.00 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 385.00 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 350.00 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 280.00 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 450.00 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund. . . . 475.00 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund 675.00 

Forward 12,462.25 



474,746.90 



16 



Forward 12,462.25 474,746.90 

Expenditures from Income of Funds for Scholarships 
and Fellowships (continued) 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 200.00 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 300.00 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 225.00 

Daniel B. Smith Fund 150.00 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fimd. . 3,589.00 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 150.00 



17,076.25 



Expenditures from Income of Special Trust 



Augustus Taber Murray Research 

Scholarship Fund - Annuity 980.00 

Expenditures from Income of Funds for Library 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund - Books 206.20 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund - Books 299.28 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 

Books - General 2,577.87 

Books - Christian Knowledge. . 249.94 

Lecture 84.50 2.912.31 

William H. Jenks Library Fund - Books 143.56 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund - Books 1,102.10 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund - Books 22.05 

Edmund Morris Fergusson Jr. Memorial Fund - . 

Books 42.42 

Class of 1888 Library Fund - Books 376.63 5,104.55 

Expenditures from Income of Fxmds for Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund - Lecture 127.57 

Elliston P. Morris Fund - Books 19.67 

Special Endowment Fund - 

Religious Education Committee 200.00 

Friends Council on Education 25.00 225.00 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund - Prizes . . 95.00 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund - Prize 20.00 

S.P. Lippincott History Prize Fimd 

Prize 100.00 

Books 97.15 197.15 

Newton Prize Fund - Books 13.35 

Arboretum Fund - Spraying Trees 125.00 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund - Prize 50.00 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund - 

Lighting etc : . . 89.15 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - Prize . , . 15.00 

William T. Elkintoti Fund-Travel Expense, etc. . . 39.74 

Class of 1902 Latin Prize Fund - Prize 10.00 1,026.63 24,187.43 

Spent from Donations 

For Music - from Gift of Carnegie Foundation. . . 2,145.83 

For Field House - Invested in U.S. Bonds 185.00 

For Books - From gift of E. Block 42.88 

From gift of Carnegie 

Foundation 37.74 



Forward 80.62 2,330.83 498,934,33 



17 



Forward 

Spent from Donations (continued) 

Forward 80.62 2,330.83 

From gift of Class of 1932 ,. 22.15 

From gift of Library 

Associates 88.90 

From Minor Library 

Donations 54.92 

From Matzke Royalties .... 67.21 313.80 
For London Times - from gift of Christopher Morley 21.00 

For Post War Planning - books 11.02 

For Prizes - Class of 1910 Poetry Prize 25.00 

For Scholarships 3,509.50 

For Campus Club 20.53 

For Chemical Laboratory Equipment 417.26 

For Engineering Equipment 49.50 t 

For S S Haverford Victory, Library on board . . . 300.00 

For Kitchen Repairs 415.75 

For Prize Essay from gift of National Foiindation 

for Education 100.00 

For Radio Club 40.00 

For Roberts Hall Electrical Equipment 100.00 

For Salaries 3,162.50 

For Transfer to 1902 Latin Prize Fund 39.00 

For Transfer to Skating Pond - Bird 

Sanctuary balance 121.70 10,977.39 

Spent from Triangle Society Gift Donation 

For Salaries 4,249.98 

For Main Line Forum 725.59 

Less share borne by National 

Foundation for Education 500.00 225.59 

For Maps and Books from Army 41.55 4,517.12 

Spent from Triangle Society - Pew Gift 

Salaries for special research work 4,865.37 

Moving Expenses of staff member 250.00 

Traveling Expenses 39.98 

Transferred to Donations a/c for 

Chemical Laboratory Equipment. . . 1,000.00 

Kitchen Repairs 500.00 

Post War Planning - Books 100.00 1,600.00 6,755.35 

Spent from Bucky Foimdation Gift 

For books 73.87 

For Scholarship to Graduate Student 100.00 

For Chapel in the Union 22.62 196.49 

Spent from Alumni Sustaining Fund 

For Expenses of Alumni Association 3,750.00 

For Campaign travel expense 72.00 3,822.00 26,268.35 

(Balance of $38,307.02 used for 
College Budiget Expenses) 

Forward 525,202.68 



18 



Forward 525,202.68 

Miscellaneous Expenditures 

For Books from sale of books- Biology 34.03 

For Books from sale of books- Chemistry 7.64 

Skating Pond Expenses 254.31 

Income Taxes paid from Amounts 

Withheld - Salaries 38,528.55 

Income Taxes paid from Amounts 

Withheld - Pensions 1 ,408.20 

Advances to be refunded - Loan 20.00 

In and Out 817.35 

Work done for Others 1,358.02 

Book Store 1,468.52 

Store account (Fry, Mgr.) 5,391.64 

Student Store, old a/c 81.50 

Spent for E.S.M.W.T 1,188.00 

Loan made 300.00 

Griffin Lane Properties - maintenance 1,140.66 51,998.42 

Accoxmts Receivable from Students - applied. . . . 165,660.29 

Accounts Receivable from Employees • 39,793.98 

Accounts Receivable ifrom Army 996.28 206,450.55 

Items Relating to Other Fiscal Years 

Student Activities Accoxint - applied 1,319.80 

Advance Receipts for Following Year - applied . . 90.00 

Expenses for Following Year - applied. 11,434.44 

Insurance for Following Year - prepaid 16,671.22 

Refund of bill of 1942-43 91.00 29,606.46 

Investments Made or Donated 

Consolidated Investments Accoimt 

Bonds - Government 211,241.31 

Industrial 7,366.90 

Public Utility 31,820.63 

Railroad 96,178.58 

Miscellaneous 10,932.50 357,539.92 

Preferred Stocks - 

Industrial 30,000.00 

Public Utility 31,310,31 61,310.31 

Common Stocks - 

Bank & Insurance 94,175.54 

Industrial 169,762.31 

Public Utility 47,668.63 

Railroad 39,271.54 350,878.02 

Mortgages 121,415.00 

Real Estate - Charges to Principal 632.85 

Miscellaneous 79,831.70 971,607.80 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 5,307.20 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 
(First National Bank & Trust Co. of 
Minneapolis, Minn.) 
(Entered short $2,207.50) 
Ellen W. Longstreth -- Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 236.40 

Anna Yarnall Agency a/c 13.41 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 4,963.53 982,128.34 

Forward 1,795,386.45 



19 



Forward 

Income Transferred to Principal 

Moses Brown Fund 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund . 
Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund .... 

George Peirce Prize Fund 

Jacob and Eugenie Bucky Memorial Fund 
Mathematics Department Prize Fund . . . 





1,795,386.45 


1,847,34 




90.45 




578.17 




118.38 




112.63 




41.69 


2,788.66 



Borrowed Money 



Repaid in full 



60,000.00 



Balances 8th Month 31, 1945 



In Treasurer's Account 
In President's Account 



176,679.03 
12,149.61 188,828.64 



$2,047,003.75 



20 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For the Year Ending 8th Month 31, 1945 
Net Cash Receipts at College 

As per foregoing statement: -;!.^„?]^ir..!'^.VL ' 

Income against the Budget from i«-ic<t;oD 9yA)'in Wav! 
College Sources 

(a) For regular students $168,009.45 '■:iS iniiub b'iBF.-.^ . • '.. 

Less Tuition provided by '^O "■'■^/ro r^'ir^i-.i •. -^ 

Scholarships .(. 

From Funds (This includes ..i 

Summer Term) $16,726.25 ^ : .: , ,;;;:i,-v /r-ji,; zS. 

From Donations 3,509.50 20,235.75 

$147,773.70 

(b) Accelerated Summer Term 1944, completed 

Receipts 1943-44 (see last year's report). . . . 23,206.53 

Receipts 1944-45 6,271.36 29,477,89 b3?,s-r':.oa( 

(c) Premeteorological Unit -- Settlement Reserve 

from 1943-1944 •.»••.-;{>& i i(ll&^Z0DJl6o\^\l^K :■■/■■. 

(d) Army Specialized Training Program ;f?? B M nl "-igfejiS ;r'', 

(completed) 

Receipts 1943-44 160,041.51 . ■ "C; 

Receipts 1944-45 42,026.71 202,068.22 

(e) Immigration and Naturalization Service 14,175.70 

$409,695.77 

Income from Funds, Donations, etc. 

(Applicable to Operating Account after 

capitalizing and special purposes) 
Income from Funds 224,319.57 

Donations: ,1 

Alumni Sustaining Fund (Net) 38,307.02 

For Cope Field care :,,;,. . 50.00 

For General Purposes ^A. -..s.,. ; 45,00 

For Scholarships (as above) .j->. ^}\\..rf;y. ,:3,509.50 41,911.52 

Interest Received 1,838.13 

Returned from Student Loan Fund 4,000.00 

" ' 272,069.22 

681,764.99 
Expenses of Running the College 

(a) Regular Expenses, as per foregoing statement 405,139.58 

(b) Accelerated Summer Term 1944 Completed 

Spent 1943-44 

(See last year's report) 18,290.92 

Spent 1944-45 1,701.33 19,992.25 

(Gain 9,485.64) 

(c) Premeteorological Unit 

Final Settlement paid to Government 15,729.96 

(Gain 470.30) 

(d) Army Specialized Training Program 

Spent 1943-44 189,797.69 

Spent 1944-45 21,076.24 210,873.93 

(Loss 8,805.71) 

(e) Immigration and Naturalization Service 14,175.70 

(No Gain or Loss) 665,911.42 

Operating Gain for 1944-45 $15,853.57 

21 



STATEMENT OF DEBT OF THE CORPORATION 

8th Month 31, 1945 

DEBT OF THE CORPORATION 

Debt of the Corporation 9th Month 1, 1944 $104,603.86 

Decreased during the year 

By taking over Debt incurred for 

Seven Campus Houses into 

Consolidated Investments Account $79,831.70 

By Operating Gain 1944-45 15,853.57 

$95,685.27 

Increased during the year 

By Refund of Tuition 1942-« 

(To Student in U. S. Service) 

Debt reduced 

Debt 8th Month 31, 1945 



91.00 




95,594.27 




$ 


9,009.59 



Note: - The Investment of the Fxmds in College Lane 
Real Estate, with eight houses thereon, to- 
gether with the above seven houses, was com- 
bined with all other Campus Houses in Con- 
solidated Investments Accoimt at a total book 
value of $281,331.70. This will be amortized 
annually. 



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29 



1917 FIDELITY- PHILADELPHIA TRUST BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 



September 27, 1945. 



Board of Managers, 

The Corporation of Haverford College, 

Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Dear Sirs: 

We have examined the statement of receipts and expenditures 
and the operating statement for the fiscal year ended 8th Month 31, 1945 
and the statement of debt of the corporation as of said date as set forth 
in the annual report of the Treasurer and Comptroller of The Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College. 

Our examination comprised the verification of the receipts and 
expenditures of the Treasurer and Comptroller for the year; the recon- 
ciliation of the cash balance at 8th Month 31, 1945 with the balance on 
deposit in bank; and the examination of the securities held by the Provi- 
dent Trust Company as fiscal agent for the Corporation. 

In our opinion, the annual report of the Treasurer and Comp- 
troller correctly sets forth the results of the operations of The Cor- 
poration of Haverford College for the fiscal year ended 8th Month 31, 
1945 in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied 
on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 



Very truly yours, 

Lawrence E. Brown & Company 
Certified Public Accountants 



30 



DONATIONS FOR ADDITIONS TO FUNDS 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Further distribution of principal 

of Anna J. Magee Trust $175.00 

ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From -- Harry M. Zuckert 1,000.00 

CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through -- Dr. John W. Spaeth, Jr. 

From: William H. Chamberlin $ 5.00 

Dr. G. Donald Chandler 50.00 

Loring Dam 35.00 

Joseph W. Greene, Jr 75.00 

Robert B. Haines 25.00 

Albert W. Hall 20.00 

Weston Rowland 10.00 

H. Lawrence Jones 5.00 

M. Alexander Laverty 10.00 

Dr. Nelion F. Paxson 10.00 

Dr. E. Rowland Snader, Jr 20.00 

Dr. John W. Spaeth, Jr 25.00 

Arthur E. Spellissy 200.00 

T. Barclay Whitson 10.00 500.00 

DANIEL B. SMITH FUND 

Bequest from Esther Morton Smith, 

Francis R. Taylor, Executor 2,500.00 

ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From -- Mrs. Almy C. Grant 2,000.00 

Grant Foundation, Inc 10,000.00 12,000.00 

CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

From -- William Draper Lewis 500.00 

WILLIAM T. ELKINTON FUND (New ) 

Bequest from William T. Elkinton, 

Thomas W. Elkinton, Trustee 2,491.50 

TILNEY MEMORIAL FUND (New) 

From -- I. Sheldon Tilney 2,000.00 

CLASS OF 1902 LATIN PRIZE FUND (New ) 

Through -- A. C. Wood, Jr., Secretary 142.90 $21,309.40 



31 



DONATIONS 



DONATIONS OTHER THAN FOR FUNDS 

DANIEL B. SMITH FUND 

Income from Bequest from Esther Morton Smith, 

Francis R. Taylor, Executor 

ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Income from Sale of Books 

WILLIAM T. ELKINTON FUND 

Income from Trustee (Thomas W. Elklnton) 

CLASS OF 1902 LATIN PRIZE FUND 

(A. C. Wood, Jr., Secretary) 

GENERAL DONATIONS ACCOUNT 

FOR ATHLETICS -- FIELD HOUSE 

Through A. W. Haddleton 

Through Mrs. J. A. Paisley 

FOR BOOKS 

Gift of Mr. E. Block 

Library Associates 
From: 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Allendoerfer 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft 2.00 

Mr. Robert Barrie 2.00 

Miss Mabel Beard 2.00 

Miss Florence Beddall 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. C. J. Bergh 2.00 

Mrs. Robert Montgomery Bird 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bleyden 2.00 

Lt. Comdr. & Mrs. H. Tatnall Brown, Jr 2.00 

Miss Caroline Burgess 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Aldo Caselli 2.00 

Miss Edith Chambers 2.00 

Mrs. George H. Chambers 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George K. Chandler 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Cloud 2.00 

Mrs. William H. Collins 2.00 

Mr. Irwin T. Darlington 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. David 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Lovett Dewees 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Drake 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Drinker, Jr 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. McClure Fahnestock 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Clifford B. Farr 2.00 

Miss Muriel Farr 2.00 

Mr. P. D. Folwell 10.00 

Mrs. Horace B. Forman 2.00 

Miss Kathryn V. Forrest 2.00 

Mrs. Sara K. Fuller 2.00 

Forward 72.00 



184.16 



75.00 



11.11 



39.00 



21.00 
25.00 



50.00 



309.27 



46.00 



50.00 



355.27 



32 



Forward 50.00 355.27 

FOR BOOKS (continued) 

Forward 72.00 

Rev. Joseph J. Gildea 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Gould 4.00 

Miss Gladys H. Griscom 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry V. Gummere 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Gummere 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Gummere 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Hastings, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Robert Hay 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Herndon 10.00 

Miss Margaretta S. Hinchman 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. David Hinshaw 10.00 

Sgt. William L. Hires 2.20 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence G. Hoag 10.00 

Mr. Allen F. Horton 2.00 

Mr. Andrew D. Hunt 2.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 2.00 

Mrs. Ralph D. Jackson 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Jenkins 10.00 

Mrs. Eloise N. Jenks 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Ames Johnston 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Barclay Jones 5.00 

Mrs. Rufus M. Jones 2.00 

Mr. Thomas O. Jones 2.00 

Mr. John A. Kelly 10.00 

Mr. W. M. C. Kimber 2.00 

Mrs. Isaac La Boiteaux 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris E. Leeds 10.00 

Mr. Nathaniel H. Litchfield 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lober 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Lockwood 2.00 

Dr. Robert M. Lockwood 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Longstreth 2.00 

Capt. Benjamin H. Lowry 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Ludlow 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Macintosh 2.00 

Mr. James P. Magill 10.00 

Miss Belle Matheson 2.00 

Mr. J. Wesley Matthews 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Meldrum 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Merrill 2.00 

Mr. Wolfgang F. Michael 2.00 

Rev. and Mrs. S. G. Morton Montgomery 2.00 

Mr. Charles Henry Moon 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Morley 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Felix Morley 10.00 

Dr. Harold H. Morris 2.00 

Mr. Elliott H. Morse 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Mudd 2.00 

Mr. Philip G. Nordell 2.00 

Miss Violet Oakley 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond T. Ohl 2.00 

Mr. Nicholas Orehoff 2.00 

Miss Jessie Allen Page 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Palmer, Jr 2.00 

Mr. Oliver W. Paxson 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Arnold Post 2.00 

Forward 284.20 50.00 355.27 



33 



Forward 50.00 355.27 

FOR BOOKS (continued) 

Forward 284.20 

Mrs. G. R. Rebmann 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Layton Register 2.00 

Mrs. William A. Reitzel 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Rhoads 10.00 

Dr. and Mrs. A. Newton Richards 2.00 

Mr. Charles S. Ristlne 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick P. Ristine 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon H. Rittenhouse 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rosengarten 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Sargent 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop Sargent, Jr 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Henry Scattergood 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Scoville, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Shero 2.00 

Miss Mary C. Smith 2.00 

Dr. E. Roland Snader, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Snyder 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Freas B. Snyder 4.00 

Dr. and Mrs. William C. Stadie 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. 1. Thomas Steere 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan M. Steere 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Tyson Stokes 25.00 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Stuart 2.00 

Mrs. Arthur H. Thomas 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Nelson L. West 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. West 2.00 

Mr. Theodore Whittelsey 2.00 

Mr. H. Justice Williams 2.00 

Lt. A. Jardine Williamson (two years) 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Wills 2.00 

Mr. Albert H. Wilson 10.00 

Mrs. Albert H. Wilson 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Wright Wilson 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wistar 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander C. Wood, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Wood 2.00 

Dr. Rachel B. Woodford 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Woolman 2.00 

Mr. Edwin W. Zerrer 2.00 459.20 

Minor Library Donations 

(Through Mr. D. P. Lockwood) 30.22 

Matzke Royalties (From Publisher) 26.10 565.52 

FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Anonymous 1,000.00 

Anonymous 800.00 1,800.00 

Philadelphia Schools -- Summer Session 100.00 

Guggenheim Foundation 400.00 

Mr. Max Leuchter 100.00 

World Fellowship Foundation for R. & R 500.00 

Student Council of Haverford College 155.75 

Mr. L. Szerlig 300.00 

Upper Darby Senior High School 100.00 3,455.75 

Forward 4,376.54 



34 



Forward 4,376.54 

FOR SALARIES 

From: Alumni Association 1,600.00 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB 

From: 

Mr. Albert L. Baily, Jr 15.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis F. Campbell 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Legh W. Reid 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Smiley, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard M. Teaf, Jr 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis W, Van Meter 5.00 31.00 

FOR CARE OF COPE FIELD 

From: Mr. Alfred G. Scattergood, Trustee 50.00 

FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 

From: 

1944 I.N.S. Training Group 30.00 

Miss M. Beard 15.00 45.00 

FOR GOVERNMENT HOUSE 

From: National Foundation for Education 500.00 

FOR RADIO CLUB 

Interest Allowed 62.24 

TRIANGLE SOCIETY GIFT — PEW GIFT 

Proceeds of sale of stock donated 9,534.98 

Dividends on stock 84.75 9,619.73 

ALUMNI SUSTAINING FUND 

List of Contributors as follows 42,129.02 

58,413.53 



35 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE "ALUMNI FUND " 

The Class of 1881 

Levi T. Edwards 

Mrs. Isaac T. Johnson, In Memory of Isaac T. Johnson .... 
Walter F. Price 

The Class of 1882 

Edward Randolph 

The Class of 1883 

William L, Baily 

Stephen W. Collins 

George H, Evans 

Louis B, Whitney 

The Class of 1884 

J, Henry Allen 

Walter L. Moore 

The Class of 1885 

William T, Ferris 

Marriott C. Morris 

The Class of 1887 

Edward F. Chillman 

Henry H. Goddard 

Frederic H. Strawbridge 

The Class of 1888 

Henry V. Gummere , 

Morris E. Leeds 

G. Brinton Roberts 

The Class of 1889 

William R. Dunton, Jr 

Thomas Evans 

Warner Fite 

Franklin B. Kirkbride 

Lawrence J. Morris 

Charles M. Shupert 

J. Stogdell Stokes 

The Class of 1890 

Henry P. Baily 

George T, Butler 

Guy H, Davies 

Thomas S. Janney 

Lewis Jones 

Johathan M. Steere 

Robert R. Tatnall 

The Class of 1891 

Carey Coale 

The Class of 1892 

Benjamin Cadbury 

Walter M, Hart 

John W. Muir : . . , 

Gilbert J, Palen , . , 

Forward 70.00 7,337,00 



10.00 

5,000.00 

5,00 


5,015.00 


10,00 


10.00 


5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 


20,00 


2.00 
5.00 


7,00 


25.00 
25.00 


50.00 


10.00 
100.00 
500.00 


610.00 


10.00 

1,000.00 

10.00 


1,020.00 


100.00 

100.00 

10.00 

10.00 

25.00 

5.00 

100.00 


350.00 


50.00 
10.00 
50.00 
10,00 
25.00 
100.00 
5,00 


250.00 


5,00 


5.00 


25.00 
10.00 
10,00 
25,00 





36 



Forward 7,337.00 

The Class of 1892 (continued) 

Forward 70.00 

W. Nelson L. West 200.00 

Stanley R. Yarnall 50.00 320.00 

The Class of 1893 

Leslie A. Bailey 25.00 

Walter W. Haviland 10.00 

Clarence G. Hoag 25.00 

Arthur V, Morton 1,520.63 

John M. Okie 25.00 

Charles J. Rhoads 100.00 

Barton Sensenig 10.00 

Edward Woolman 500.00 

Gifford K. Wright 25.00 2,240.63 

The Class of 1894 

J. Henry Bartlett 10.00 

Alfred Busselle 10.00 

William W. Comfort 15.00 

Henry S. Conard 25.00 

Clifford B. Farr 5.00 

Kane S. Green 25.00 

Anson B. Harvey 3.00 

Martin N. Miller 5.00 

Edward E. Quimby 10.00 

Frederick P. Ristine 100.00 

Jonathan T. Rorer 5.00 

Francis J. Stokes 250.00 463.00 

The Class of 1895 

Samuel H. Brown 2.00 

Frank H. Conklin 25.00 

Allen C. Thomas 50.00 77.00 

The Class of 1896 

William H. Settle 10.00 

Thomas H. Haines 10.00 

John A. Lester 5.00 

J. Henry Scattergood 250.00 

L. Hollingsworth Wood 5.00 280.00 

The Class of 1897 

Roswell C. McCrea 25.00 

WUliam G. Rhoads 10.00 35.00 

The Class of 1898 

William W. Cadbury 

C. Herbert Bell 

Mrs. Walter C. Janney, In Memory of Walter C. Janney. . . . 

Morris M. Lee 

F. Sims McGrath 

Alfred G. Scattergood 

Francis R, Strawbndge 

Robert N. Wilson 

Thomas Wistar 

Richard D. Wood 

Forward 11,122.63 



37 



5.00 




10.00 




25.00 




10.00 




25.00 




100.00 


* 


100.00 




10.00 




75.00 




10.00 


370.00 



Forward 11,122,63 

The Class of 1899 

William A. Battey 100.00 

John D. Carter 10.00 

Arthur Haines 15.00 

Joseph Paul Morris 15.00 

Elisha R. Richie 10.00 

Frank K. Walter 5.00 

A. Clement Wild 100.00 255.00 

The Class of 1900 

William W. Allen, Jr 25.00 

William B. Bell 250.00 

Henry S. Drinker, Jr 100.00 

Christian Febiger 100.00 

Henry M. Hallett 10.00 

Walter S. Hinchman 25.00 

Furman S. Howson 25.00 

Samuel Wright Mifflin 10.00 

Frederic C. Sharpless 100.00 

Abram G. Tatnall 8.00 653.00 

The Class of 1901 

Ellis Y. Brown. 100.00 

William E. Cadbury 20.00 

Lovett Dewees 25.00 

William H. Kirkbride 10.00 

Herbert S. Langfeld 10.00 

W. LaCoste Neilson 5.00 170.00 

The Class of 1902 

Edgar H. Boles 200.00 

Edward W. Evans 100.00 

William C. Longstreth 10.00 

Gurney E. Newlin 10.00 

William P. Philips 3,750.00 

Robert J. RosS 50.00 

John L. Stone 100.00 

Edgar E. Trout 10.00 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 100.00 4,330.00 

The Class of 1903 

Clarence R. Cornman 25.00 

Archer G. Dean 10.00 

Harry A. Domincovich 25.00 

James B. Drinker 20.00 

U. Mercur Eshleman 10.00 

John E. HoUingsworth 5.00 

Arthur J. Phillips 25.00 

Robert L. Simkin 300.00 

I. Sheldon Tilney 25.00 

Howard M. Trueblood 10.00 455.00 

The Class of 1904 

Edwin J. Bevan 5.00 

Joseph W. Clark 20.00 

Arthur Crowell 100.00 

Philip D. Folwell 100.00 

Chester R. Haig 100.00 



Forward 325.00 16,985.63 



38 



Forward 16,985.63 

The Class of 1904 (continued) 

Forward 325.00 

C. Christopher Morris 500.00 

Harold H. Morris 25.00 

Charles R. Owen 25.00 

Edgar T. Snipes 7.50 

James M. Stokes, Jr 25.00 

John R. Thomas 10.00 

Bert C. Wells 5.00 

William M. Wills 50.00 

Samuel C. Withers 10.00 982.50 

The Class of 1905 

Maurice J. Babb 15.00 

Thomas M. Bales 5.00 

Charles S. Bushnell 25.00 

Henry Cox 5.00 

Benjamin Eshleman 50.00 

Arthur H. Hopkins 25.00 

Paul Jones 100.00 

Charles S. Lee 25.00 

Joseph H. Morris 10.00 

Effingham Murray 10.00 

E. Converse Peirce 25.00 

Glyndon Priestman 10.00 

Elias Ritts 100.00 

Leslie B. Seely 20.00 

Sigmund Spaeth 10.00 

Herman K. Stein 50.00 

Edwards F. Winslow 5.00 490.00 

The Class of 1906 

Edmund F. Bainbridge 10.00 

Thomas Crowell 25.00 

Gordon H. Graves 6.00 

Albert W. Hemphill 20.00 

H. Boardman Hopper 25.00 

James Monroe 50.00 

Henry Pleasants 100.00 

Roderick Scott 10.00 

Albert K. Smiley 75.00 

Johii A. Stratton 10.00 

Francis R. Taylor 150,00 

Joseph J. Tunney 50.00 

Walter A. Young 5.00 536.00 

The Class of 1907 

Joseph C. Birdsall 5,000.00 

George B. Comfort 5.00 

Harold Evans 250.00 

Samuel J. Gummere 15.00 

Ernest F. Jones 2.00 

James P. Magill 500.00 

Edward C. Tatnall 25.00 

Emmett R. Tatnall 10.00 

Alexander N. Warner 25.00 5,832.00 

Forward 24,826.13 



39 



Forward 24,826.13 

The Class of 1908 

Carroll T. Brown 5.00 

Howard Burtt 15.00 

Dudley D. Carroll 5.00 

J. Browning Clement, Jr 10.00 

Edward A, Edwards 25.00 

George W. Emlen, Jr 25.00 

Morris A. Linton 25.00 

T. Morris Longstreth 5.00 

Charles L. Miller 50.00 

W. Haviland Morriss 25.00 

Winthrop Sargent 10.00 

George K. Strode 10.00 210.00 

The Class of 1909 

Gerald H. Deacon 20.00 

Percival B„ Fay 10.00 

William S. Jtebiger 100.00 

Allan J. Hill 500.00 

Paul V. R. Miller 100.00 

Frank M. Ramsey 15.00 

Walter C. Sandt 25.00 

Mark H. C. Spiers 5.00 

J. Warrington Stokes 10.00 785.00 

The Class of 1910 

E. Page Allinson 50.00 

Earlham Bryant 10.00 

Edward W. David 25.00 

George A. Kerbaugh 250.00 

Christopher Morley 50.00 

Reginald H. Morris 25.00 

Walter Palmer 20.00 

Samuel A. Rabinowitz 5.00 

Charles S. Ristine 100.00 535.00 

The Class of 1911 

John S. Bradway 10.00 

Philip B. Deane 100.00 

R. Walter D^nt 10.00 

William D. Hartshorne, Jr 5.00 

David S. Hinshaw 25.00 

William L. Kleinz 10.00 

L. Arnold Post 25.00 

D. Duer Reynolds 100.00 

Lucius R. Shero 15.00 

Gibson Smith 100.00 

J. Walter Tebbetts 10.00 

Caleb Winslow 5.00 

Alan S. Young 5.00 420.00 

The Class of 1912 

Albert L. Baily, Jr 15.00 

Robert E. Miller 25.00 

Sidney S. Morris 20.00 

Irwin C. Poley 10.00 

Leonard C. Ritts 25.00 95.00 

Forward 26,871.13 



40 



Forward 26,871.13 

The Class of 1913 

Joseph M. Beatty, Jr 5.00 

William S. Crowder 25.00 

Charles G. Darlington 10.00 

Norris F. Hall 4.00 

Charles E. Hires, Jr 100.00 

Elisha T. Kirk 10.00 

Stephen W. Meader 50.00 

Oliver M. Porter 10.00 

John V. Van Sickle 10.00 

WUliam Webb 5.00 

Georges M. Weber 25.00 

Donald Wilder 5.00 

Edwards F. Winslow 5.00 264.00 

The Class of 1914 

Carroll D. Champlin 10.00 

George V. Downing 10.00 

Alfred W. Elkinton 25.00 

Howard W. Elkinton 50.00 

Thomas W. Elkinton 500.00 

John K. Garrigues 50.00 

Edward M. Jones, Jr 10.00 

Robert A. Locke 100.00 

Baxter K. Richardson 10.00 

S. Emlen Stokes 250.00 

Thomas Tomlinson 10.00 

Charles K. Trueblood 10.00 1,035.00 

The Class of 1915 

G. Cheston Carey 100.00 

Emmett R. Dunn 10.00 

Cyrus Falconer 10.00 

John W. Gummere 9.00 

Harold W. Helveston 100.00 

Felix Morley 50.00 

Elmer L. Shaffer 10.00 

C. Brinkley Turner 5.00 

Walter E. Vail 25.00 

Donald B. Van Hollen 5.00 3^4.00 

The Class of 1916 

Frederick C. Buffum 100.00 

James Carey, 3rd 25.00 

Frank W. Cary 50.00 

Joseph A. Cooper 10.00 

Bolton L. Corson 50.00 

George A. Dunlap 10.00 

Albert G. Garrigues 10.00 

William T. Hannum 10.00 

Raymond C. Kendig 10.00 

WUliam T. Kirk 3rd 25.00 

Clinton P. Knight, Jr 1,000.00 

Philip L. Leidy 100.00 

J. Sidney Marine 10.00 

William L. Martwick 25.00 

Ulric J. Mengert 10.00 

I. Thomas Steere 35.00 

Joseph Stokes, Jr 30.00 1,510.00 

Forward 30,004.13 



41 



Forward. 30,004.13 

The Class of 1917 

William Henry Chamberlin 10.00 

Donald Chandler 50.00 

Loring Dam 10.00 

Joseph W. Greene, Jr 25.00 

Albert W. Hall 50.00 

H. Lawrence Jones 10.00 

M. Alexander Laverty 15.00 

Gilbert H. Moore 100.00 

Edmund T. Price 100.00 

E. Roland Snader, Jr 25.00 

John W. Spaeth, Jr 15.00 

Arthur E. Spellissy 50.00 460.00 

The Class of 1918 

Harrison H. Arnold 5.00 

Bennett S. Cooper 15.00 

Robert H. Dann 5.00 

Neil Gilmour 10.00 

Charles- Francis Long 15.00 

Herbert J. Painter 25.00 

Edward A, G. Porter 10.00 

Joseph W. Sharpj3rd 5.00 

John W. Thacher 200.00 

Alfred J. Townsend 5.00 295.00 

The Class of 1919 

William J, Brockelbank 1.00 

Edgar B. Graves 10.00 

Thomas Mc Connell, III 50.00 

Frank V. Morley 100.00 161.00 

The Class of 1920 

Robert W. Burritt 125.00 

Benjamin Collins, Jr 10.00 

Edwin O. Geckeler 25.00 

Pierson P. Harris 5.00 

Horace P. HUl 250.00 

Milton A. Kamsler 35.00 

Norman F. Milne 15.00 

Thomas E. Morris 50.00 

Francis S. Silver 100.00 

Horace F. Spencer 50.00 

Granville E. Toogood 150.00 

Charles W. Ufford 10.00 

Richard R. Wood 25.00 850.00 

The Class of 1921 

Edmund G. Hauff 10.00 

John R. Hoopes 40.00 

J. Barclay Jones 10.00 

Archibald Macintosh 10.00 

William F. Mengert 37.00 ♦ 

Raymond T. Ohl 25.00 

M. Huyett Sangree 10.00 

Benjamin B. Weatherby 25.00 

Robert N. Wood 50.00 217.00 

Forward 31,987.13 



42 



Forward 31,9*7.1 J 

The Class of 1922 

Charles D. Abbott, Jr 10.00 

Andrew Brown 25.00 

Paul C. Crowther 10.00 

Henry S. Fraser 25.00 

John F. Gummere 10.00 

George A. Hilleman 50,00 

Robert R. Matzke 5.00 

Frederick S. Miller 10.00 

Elliston P. Morris 10.00 

Harry W. Pfund 50.00 

William L. Rhoads, Jr 5.00 

Richard M. Sutton 20.00 

Edward A. Taylor 5.00 

Kenneth B. Walton 100.00 

J. Colvin Wright 25.00 

Edwin W. Zerrer 10.00 370.00 

The Class of 1923 

H. Tatnall Brown, Jr 5.00 

Hal G. Farrar 25.00 

Gilbert C. Frey 100.00 

Edward K. Haviland 10.00 

C. Dixon Heyer 20.00 

Rees S. Himes 5.00 

Garrett S. Hoag 25.00 

William C. Hunsicker, Jr 10.00 

Wilmot R. Jones 25.00 

S. Brooks Knowlton 5.00 

Thomas Parke 25.00 

John B. Stevenson 5.00 

Gordon W. Strawbridge 10.00 

C. Bevan Strayer 3.00 

Wayne M. Wagenseller 10.00 

Charles Warner, Jr 100.00 383.00 

The Class of 1924 

Charles F. Bader, Jr 11.00 

Courtland B. Brinton 15.00 

J. Stanton Carson 50.00 

Howard Comfort 20.00 

Thomas S. Ellis 10.00 

Harold .D. Greenwell 25.00 

Stanley B. Hastings 5.00 

Wesley M. Heilman 50.00 

Philip G. Rhoads 100.00 

Edward P. Van Tine 25.00 

W. Nelson West, 3rd 25.00 336.00 

The Class of 192 5 

Eric G. Ball 10.00 

Francis C. Barton, Jr 10.00 

Geoffrey Billo 18.50 * 

Leigh E. Chadwick 5.00 

John S. C. Harvey, Jr. . . 25.00 

Henry F. House 10.00 

Jesse T. Nicholson 25.00 

Owen B. Rhoads 200.00 

John A. Silver 200.00 

Louis E. Taubel 5.00 

Austin Wright 7.50 516.00 

Forward 33,592.13 

43 



Forward 33,592.13 

The Class of 1926 

John B. Calkin 10.00 

Francis F. Campbell 10,00 

Alexander R. Carman, Jr 25.00 

Henry C. Evans 10.00 

Charles H. Green 74.00 * 

Siddons Harper, Jr 10.00 

Robert L. Hatcher 5.00 

Harris G. HavUand 15.00 

I. Lloyd Hibberd 10.00 

Benjamin H. Lowry 10.00 

WUlard E. Mead 50,00 

Edward S. Wood, Jr 25.00 254.00 

The Class of 1927 

Herman E. Compter 5.00 

Daniel M. Coxe 5.00 

Allan B. Fay' 25.00 

Albert V. Fowler 15.00 

William S. Halstead 10.00 

John L, Heller 5,00 

John C. Lober 20,00 

Paul W, Ohl 20.00 

Ira B. Rutherford 20.00 

S. Stansfeld Sargent 5.00 

Watson Scarborough 2.00 

Wallace B. Totten 10.00 142.00 

The Class of 1928 

Carl F. Berlinger 25.00 

Fred M. Burgess 5.00 

Joiin T. Evans 5.00 

John O. Fitzsimmons 10.00 

Nelson J. Hogenauer 5.00 

Allen F. Horton 25.00 

John A. H. Keith 50.00 

J. McLain King 7.50 

Henry S. Murphey 5.00 

Ingram H. Richardson 30.00 

Charles A. Robinson .' 25.00 

Robert L. Shank 25.00 

Franklin W. Smith 10.00 

Ellsworth B. Stevens 10.00 

Charles M. Tatum 10.00 

Allen C. Thomas, Jr 10.00 

Theo Vanneman 100.00 

Theodore Whittelsey, Jr 5.00 

Richard Wistar 10.00 

John W. Won 10.00 382.50 

The Class of 1929 

Theodore E. Baker 25.00 

Samuel T. Brinton 10.00 

John R. Cooper 25.00 

Herbert K; Ensworth 5.00 

George S. Garrett 15.00 

John G. Hartman 5.00 

Davis D. Lewis 7.50 



Forward 92.50 34,370.63 



44 



1 



Forward . 34,370.63 

The Class of 1929 (continued) 

Forward 92.50 

Alfred Mellor, 2nd 10.00 

Ralph L. MUler 10.00 

Robert C. Sullivan 5.00 

Daniel D. Test. Jr 2.00 

F. Howell Wright 10.00 129.50 

The Class of 1930 

B. Franklin Blair 10.00 

Arthur H. Brinton 5.00 

Donald R. Buxton 10.00 

W. Clark Hanna 5.00 

John D. Hymes 10.00 

Frank W. Lindsay 3.00 

Brewster Morris 15.00 

J. Howard Morris, Jr 25.00 

Edward Rosewater 20.00 

Harlow B. Rowell 10.00 

Thomas Wistar, Jr 12.00 125.00 

The Class of 1931 

Richard Baker 10.00 

Thomas Burns 10.00 

Alfred R. Crawford 5.00 

George B. Edgar 10.00 

Donald L. Gibson 5.00 

Thomas B. Harvey 25.00 

James M. Houston 25.00 

WUliam M. Maier 25.00 

Harris Shane 10.00 

Edwin A. Speakman 10.00 

Walter M. Teller 100.00 

John H. Wills 20.00 

Evan M. Wilson 50.00 305.00 

The Class of 1932 

Carl B. Allendoerfer 5.00 

Walter C. Baker 25.00 

Ryde W. Ballard 10.00 

Wilson Bennett 5.00 

Richard D. Browne 10.00 

James W. Burger 3.00 

Walter I. Dothard, Jr 20.00 

Harry Fields 25.00 

C. Robert Haines 10.00 

Arthur S. Roberts 25.00 

Harold Schramm 100.00 

Wallace M. Scudder 50.00 

John W. Settle, Jr 10.00 

William V. Sipple, Jr 5.00 

Albert K. Smiley 10.00 

Charles S. Strickler 10.00 

A. Craig Succop 10.00 333.00 

The Class of 1933 

Horace K. Dugdale 100.00 

Henry B. Gilbert 2.00 



Forward 102.00 35,263.13 



45 



Forward 35,263.13 

The Class of 1933 (continued) 

Forward 102,00 

Stephens T. Gulbrandsen 5.74 

Patrick H. Hodgkin 10.00 

R. Wilfred Kelsey 10.00 

John W. Masland 10.00 

John Monsarrat 10.00 

Edward A. Moos 10.00 

Hugh B. Pickard 15.00 

John R. Sargent 10.00 

Henry Scattergood 10.00 

Howard D. Sordon, Jr 5.00 

Robert C. Thomson, Jr 10.00 

Henry J. Vaux 2.00 209.74 

The Class of 1934 

Robert C. Atmore 10.00 

Fritz K. Downey 5.00 

Louis W. Flaccus, Jr 10.00 

J. Morton Fultz, Jr 5.00 

Leonard L. Greif, Jr 100.00 

Ellwood M. Hammaker 5.00 

John O. Hancock 2.00 

R. Bruce Jones 3.00 

J. Douglas Lockard 5.00 

Benjamin S. Loewenstein 20.00 

David G. Loomis 30.00 

William F. Maxfield 10,00 

Malcolm D. McFarland 5.00 

Robert W. McKee 5.00 

Richard R, Pleasants, Jr 10.00 

Frank T. Siebert, Jr, ' 10,00 

Arthur G, Singer, Jr 10,00 

Bruce D, Smith 5.00 

William W. Smith 25,00 

H, Miles Snyder 25,00 

Matt W, Stanley 10.00 

John C, Wilson 5.00 315,00 

The Class of 1935 

William L. Azpell Jr 10,00 

David H, Bates 10,00 

William R. Bowden 10,00 

Meredith B, Colket, Jr 7,00 

William H, Herman, Jr 15.00 

E, Charles Kunkel, Jr 10.00 

Edward J. Matlack 10,00 

V. Putnam Morgan 5.00 

John B. Rhoads 100.00 

Graham Rohrer 25.00 

Frederic N. Rolf 10.00 

Rowland G. Skinner 15,00 

Philip P. Steptoe 15,00 

William S. Stoddard 5,00 

Francis Joseph Stokes, Jr 20.00 

Robert P, Wills 10.00 

Alexander C, Wood, HI 20.00 297.00 

Forward 36,084.87 



46 



Forward 36,084.87 

The Class of 1936 

Robert W. Baird, Jr 50.00 

Henry C. Beck 5.00 

Jonathan A. Brown 10.00 

William R. Brown, 3rd 5.00 

Daniel F. Coogan, Jr 5.00 

Ben T. Cowles 9.00 

Arthur S. Dulaney, Jr 25.00 

Francis C. Evans 20.00 

Milton F. Glessner 25.00 

Samuel Kind 4.00 

William H. Loesche, Jr 2.00 

William A. Macan, IH 10.00 

David P. McCune 25.00 

Park H. Miller, Jr 5.00 

John L. Parker 2.00 

James W. Pearce, Jr 5.00 

WUliam E. Sheppard, n 5.00 

Joseph H. Taylor. 2.00 

George Thomas, Jr 5.00 

Henry L. Tomkinson 5.00 

John Van Brunt 5.00 

Robert B. Wolf 25.00 

Harry M. Zuckert, In Memory of Robert Martin Zuckert. . . 100.00 354.00 

The Class of 1937 

John A. Cantrell 5.00 

Hans B. Engleman 10.00 

Roger L. Greif 100.00 

Bernard M. Hollander 5.00 

Robert H. Krieble 10.00 

Edgar M. Rector 25.00 155.00 

The Class of 1938 

Thomas A. Benham 50.00 

Robert M. Bird, Jr 15.00 

Richard S. Bowman 20.00 

R, Franklin Brattan 50.00 

Donald S. Childs, Jr 15.00 

William H. Clark, Jr 10.00 

William S. Currie, Jr 10.00 

Aubrey C. Dickson, Jr 20.00 

William Duff 10.00 

Charles R. Ebersol 25.00 

Roderick Firth 5.00 

S. Knox Harper 5.00 

George L. Hartenstein 5.00 

Louis B. Kohn, II 25.00 

William H. Luden, Jr 5.00 

George Mathues 2.00 

Elliott H. Morse 5.00 

L. Folsom Norsworthy 50.00 

Lindley B. Reagan 2.00 

Leslie B. Schramm 50.00 

Philip R. Shank 25.00 

Thomas Cooper Tatman 50.00 

Hubert R. Taylor 5.00 

Louis James Velte, Jr 10.00 

WUliam M. Webb 20.00 

E. Hambleton Welbourn 20.00 

Lawrence G. Wesson, Jr 6.00 515.00 

Forward 37,108.87 



47 



Forward 37,108.87 

The Class of 1939 

William S. Bonham 

George D. Bown 

James H, Bready 

Nathaniel H. Evans 

Robert Herr 

John J. Jaquette 

William W. McCune 

O. Naylor Rambo, Jr 

F. Peter Rohrmayer 

Craig M. Sharpe 

Laird H. Simons, Jr 

Robert E. Spaulding 

Gilbert P. Talbot 

D. Norton Williams 25.00 257.00 

The Class of 1940 

Bruce D. Anderton 

Henry P. Balivet, Jr 

David P. Flaccus 

Robert H. Goepp 

John £. Gross 

Hanford M. Henderson, Jr 

John T. Hoffman 

Robert J. Hunn 

John M. Lindley, Jr 

Elliott Mason 

Hayden Mason 

Samuel G. M. Maule 

William F. McDevit 

Charles K. Peters 

Thomas M. Taft 

James A. Vincent 5.00 265.00 

The Class of 1941 

Edward P. Allinson, Jr 

Stephen B. Andrus 

David B. Arnold 

Robert P. Arthur 

Arthur G. Ashbrook 

H. Richard Blackwell 

Torrence H. Chambers 

John B. Clark 

Herbert Lee Clement 

Hunt Davis 

John W, Dorsey 

Edward L. Engelhardt 

Louis J. Finger. 

J. David Garmey 

R. Bruce Harley 

Geoffrey Hemphill 

John B. Hlbbard 

H. Kelman Holmes 

Andrew F. Inglis 

Benton D. King 

Shiu Keung Lee 

William A. Llddell, Jr 

Thomas Little 



10.00 


10.00 


2.00 


10.00 


25.00 


5.00 


25.00 


10.00 


5.00 


5.00 


100.00 


20.00 


5.00 


25.00 


10.00 


25.00 


10.00 


5.00 


10.00 


5.00 


5.00 


25.00 


5.00 


10.00 


25.00 


15.00 


50.00 


10.00 


50.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


12.00 


100.00 


5.00 


7.50 


10.00 


5.00 


10.00 


5.00 


4.00 


25.00 


25.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


25.00 


15.00 


2.00 


15.00 


3.00 


15.00 


5.00 



Forward. . 313.50 37,630.87 



48 



Forward 37,630.87 

The Class of 1941 (continued) 

Forward 313.50 

William K. Miller 10.00 

George L. Mosse 10.00 

Samuel M. Murphy, Jr 10.00 

Wilson Hunt Pile 2.00 

Paul C. Rowland . 5.00 

Malcolm K. Smith 20.00 

Robert H. Smith 25.00 

Samuel M. Snipes 1.00 

William W. Stainton 10.00 

G. Ralph Strohl, Jr. 10.00 

Roy S. Vogt , 80.00 

John L. Webb 5.00 

James M. Willis . 25.00 

Kenneth A. Wright 75.00 

Howard E. Ziegler, Jr 10.00 611.50 

The Class of 1942 

James Neal Addoms 5.00 

Warren D. Anderson 2.00 

B. Burns Brodhead 5.00 

Norman S. Brous 25.00 

Knox Brown 5.00 

John A. Clark 25.00 

Edgar R. Emery 5.00 

John D. Farquhar 5.00 

John J. Frazier 10.00 

John A, Fust 5.00 

James F. Gary 25.00 

Heber R. Harper 18.50 * 

Gordon Howe 10.00 

Linwood T. Lawrence 25.00 

James P. Magill, In Memory of James P. Magill, II ...... 500.00 

Malcolm H. McGann, Jr 20.00 

Robert E. Miller, Jr 5.00 

Clyde K. Nichols, Jr. 5.00 

Charles A. Olson, Jr. 18.50 * 

G. M. Courts Oulahan 5.00 

Thor N. Rhodin, Jr 5.00 

Lewis Paul Saxer 10.00 

Franklin P. Sweetser 50.00 

W. Scott Worrall 5.00 794.00 

The Class of 1943 

Eugene E. Anderson, Jr 30.00 

Arthur H. Bell 5.00 

Tristram P. Coffin 10.00 

Sumner W, Ferris 25.00 

James B. Gilbert 10.00 

Douglas R. Hallett 35.00 

David B. Kirk 10.00 

H. Mather Lippincott, Jr 5.00 

Ellis F. Little 10.00 

Robert MacCrate 50.00 

John C. Marsh 5.00 

Avrel Mason 25.00 

John H. Meader 10.00 



Forward 230.00 39,036.37 



49 



Forward 

The Class of 1943 (continued) 

Forward 

George F. Morse 

Sterling Newell, Jr 

Frank K. Otto 

Alan S. Rogers 

William F. Shihadeh 

John G. Shinn 

John W. Thacher, Jr 

Alexander C. Tomlinson, Jr 

John C. Whitehead 

Carl E. Widney 

John B. WUkie 

The Class of 1944 

C. Webster Abbott of J 

Charles Seymour Alden 

Donald W. Baird. 

Jodie D. Crabtree, Jr 

Henry R. Eager 

Charles Edwin Fox, Jr 

Manuel J. Gomez 

James C. Haden 

Walter Hollander, Jr 

William McC. Houston 

Edward B. Irving, Jr 

John S. Klein . . .% 

Arnold R. Post 

H. Royer Smith, Jr 

Samuel E. Stokes, Jr 

Spencer R. Stuart 

H. Craig Sutton, Jr 

Harvey Wigfield 

The Class of 1945 

Crede C. Calhoun 

Richard W. Cole 

Francis E, Fairman, 3rd 

Henry H. Fetterman 

Samuel M. Fox, HI 

David Y. Y. Hsia 

Vernon M. Root 

James B. Wright 

Mr. & Mrs. Mark L. Wright, In Memory of Mark L Wright Jr. 

Special Bequests 

Class of 1925 

Founders Club 

Haver ford Society of Maryland 

Haver ford Society of New England 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association of Haverford College 

Haverford Society of Washington 

Thomas O. Jones 

Mrs. Marguerite Crespi Marsh 

Mrs. Lydia C. Sharpless 

Edmund H. Stinnes 

Anonymous 

Total 

*War Bond 



39,036.37 



230.00 
50.00 
25.00 
30.00 
10.00 
18.50* 
10.00 

5.00 
50.00 
50.00 
75.00 

5.00 



25.00 

50.00 

40.00 

10.00 

25.00 

25.00 

5.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

50.00 

5.00 

50.00 

20.00 

100.00 

25.00 

50.00 

10.00 



5.00 

30.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

15.00 

S.OO 

30.00 



420.65 

200.00 

25.00 

26.00 

14.00 

30.00 

25.00 

50.00 

200.00 

900.00 

18.50* 



558.50 



515.00 



110.00 



1.909.15 
$42,129.02 



50 



REPORT OF 

HAVER FORD COLLEGE LOAN FUND 

Established 1926 

Report No. 19 August 31, 1945 

Current Year 1944-45 

Cash Balance on hand, August 31, 1944 $ 9,373.36 

18 Loans repaid during year 3,180.00 

33 part payments on loans during year 1,731.57 

Interest received during year 757.69 

From Montgomery Merryman, '33 - Interest previously charged off 50.00 

From R. Hill, '45 - Overpayment .02 

15,092.64 

4 Loans made during year $ 665.00 

Repayment to The Corporation of Haverford College 4,000.00 4,665.00 

Cash Balance on hand August 31, 1945 10,427.64 

Loans outstanding August 31, 1945 (Exhibit 7) . . . 12,695.33 

Interest outstanding August 31, 1945 (Exhibit 7) 481.03 

Balance in Merion Title & Trust Co 630.88 

Total Resources August 31, 1945 $24,234.88 

Total to August 31, 1945 

Appropriations from Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fimd 20,812.04 

1st Donation from Class of 1911 641.30 

2nd Donation from Class of 1911 137.90 

3rd Donation from Class of 1911 . 28.85 

Donation from Class of 1929 350.27 

Donation from A. R. Katz 500.00 

Donation from Class of 1927 900.00 

Donation from Class of 1908 1,507.96 

Gift from C. C. Norris 50.00 

Gift from John Charles 300.00 

Gift, Anonymous 500.00 

Gift, Anonymous 2,000.00 

Gift, Haverford Society of Maryland 100.00 

Gift, Dr. H. S. Arthur 300.00 

Adjustment on August 31, 1944 2.82 

308 loans repaid. 45,018.43 

421 payments on loans 17,030.52 

Interest paid up 12,913.87 

Payments from Merion Title & Trust Co. - 2/28/33 $ 42.06 

1/4/38 84.12 

12/31/40 42.06 

7/22/43 42.06 210.30 

From Montgomery Merryman, '33 - Interest on account, 

previously charged off 50.00 

From R. Hill, '45 - Overpayment .02 

Total Receipts 103,354.28 

Repayments to The Corporation of Haverford College. . $15,000.00 

Repayments of Donations 1,708.05 

Original Funds in Merion Title & Trust Co 841.18 

Check Tax 1.66 

Loans Made , 75,375.75 92,926.64 

Cash Balance August 31, 1945 10,427.64 

Outstanding interest to August 31, 1945 481.03 

Outstanding loans to August 31, 1945 12,695.33 

Balance of Merion Title & Trust Co 630.88 

Total Resources August 31, 1945 $24,234.88 
51 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



FUNDS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 



GENERAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1847 with subscriptions of $50,000 by a number of Friends. Addi- 
tions were made as follows: 1868, from an anonymous source, $5,000; 1869, 
bequest of Ann Haines to increase the compensation of professors, $2,670; 1870, 
bequest of Richard D. Wood, $18,682.96; 1872, from William Evans, $1,000; 
1874, from executors of Jesse George, deceased', $5,000; 1880, bequest of Dr. 
Joseph \V. Taylor. $5,000; 1901. legacy of Ann Williams. $2,425.50; 1941. 
from children of Aul)rey C. Dickson in his ineiiuiry. $,^!)(). Present l)ook value, 
$93,753.86. The income is used for salaries and scholarships. 

JOHN FARNUM MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1878 by the heirs of John Farnum by gift of $25,000 as a memorial 
to him. Added to in 1899 by legacy of $10,000 from Elizabeth H. Farnum, widow 
of John Farnum. Present book value, $34,689.85. The income only is to be used 
to endow a "professorship of some practical science or literature." The chair of 
chemistry was designated as the "John Farnum Professor of Chemistry." The 
principal is held in the name of three Trustees for the benefit of The Corporation 
of Haverford College. 

JOHN M. WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1880 by bequest of $10,000 from John M. Whitall, Sr. Present 
book value, $10,252.18. The bequest is upon the condition that the art of drawing, 
especially mechanical drawing, shall be taught, and the income only is to be used, 
and for this purpose. 

DAVID SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $40,000 from David Scull, Sr. Present book 
value, $43, 173.04. The income only is to be used to endow a professorship. The 
chair of biology was designated as the "David Scull Professor of Biology." 

EDWARD L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1865 by net bequest of $9,500 from Edward L. Scull, '64. The legacy 
was added to the General Endowment Fund, but in 1888 it was set apart as a 
separate fund. Present book value, $10,950.03. The income only is to be used. 
The bequest is free from any legally bmding conditions, but it was the testator's 
desire "that some judicious means shall be employed by the Managers to further 
advise students on the subjects of diet and reading." 

WISTAR MORRIS MEMORLAL FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $5,000 in bonds by Mary Morris, widow of Wistar 
Morris, as a memorial to him. Present book value, $4,956.69. There are no 
restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ISRAEL FRANKLIN WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1896 by net legacy of $9,667.83 from Israel Franklin Whitall. Pres- 
ent book value, $10,388.86. The income only is to be used for the payment of 
professors or teachers. 



52 



JACOB P. JONES ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1897 by residuary legacy of Jacob P. Jones. This amounted when 
received to par value of $279,021.60; book value, $332,301.60, and sundry real 
estate. The real estate has all been sold, netting $847,709.92. Present book 
value, $1,253,030.25. The income only is to be used for general college purposes, 
and out of said income there shall be admitted a portion at least of the students 
either free of charge or at reduced rates. In accordance with this provision, about 
$7,500 per annum is used for scholarships, and the balance of income for general 
college purposes. Jacob P. Jones' will contains the following: "My hope is that 
under the blessing and favor of God there will come from this source a revenue 
which shall be productive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help 
at this critical period of their lives to many deserving young men of slender 
patrimony." 

JOHN FARNUM BROWN FUND FOR THE STUDY OF THE 

BIBLE, BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE, 

PHILOSOPHY, AND KINDRED SUBJECTS 

Founded in 1900 by the late T. Wistjar Brown as a memorial to his son, John 
Farnum Brown, '93. The original gift was in cash and securities of a par value of 
$43,000, shortly afterwards increased by further gifts of $15,000. The founder 
made further gifts of cash and securities until 1915, the total being $19,381 cash 
and $48,500 par of securities with book value of $41,490. His total gifts therefore 
had a book value of $234,970.81. Of this, $5,000 donated in 1910 is for endowment 
of prizes in Biblical History and in Philosophy. A portion of the income was 
capitalized each year to keep intact the full value of the fund until 1940 when 
this fund was included in the Consolidation of funds. Present book value, 
$265,841.10. The income only is to be used for the purpose of making provision 
for the regular study of the Bible and Biblical History and Literature, and as 
way opens for religious teaching. In 1910, the scope and title of the Fund were 
enlarged to include "and Philosophy and Kindred Subjects." Income up to $200 
may be used for prizes in Biblical Literature and Philosophy. 

ELLEN WALN FUND 

Founded in 1900 by legacy of $10,000 from Ellen Wain. Present book value, 
$10,711.80. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

CLEMENTINE COPE ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1904 by bequest of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book 
value, $20,710.06. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

NATHAN BRANSON HILL TRUST 

Founded in 1904 by deposit with First National Bank and Trust Co., Min- 
neapolis, Minn., trustee, of a paid-up life insurance policy for $5,000 by Samuel 
Hill, 78, being in memory of his father, Nathan Branson Hill. The income is to 
be used to aid in the maintenance of Haverford College so long as it shall remain 
under the auspices of the Society of Friends. In 1931, Samuel Hill died and the 
policy realized $5,039. Present book value, $5,134.16. 

JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $50,000 from Joseph E. Gillingham. Present 
book value, $40,849.10. The testator said, "I request, but I do not direct, that 
part of the income of this legacy may be used for free scholarships for meritorious 
students." In accordance with this request, $800 is appropriated annually from 
the income for scholarships, the balance being used for general college purposes. 



S3 



HENRY NOKRIS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $5,000 from Henry Norris. Present book value, 
$5,671.42. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

ELIZABETH H. FARNUM FUND 

Founded in 1891. The original principal of this fund, amounting to $10,000, 
was held by the Provident Trust Co. of Philadelphia under a deed of trust created 
by Elizabeth H. Farnum of Philadelphia. The income was first paid to a life 
tenant until 1914, when income first accrued to the College "for the payment of 
the salaries of teachers and professors by the said College employed." Under 
date of Ninth Month 18, 1944, upon petition of the Trustee, concurred in by the 
College, the Court of Common Pleas awarded the principal to the Corporation 
of Haverford College "to be administered by it for the purposes set forth in the 
deed of trust in accordance with the non-profit corporation law." Present book 
value, $9,160.24. 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $10,000 from James R. Magee, '59, and added 
to in 1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1937, 1940, and 1944 by addi- 
tional payments of $29,182.84, $1,694.84, $499.31, $499.68, $488.85, $207.33, $400, 
$250, $100, $449.89, and $175.00. under his legacy. Present book value, $43,184.70. 
There are no restrictions except that the income only is to be used. This is 
applied to general college purposes. 

ALBERT K. SMILEY FUND 

Founded in 1'915 by gift of $1,000 from Daniel Smiley, '78, as a memorial to 
his brother, Albert K. Smiley, '49, and added to in 1924 and 1926. Present book 
value, $1,445.31. There are no restrictions except that preference was expressed 
that the income only should be used. This is applied to general college purposes. 

THE HINCHMAN ASTRONOMICAL FUND 

Founded in 1917 by bequest of $10,000 par value securities from Charles S. 
Hinchman. Increased in 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936 
by donations of $28,926.95 from a friend of the College. Present book value, 
$38,074.84. The income only to be used "to increase the salary of the astronomical 
professorship so as to provide a suitable instructor in the ennobling study of the 
heavens." 

WALTER D. AND EDITH M. L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1918 by bequest of Walter D. Scull, whose death followed shortly 
after the death of his sister, Edith M. L. Scull. Each left his or her estate to the 
other, unless predeceased; in this latter case both American estates were left to 
Haverford College. Both were children of Gideon D. Scull, '43, and resided in 
England. Income accumulated before the receipt of the fund by the College 
amounted to $16,887.66, of which $15,078.51 was added to the principal of the 
fund. Present book value, $168,196.24. The fund was created to establish a pro- 
fessorship of modern English constitutional history, and the chair has been 
designated as the Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professorship of History. 

ALBIN GARRETT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by legacy of $25,000 from Mary Hickman Garrett, in memory 
of her late husband, Albin Garret, '64. Present book value, $25,795.00. There are 
no restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ARNOLD CHASE SCATTERGOOD MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $30,000 in securities from Maria Chase Scattergood 
in memory of her son, Arnold Chase Scattergood, of the Class of 1919, who died 
in his Junior year. Present book value, $23,492.69. The income only is to be used 
toward the payment of professors' salaries. 



FRANCIS B. GUMMERE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. This fund was started by a gift of $25,000 from the late Miss 
Emily H. Bourne, of New York, conditional upon the raising of $100,000 addi- 
tional for an endowment of the Chair of English Literature in memory of her 
friend. Professor Francis Barton Gummere. A committee of alumni, consisting of 
J. Stogdell Stokes, '89, chairman; E. R. Tatnall, '07, treasurer; Hans Froelicher, 
'12, secretary; Charles J. Rhoads, '93; Alfred M. Collins, '97; Winthrop Sargent, 
Jr., '08, and Parker S. Williams, '94, working with President Comfort, organized 
a comprehensive campaign among the alumni and friends of the College to raise 
$375,000 for this purpose and for increase of professors' salaries; the first $100,000 
of unspecified gifts was used to complete the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund to at least $125,000, and the balance comprised the Isaac Sharpless Memo- 
rial Fund. Total, book value, $120,991.54. 

ISAAC SHARPLESS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. The alumni of the College conducted during 1920 a campaign 
for $375,000 additional endowment for the College to make possible additional 
salaries to the professors. Appeal was made to found two new funds, the Francis B. 
Gummere Memorial Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The funds 
received, except where otherwise specified, were first applied to the completion 
of the former up to $125,000 (see above). Specified gifts and donations thereafter 
received were then applied to the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The income 
only is to be used for salaries of professors. Total book value, $210,754.11. 

GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD FUND 

The General Education Board of New York appropriated $125,000 in 1920 to 
the campaign for increase of endowment when the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund, totaling $375,000, were raised. In- 
terest at five per cent was paid on the full sum for three years, and the $125,000 
in full payment was completed in 1926-1927. Total book value, $121,480.36. 

HAVERFORD IMPROVEMENT FUND AND CONSOLIDATED 
CAMPUS HOUSES ACCOUNT 

Founded in 1922 to hold the Corporation's undivided share in College Lane land 
and eight houses. This property was turned over to the Corporation free of debt 
on Third Month 17, 1922, and with same the then debt of the Corporation amount- 
ing to $155,942.15 was liquidated. The fund started with an undivided interest of 
$19,000. There was added in 1922, $9,000; and in 1925, $2,000. In 1926, $5,000 of 
this fund was sold and the proceeds were appropriated for the alterations to 
Roberts Hall. The balance of this fund, $25,000, was also used in 1927 for the 
same purpose. The income was used for general college purposes. It is hoped 
that this fund may be refunded from the Centenary Campaign, a part of which 
was planned to cover the Roberts Hall alterations. 

The College Lane land was purchased in 1886 for the benefit of the College by 
David Scull, Justus C. Strawbridge, Richard Wood and Francis Stokes, Managers 
of the College and now all deceased. With contributions raised by them and by 
mortgages on which they went on the bonds, funds were raised to build six dwelling 
houses, and two houses were built by the Corporation itself. From the income of 
the houses the debt against the properties was gradually reduced until it was 
entirely liquidated in 1919. The net income from 1919 until 1922, when the 
property was turned over to the Corporation, was applied toward the reduction 
of the Corporation's debt. 

As of Ninth Month 1, 1944, all of these eight College Lane houses, together 
with seven houses which had been bought for the College and formed a part of 
the College debt, and nine other Campus houses which were owned free of debt, 
were consolidated at a combined valuation of $281,331.70 into a new Campus 
Houses Account held by Consolidated Investment Account. A return at 4% 
interest is to be credited to income to the College and the balance of net income 
is to be applied in a building fund for the annual reduction of the investment, 
and/or to a depreciation reserve fund to cover extraordinary repairs. 



55 



CENTENARY FUND 

Centenary Fund (1) was founded in 1926 by gifts to the College in anticipation 
of the one hundredth anniversay of its founding in 1833. There were no restric- 
tions and the income was used for general college purposes until 1935, when the 
principal was used in the liquidation of debt. 

In 1935 a further campaign among the Alumni was conducted under the direc- 
tion of William M. Wills, '04, to add to the funds raised in commemoration of the 
Centenary. This was designated as Centenary Fund (2), but in 1935-1936 the 
payment of pledges to (1) were merged with (2) at the request of donors, and the 
two accounts are now considered as one. 

During 1936-1937, $9,000 additional donations were made by members of the 
Strawbridge family, and of these $3,372.63 were transferred for the final cost of 
the William J. Strawbridge '94 Memorial Astronomical Observatory, and $5,627,37 
were set aside to establish the Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund. Other 
additional gifts of $16,017.04 were made in 1936-1937, $7,700 in 1937-1938, $2,150 
in 1938-1939, and $15 in 1939-1940 bringing the totals contributed to both funds 
to date, for the Observatory $47,000, and for other uses $145,947.55. 

From the $16,017.04, together with $1,550 realized from a previous gift of an 
investment, the balance of the debt for pension contributions $12,022.57 was met, 
$5,544.47 was applied to the debt for accrued deficits, $7,700 was applied to the 
npcratiiiK year 1937-1938. and $2,150 to that of 1938-1939, $15.00 to that of 
1939-1940, and $11.34 for 1940-1941, and $50 for 1943-1944. 

There remained one investment in this fund not yet realized upon with a book 
value of $231.06. At end of 1943-44 this was absorbed into Consolidated Investment 
Account, and the debt reduced further by $231.06. 

WILLIAM PENN FOUNDATION 

Started in 1926 toward a fund of $120,000 to establish a chair or lectureship in 
Political Science and International Relations. This fund forms a part of the Cen- 
tenary program to raise $1,000,000. This foundation is to be devoted, at the dis- 
cretion of the Managers, to providing adequate undergraduate instruction in the 
theory and practice of our own and other governments, in the history of past 
attempts to secure international agreements and in the methods by which good 
international understanding may be promoted and maintained. Book value to 
date, $98,346.29. 

WALTER CARROLL BRINTON MEMORLAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $5,000 by the family of Walter Carroll Brinton, 
Class of 1915, who died in France Twelfth Month 8, 1918, while engaged in 
Friends' Reconstruction Work. The fund sustained the Walter Carroll Brinton 
Scholarship until 1926-1927. It was then increased $6,000 by further gifts of the 
founders, and at their request the purpose was changed from a scholarship fund 
to form a separately named fund of the William Penn Foundation, with its income 
to be used for the same objects. Present book value, $13,610.80. 

CORPORATION FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $70,000 of proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and at the southeastern corner of the College 
farm. In 1937, the fund was increased $8,810, being proceeds of the sale of 1.762 
acreas of land to the Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society for their new 
ice skating rink. Present book value, $77,093.02. The fund is invested and the 
income used for general college purposes, until otherwise directed by the Managers. 

ELIZABETH J. SHORTRIDGE FUND 

Founded in 1930 by bequest from Elizabeth J. Shortridge, without restrictions. 
The fund is invested, and until otherwise directed by the Managers, the income 
only is used for general purposes. Present book value, $9,635.43. 



56 



HOWARD COMFORT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1934 and added to in 1935, 1936, and 1937 by donations totaling 
$5,000 from President William Wistar Comfort in memory of his father, Howard 
Comfort, Class of 1870, who was a Manager from 1880 until his death in 1912, 
and Secretary of the Board of Managers from 1884 until 1908. The income only 
is to be used, and for general purposes. Present book value, $4,844.02. 

EMMA RIDGWAY COMLY FUND 
Founded 1935 by bequest of $50,000 from Emma Ridgway Comly, a Philadel- 
phia Friend. The bequest was unrestricted as to both principal and income. The 
income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $48,165.07. 

ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 

Founded 1935 by bequest of $20,000 and her residuary estate from Ellen W. 
Longstreth, a Friend belonging to Haverford Meeting, and living in Bryn Mawr. 
The principal and income are both unrestricted. The bequest of $20,000 and resid- 
uary $84,416.28 in 1935-36, together with further realization on residuary assets, 
viz. $3,338.69 in 1936-37, $73.23 in 1938, $166.80 in 1942-43, and $258.00 in 1943 
-44, make a total of $108,253.10. There are some participations in real estate not 
yet liquidated, which will increase or decrease this fund. The income is used for 
general purposes, with a usual allotment of $300 for Quaker books. Present book 
value, $103,186.24. 

ALBERT L. BAILY FUND 

Founded in 1936 by an unrestricted bequest of $5,000 from Albert L. Daily, 
'78. The income is usee for general purposes. Present book value, $4,81 7.71. 

ELIZABETH B. WISTAR WARNER FUND 

Founded First Month 16, 1937, by unrestricted bequest of $4,950 from Elizabeth 
B. Wistar Warner, of Germantown, widow of George M. Warner, '73. The income 
is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4,769.54. 

T. ALLEN HILLES BEQUEST 

Founded First Month 19, 1937, by receipt of the proceeds of a trust fund created 
in 1935 by T. Allen Hilles, class of-1870, formerly of Wilmington, Delaware, re- 
cently of Glen Mills, Pa., who died 11th Month 15, 1935. The amount received 
in stocks and cash was $285,000. Proceeds of mortgages of $7,460.94 in 1938, and 
final cash from executor in 1939 of $1,603.37 brought the gross total to $294,064.31. 
From this was deducted in 1939 the final settlement of taxes and fees totalling 
$13,300, thus making the final net bequest $280,764.31. Accumulated income of 
$12,489.77 was also received on First Month 19, 1937. In the trust created by the 
donor in 1935 he provided: "The gift to Haverford College shall constitute a fund 
to be known as 'The Hilles Bequest,' and the income shall be used for repair, up- 
keep and improvement of the building which 1 have given to Haverford College 
known as the Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science of Haverford College. My 
purpose in making this gift is primarily to relieve the Corporation of Haverford 
College from any additional expense on account of the erection of the building 
which I have given them, and the accompanying expansion of its educational 
activities, but whenever and if the Board of Managers or other governing body 
of the College shall determine it to be for the best interest of the College to devote 
the whole or any part of the income of the fund to uses other than those above 
specified, such income may be applied to such uses and in such manner as the 
Board of Managers or other governing body may in its absolute discretion deter- 
mine." Present book value, $270,528.30. 

LEONARD L. GREIF, JR., AND ROGER L. GREIF FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 29, 1937, by gift of $1,000 from Leonard L. Greif, '34, 
and Roger L. Greif, '37, of Baltimore. The gift was unrestricted, but the Managers 
have set aside this fund as endowment for general purposes, the income only to 
be used, until otherwise determined by them. Present book value, $963.54. 

57 



EDWARD M. WISTAR FUND 

Founded First Month 9, 1938, by gift of $2,500 from Edward M. Wistar. 72. 
for endowment, the income only to be used for general purposes. Present book 
value, $2,408.86. 

MORRIS E. LEEDS FUND 

Founded .Sixth Month 26, 1941, by gift of 400 Participatinp Shares of Leeds 
and Northrup Stock Trust. The fund is unrestricted as to principal and 
interest, but was. ordered by the Managers, until otherwise directed, to be 
included among the funds for General Purposes, the income only to be used. 
Present book value. $.^9,428.52. This fund is subject to an annuity of $1600, 
during the life of its donor. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD FUND 

Founded Tenth Month, 1941, by donations totaling $1,660, made by members 
of the Board of Managers in recognition of the services for 25 years of J. Henry 
Scattergood, '96, as Treasurer of the Corporation of Haverford College. A 
further gift of $340 was made in 1943-44. 

The income of this fund is to be used in the field of International Relations 
and to be at the disposal of the President of the College and the William Penn 
Professor holding the Chair in Political Science and International Relations. 
If the income in any year is not used for the special purposes as stated, in the 
discretion of the President, it may be used for general purposes. It is further 
provided that after Tenth Month 1, 1951 the use of the fund for other purposes, 
both as to principal and income, shall be subject to the direction of the Board of 
Managers of Haverford College. Present book value, $1,979.41. 

FUND FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL 

MOSES BROWN FUND 

A trust founded by T. Wistar Brown, in 1906, as a memorial to his father, 
Moses Brown. Transferred to the College in 1916 after his death, having at that 
time a par value of $372,821.91 and book value of $318,823.56. Present book 
value, $344,521.04. The fund was created to establish a graduate course in reli- 
gious study in harmony with and supplementary to the teaching and study pro- 
vided for by the John Farnum Brown Fund. The income only is to be used ; at 
least ten per cent of the total income must be capitalized each year. The unused 
income, if any, is likewise capitalized at the close of each fiscal year. The graduate 
school supported by the Moses Brown Fund was designated "The Thomas Wistar 
Brown Graduate School." In 1927 the former separate school was discontinued 
and eight graduate scholarships were created. 

In 1937-1938, arrangements were first made for cooperation in courses with 
Pendel Hill, a school for religious education under the care of Friends, located at 
Wallingford, Pa. 

FUNDS FOR INFIRMARY 

INFIRMARY ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1911 from subscriptions totaling $9,072.55, raised among alumni 
and friends of the College. Present book value, $9, 301. 50. The income is used 
toward the expenses of the Morris Infirmary. 

JOHN W. PINKHAM FUND 

Founded in 1911 by legacy of $5,000 from Dr. John W. Pinkham, '60, being 
transmitted by gift from his widow, Cornelia F. Pinkham. Present book value, 
$4,875.05. There are no binding conditions, but as she expressed an interest in the 
Morris Infirmary, then building, the Board of Managers directed that the income 
of this fund should be used in the support and maintenance of the Infirmary. 



58 



FUND FOR HAVEKFORD UNION 

HAVERFORD UNION FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $1,000 par value of bond at book value of $800 and 
$678.59 cash, and all the personal property in the Union from the Haverford 
College Union. The College assumed the responsibility for the care of the building 
First Month 16. 1920. The income is used toward the maintenance of the Union 
building. Present book value, $1,810.3,^. 



FUNDS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

THOMAS P. COPE FUND 

Founded in 1842 by gift of sixty shares of Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co. 
stock, par value $3,000, from Thomas P. Cope. Present book value, $5,066.13. 
The income only is to be used "for the education of young men to qualify them 
to become teachers, but who are not of ability to pay their own schooling " This 
fund sustains the Thomas P. Cope Scholarships. 

EDWARD YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1860 by bequest of $5,000 from Edward Yarnall. Present book valtie, 
$5,847.96. The income only is to be used for "the support of free scholarships." 
The fund sustains the Edward Yarnall Scholarships. 

ISAIAH V. WILLIAMSON FUND 

Founded in 1876 and increased in 1883 by gifts of sundry ground rents from 
Isaiah V. Williamson. Present book value, $19,094.90. The income only is to be 
used for free scholarships. The fund sustains the Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. 

RICHARD T. JONES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $5,000 from Jacob P. Jones as a memorial to 
his late son, Richard T. Jones, '63. Present book value, $4,871.92. The income 
only to be used to sustain the "Richard T. Jones Scholarship." 

MARY M. JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Mary M. Johnson. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $3,062.95. Present book value, 
$6,757.92. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund sus- 
tains the Mary M. Johnson Scholarships. 

SARAH MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Sarah Marshall. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund b>' $2,589.49. Present book value, 
$7,631.02. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund 
sustains the Sarah Marshall Scholarships. 

CLEMENTINE COPE FELLOWSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1899 by gift of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book value 
$22,01 2.96. The gift was to establish the "Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund to as- 
sist worthy and promising graduates of Haverford College in continuing their course 
of study at Haverford or at some other institution of learning in this country or 
abroad." The selection of the Fellows is made by the Board of Managers upon 
nomination by the Faculty. 

ISAAC THORNE JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Founded in 1916 by gift of $5,000 from Isaac Thorne Johnson, '81. Present 

59 



book value, $8,260.53. The gift was to establish "The Isaac Thorne Johnson" 
Scholarship to aid and assist worthy young men of Wilmington Yearly Meeting 
or of the Central West to enjoy the privileges of Haverford College." Unused 
income is added to the principal of the fund. 

CASPAR WISTAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of Edward M. and Margaret C. Wistar of $5,000 par 
value in bonds in memory of their son, Caspar Wistar, of the Class of 1902, who 
died in Guatemala in 1917 while engaged in mission service in that country. The in- 
come only is to be used for scholarships, primarily for sons of parents engaged in 
Christian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations, or 
students desiring preparation for similar service in America or other countries. 
Present book value, $2,843.61. 

J. KENNEDY MOORHOUSE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1926 by gifts totaling $3,000, with $1,000 added in 1926, and $1,000 
in 1928 and $1,000 in 1929 from the Class of 1900 in memory of their classmate, 
J. Kennedy Moorhouse. The scholarship provided by this fund is "to be awarded, 
whenever a vacancy shall occur, to the boy ready to enter the Freshman class, 
who in the judgment of the President of the College appears best fitted to uphold 
at Haverford the standard of character and conduct typified by J. Kennedy Moor- 
house, 1900, as known to his classmates: A man, modest, loyal, courageous, rever- 
ent without sanctimony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in clean 
and joyous living." Present book value, $4,967.88. 

LOUIS JAQUETTE PALMER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1928 by gift of $5,000 from Triangle Society, as follows: 

"The Triangle Society of Haverford College herewith presents to the Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College, a fund of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) to be here- 
after known and designated as the 'Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund'; 

"This fund represents contributions from the members of the Triangle Society 
of Haverford College who have been thus inspired to perpetuate the memory of 
their fellow member, Louis Jaquette Palmer, of the Class of 1894, one of the found- 
ers of the Triangle Society, whom they admired for his cooperative spirit and 
constructive interest in student and community welfare. The fund is placed with 
the Corporation of Haverford College with the understanding: 

"That such student shall be selected from a list of those eligible for entrance to 
Haverford College, who shall have combined in his qualifications the fulfillment 
of such conditions as apply to applicants for the Rhodes Scholarships under the 
terms of its creation, and furthermore that the student so selected and entered in 
Haverford College may continue to receive said scholarship fund throughout his 
course at College, subject to the approval of the Committee, otherwise preference 
shall be given to applications for the Freshman Class; 

"That the selection of said student and the determination of the qualities and 
conditions hereinbefore mentioned shall be subject to the decision and control of 
a committee of three (3), which committee shall be composed of two (2) members 
of the Triangle Society and the President of Haverford College, the said members 
of the Triangle Society to select and recommend the applicants and the committee 
as a whole to determine their qualifications and eligibility. 

"Finally, in the event that no student is selected by the Triangle Society or 
that a vacancy occurs, the income from said funds and any additions shall accumu- 
late as provided under the customary rules and regulations of the Corporation of 
Haverford College." 

Present book value, $4,817.71. 

PAUL W, NEWHALL MEMORLAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established in 1931 by bequest of $5,045.60 from Mary Newhall in memory 
of her father, Paul W. Newhall, a Manager, 1844-48, for the establishment of a 
scholarship fund. The income only to be used for free scholarship purposes. 
Present book value, $4,861.6.'i. 

60 



ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $750. $2,000 each year 1936 to 1940. and in 1942 ; 
$2,500 in 1941; $1,000 in 1943; and $1,000 in 1944; by Harry M. Zuckert, New 
York, in memory of his son, Robert Martin Zuckert, of the Class of 1936, who 
was killed in an accident in June, 1935. The income is to be used for scholarships 
and the donor said, "I should prefer a boy who is a native of New York or 
Connecticut and who now resides in one of those States." Present book value, 
$16,813.65. 

SAMUEL E. HILLES ENDOWMENT 

CREATED BY MINA COLBURN HILLES 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $5,000 from Mrs. Mina Colburn Hilles, of Orlando, 
Fla., in memory of her husband, Samuel E. Hilles, Class of 1874, formerly of 
Cincinnati, who died in 1931. This fund was created under a trust deed with Cen- 
tral Title and Trust Co., Orlando, Fla., to whom annual reports are to be made. 
The income only is to be used for scholarships for worthy students who are un- 
able to finance their expenses at Haverford College. Present book value, $4,834.39. 

CLASS OF 1913 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fourth Month 15, 1937, by gift of $3,000 from Class of 1913 for the 
endowment of scholarship aid. The income only is to be used for scholarship aid, 
to be awarded annually to a worthy student of any undergraduate class. Prefer- 
ence is to be given to sons of members of the Class of 1913 who mav apply and 
who meet the usual requirements of the College. Present book value $2,890.62. 

THE AUGUSTUS TABER MURRAY RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fifth Month 31, 1939 by gift from two anonymous friends of Dr. 
Augustus Taber Murray, '85, by gifts of $20,000 par value of securities subject 
to annuity during their lives, and with permission to use principal for the annuity 
payments, if necessary. 

Upon the deaths of the two annuitants, the remaining principal shall be held 
in a fund, the "Income to be used for scholarships in recognition of the scholarly 
attainments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished Alumnus of Haverford 
College, of the Class of 1885, and for many years a professor of Leland Stanford 
University, the fund to be known as 'The Augustus Taber Murray Research 
Scholarship.' Then scholarships in English literature or philology, the classics, 
German literature or philology (in order of preference) shall be awarded upon such 
terms and conditions as the College may from time to time establish to students 
who have received the bachelor's degree at Haverford College, and shall be 
awarded for the purpose of study in other institutions toward the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy or such degree as may in the future correspond to that degree." 

The amount of the Scholarship is to be $900 a year whenever awarded, and 
only unmarried students are eligible to hold it. Present book value, $21,822.15. 

THE CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Seventh Month 13, 1942 by initial gift of $2,000.00 from the Class 
of 1917, John W. Spaeth, Jr., Treasurer, as a Twenty-fifth Anniversary Gift. 
A further gift of $250.00 was made at the same time to cover the first two years 
of a scholarship of $125.00 per year. Preference is to be given to a son of a member 
of the Class of 1917. The income only is to be used for a scholarship to the extent 
of $150.00 per annum. Further contributions from the members of the Class of 
1917 are to be applied in the following order: 

(1) — To supplement the annual income from the principal sum of $2,000.00, 
so that the annual scholarship stipend shall be $150.00, or as near that sum 
as may be; 

(2) — To add to the principal sum any surplus of thesd annual contributions 
not needed to serve the purpose of (1). Since the scholarship stipend for the years 
1942-1943 and 1943-1944 was already provided for by the additional $250.00 
already contributed by the Class of 1917, the annual contributions from the Class 
in these two years was added at once to the principal sum of $2,000.00, thus 
serving the purpose of (2) above. Contributions of $500 were made in 1944-1945. 
Present book value, $3,514.85. i 

61 



DANIEL B. SMITH FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 6, 1943 by gift of $2,500 from Anna Wharton Wood, of 
Waltham, Mass. Thi? will be increased by a bequest of $2,500 made by Miss Esther 
Morton Smith, of Germantown, Philadelphia, who died Third Month 18, 1942. 

This fund is established by the granddaughters of Daniel B. Smith "in loving 
memory of their grandfather and his intimate association with the early years of 
the College." 

The income is to be used, in the discretion of the Faculty, as an annual scholar- 
ship for some young man needing financial aid in his College course. Preference 
is to be given to a descendant of their father, Benjamin R. Smith, if any such 
should apply. Present book value, $5,000.00. 



SARAH TATUM HILLES MEMORIAL SCHOLAJiSHIP FUND 



Founded Eleventh Month 1, 1943 by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. Hilles 
1888, in memory of his mother "Sarah Tatum Hilles." 

The will directs that the income be used "to provide for such number of annual 
scholarships of $250 each as such income shall be sufficient to create" ; they are 
to be awarded by the Managers upon "needy and deserving students," and to be 
known as "Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships." 

It is estimated that twelve scholars can be thus provided for at present. Present 
book value $75,534.58. 



ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established Second Month 2, 1944 by gift of $200 from Mrs. Elihu Grant to 
supplement the simultaneous transfer of $803.73 to this new fund from Donations 
Account, being the balance of Donations made by Dr. Grant during his lifetime 
to the Beth Shemesh account, and $75.00 realized from the sale of some of his books. 
Mrs. Grant has made a further gift of $1,000 in 1943-44 and $2,000 in 1944-1945. 
And, Grant Foundation, Inc., gave $10,000, also in 1944-45. 

With the donor's approval, the terms of the fund are as follows : 
"Founded in 1944 to commemorate the service to Haverford College of Dr. 
Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938, a member of the College faculty. The income from 
this fund is applied to scholarship assistance to students in the Humanities, pri- 
marily those specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental subjects, 
and is limited to those whose major subject has been approved by the College 
faculty. In special circumstances the income may be utilized to assist those working 
for a post-graduate degree at Haverford College." 

If conditions change, the Managers are given power to change the use of the 
fund. Present book value, $14,078.73. 



62 



FUNDS FOR THE LIBRARY 
ALUMNI LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1863 by contributions from the alumni and other friends of the 
College. In 1909 the unexpended balance (about $5,000) of a fund of $10,000 
raised in 1892, and known as the "New Library Fund," was merged into the 
Alumni Library Fund. Present book value, $16,799.42. The income is used for 
binding and miscellaneous expenses of the Library. 

MARY FARNUM BROWN LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $20,000 from T. Wistar Brown, executor of the 
Estate of Mary Farnum Brown. Additions were made by T. Wistar Brown in 
1894, $10,000 for a lecture fund, and in 1913, $20,000. In 1916, after T. Wistar 
Brown's death, there was added to this fund $34,499.78 par value of securities, 
book value, $30,149.78, being a trust which he had created for this purpose in 
1908 and to which he had made additions in subsequent years. Present book value, 
$65,324.99. The purpose of this fund (except $10,000) is for the increase and 
extension of the Library. The income only is to be used for the purchase of books, 
and one-fifth of same is to be spent for books promoting the increase of Christian 
knowledge. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. The income of $10,000 of the fund is to provide for an annual 
course of lectures upon Biblical subjects designated "The Haverford Library 
Lectures." Unused income from the fund, if any, must be capitalized at the end 
of each fiscal year, 

WILLIAM H. JENKS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1910 by gift of $5,000 from Hannah M. Jenks, widow of William 
H. Jenks. The fund was first known as "Special Library Fund," but after the death 
of Hannah M. Jenks was changed, in 1916, to "William H. Jenks Library Fund." 
Present book value, $4,817.71. The purpose of this fund is that the income shall 
be used for the care of the collection of Friends' books made by William H. Jenks 
and given by his widow to Haverford College, and to make appropriated additions 
thereto. Any income not used for these purposes may be used toward the general 
needs of the Library. 



MARY WISTAR BROWN WILLIAMS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1914 by gift of $20,000 from Parker S. Williams, '94, as a memorial 
to his late wife, Mary Wistar Brown Williams. Present book value, $19,566.40. 
The income only is to be used for the purchase of books for the Library, preferably 
books coming within the classes of history, poetry, art, and English and French 
literature. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. 



ANNA YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1916 by residuary bequest of $13,000 par value of securities with 
book value of $7,110, and one-half interest in suburban real estate from Anna 
Yarnall. Additional amount under bequest was received in 1918. Present book 
value, $167,265.06. The real estate was sold in 1923 and netted the College 
$164,820.50. The bequest was made for the general use of the Library. The 
Testatrix says, "I do not wish to restrict the managers as to the particular applica- 
tion of this fund, but desire them to use the income arising from it as in their 
best judgment and discretion shall seem best, for the purchase of books and manu- 
scripts, book cases, rebinding of books, and, if need be, the principal or portions 
thereof, or the income or portions thereof, for additions to the present Library 
building, or the erection of new Library buildings. I direct that all books pur- 
chased with this fund shall be plainly marked 'Charles Yarnall Memorial' in 
memory of my father, Charles Yarnall." 

63 



F. B. GUM MERE LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $635.47, raised among the students by the Students, 
Association of the College as a memorial to Professor Francis Barton Gummere! 
The income only is to be used to buy for the Haverford College Library books on 
the subjects that he taught or was interested in. 

The student's Association voted also to raise twenty-five dollars for a special 
shelf in the Library to be known as the "F. B. Gummere Memorial Shelf." This 
shelf, with its proper inscription, holds the books purchased by this fund. Present 
book value, $612.30. 



EDMUND MORRIS FERGUSSON, JR., CLASS OF 1920 MEMORL/a FUND 

Founded in 1920 by memorial gift of $1,000 from the family of Edmund Morris 
Fergusson, Jr., Class of 1920, who died at the College in his Senior year. The in- 
come only is to be used for the maintenance and increase of the Library's Depart- 
ment of English and American Literature. The books purchased with the income 
of this fund are marked by a special book-plate indicating its source. Present book 
value, $965.80. 



CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 15, 1938, by gifts totaling $5,250 from members and 
families of the Class of 1888, on the occasion of their fiftieth anniversary. The con- 
ditions of the gift are as follows: 

(1) A fund is to be established, to be known as "THE CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY 
FUND." 

(2) The income only of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of books 
for the Haverford College Library, except as noted below (in Clause 6). 

(3) The fund established now will be added to later by gift or bequest. 

(4) Members of the Class also expect to donate books to the Library, with the 
understanding that when such books are duplicates of books already in the 
Library, they may be exchanged for books needed, or sold, and the money 
so obtained used in the same way as the income of the fund. 

(5) All books purchased by the income of the fund (or obtained as in 4) are to 
be provided with a special book-plate to be furnished by the Class. 

(6) Income from the Class Fund or moneys obtained by sale of duplicate books 
may, when necessary, be used for binding or repair of books designated as 
belonging to the Qass collection. In 1939-1940, additional donation of $500; 
$100 in 1943-1944; and $500 in 1944-1945 were made. The present book value 
is $6,141.02. 

CLASS OF 1918 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Third Month 24, 1938 by gift from the Class of 1918 in commemora- 
tion of their twentieth anniversity. The gift was $1,753.52 of which $500 was spent 
for a portrait of the late Rayner W. Kdsey, Professor of History, who died Tenth 
Month 29, 1934; and the balance of $1,253.52 was used in establishing a new Li- 
brary Fund, the income to be used for books. Present book value, $1,207.83. 



FUNDS FOR PENSIONS 

PRESIDENT SHARPLESS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by contributions from interested friends of the College, finally 
amounting to $40,000. Present book value, $.SQ,733.67. The income is to be used, 
for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President of the Col- 
lege and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may decide. 
The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in said 
fund. 



64 



WILLIAM P. HENSZEY FUND 

Founded in 1908 by gift of $10,000 from William P. Henszey, donated in con- 
nection with the raising of the President Sharpless Fund, but kept as a separate 
fund. Increased in 1909 by legacy of $25,000 from William P. Henszey. Present 
book value, $35,418.53. The income is to be used, as in the President Sharpless 
Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President of the 
College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may de- 
cide. The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College 
Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized 
in said fund. 

JACOB P. JONES BENEFIT FUND 

Founded in 1909 and increased in 1910 by proceeds of land sold for account of 
Jacob P. Jones legacy. Present book value, $65,630.50. The income is to be used, 
as in the President Sharpless Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford 
College as the President of the College and his successors, with the approval of 
the Board of Managers, may decide. The income from this fund is annually trans- 
ferred to the Haverford College Pensioh Fund for old style pensions, or, if not 
needed for pensions, is capitalized in said fund. 

PLINY EARLE CHASE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1909 by transfer to the College of a fund raised in 1887 in memory 
of Professor Pliny E^rle Chase, and amounting to par value of $4,173.04. Present 
book value, $3,152.93. The income of this fund is used, as in the President Sharp- 
less Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President 
of the College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, 
may decide. This income is transferred annually to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund, for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in 
said fund. 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE PENSION FUND 

Founded in 1920 and added to since, being accumulations of income from the 
President Sharpless Fund, the William P. Henszey Fund, the Jacob P. Jones 
Benefit Fund and the Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund, not needed for pensions. 
Present book value, $107,955.98. The income from this fund, together with the 
income from the four above-mentioned funds, is used for old style pensions. In- 
come not needed for pensions was capitalized until 1932; then any unused income 
was used toward the College's share in cost of new contributory pensions with the 
Teachers' Annuity and Insurance Association. Now the old style pensions call 
for more than the income of all these Pension Funds. When the proper time comes 
in an actuarial sense, the principal of this fund can be used as well as the income for 
the old style pensions until they cease. 

FUNDS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 

THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Founded in 1904 by gift of $5,000 from the late Samuel R. Shipley as a memorial 
to his father, Thomas Shipley. Present book value, $5,056.68. The income only 
to be used for lectures on English Literature at the College. In case of actual need, 
at the discretion of the President of the College, the income can be used for general 
expenditures. 

ELLISTON P. MORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1906 by gift of $1,000 from Elliston P. Morris, '48. Present book 
value, $1,085.68. The income is to be used as a prize for essays to be written by 
students on the subject of Arbitration and Peace. "The Elliston P. Morris Prize" 
of $40 is given in each year, the competition being open to all undergraduates 
and to graduates of not more than three years' standing. 

In 1929, it was determined, with the consent of the family of Elliston P. Morris, 
that when the prize is not awarded the income may be used for the purchase of 
library bf""ks on arbitration and peace. 

65 



JOHN B. GARRETT READING PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1908 by a gift of $2,000 par value of bonds by the late John B. 
Garrett, '54. It was the purpose of the donor to ensure the permanence of a prize 
or prizes for Systematic Reading, which he had given for a number of years. The 
prizes were not awarded from 1922 to 1939 on account of default of the bonds. 
Reorganization has resulted in 1939 in sufficient recovery of value to provide 
again for this prize. Present book value $2,189.40. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1909 by gift of $12,000 par value of bonds, book value $11,800, 
from an anonymous donor. Present book value, $8,890.67. The income only of 
this fund to be used "to furnish opportunity for study of social and economic and 
religious conditions and duties connected therewith, especially from a Chris- 
tian point of view." The income is used toward the expenses of Summer Schools for 
Religious Study, which have been held at Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges 
from time to time, and also for religious education under Friends' care. 

On Fifth Month 16, 1930, the Managers adopted the following amendment, 
made at the suggestion of the donor, now revealed to be John Thompson Emlen, 
1900: "If, however, it shall in the course of time be deemed advisable by the Presi- 
dent and the Managers that the income of this fund can be used more profitably 
by the College for other purposes than those herewith stated, it is my desire that 
they shall act in accordance with their judgment." 



SCHOLARSHIP IMPROVEMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1913 by gift of $2,000 par value of bonds, book value, $1,200, from 
John L. Scull, '05. Present book value, $2,213.14. The income only to be used to 
establish two prizes of $50 and $45 annually to the two students in the graduating 
class showing the most marked and steady improvement in scholarship during 
their college course. 



ELIZABETH P. SMITH FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $1,000 from Elizabeth P. Smith. Present book 
value, $1,680.48. The income only to be used as a prize for the best essays on 
Peace written by students of the College. 



S. P. LIPPINCOTT HISTORY PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1917 by gift of $2,500 par value of bonds, book value, $2,546.88, 
from beneficiary of the estate of S. P. Lippincott, '86. Present book value, 
$2,454.02. The income only to be used as an annual history prize, which is 
designated "The S. P. Lippincott History Prize." The award is to be made 
on the basis of a competitive essay. In any year when no award is made, the 
income is to be used for the purchase of library books in the field of the 
unawarded prize. 

FRANCIS STOKES FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $5,000 in securities, book value, $5,000, from 
Francis J. Stokes, '94, in memory of his father, Francis Stokes, of the Class of 
1852, and a Manager of Haverford from 1885 until his death in 1916. Present 
book value, $4,933.63. The income is to be used for extending the planting of 
trees and shrubs on the College grounds. The wish is expressed, but not as a bind- 
ing condition of the gift, that the Campus Club should have the direction of the 
expenditure of this income. 



66 



GEORGE PEIRCE PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $600, and increased in 1920 by further gift of $400, 
from Harold and Charlotte C Peirce in memory of their deceased son, George 
Peirce, '03. Present book value $2,314.33. The income only is to be used for a 
prize, to be called the George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics, to the 
student who, in the opinion of the Faculty, has shown marked proficiency in 
either or in both of these studies and who wishes to follow a profession which 
calls for such preparation. Unused income is capitalized, as requested by the 
founders of the fund. 

LYMAN BEECHER HALL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1924 by donation of securities of par value, $2,000, book value, 
$1,820, from the Class of 1898 in commemoration of their 25th anniversary of 
graduation to establish an annual prize of $100 in Chemistry in honor of Doctor 
Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 
1917. Present book value, $2,076.43. 

NEWTON PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1925 by donation of five shares of General Electric Co. stock by A. 
Edward Newton, par value, $500, and book value, $1,348.25. Present book value, 
$1,346.7Q. The income only is to be used for "The Newton Prize in English Litera- 
ture to the undergraduate who shall submit the best essay on some subject con- 
nected with English literature." In 1930, the award was changed to be on the basis 
of Final Honors, and in any year when no award is made the income is to be used 
for the purchase of library books in the field of the unawarded prize. 

EDWARD B. CONKLIN ATHELTIC FUND 

Founded in 1925 and added to in 1926, 1927 and 1929 by Frank H. Conklin, 
'95, in memory of his brother, Edward B. Conklin, '99. Present book value, 
$2,312.51. The income is to be used without restriction in any branch of athletics 

ARBORETUM FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $5,000 from proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and southeast corner of the College farm. Until 
otherwise ordered by the Managers, the fund is to be invested and the income only 
is to be used under the direction of the Campus Club for trees and shrubs upon 
the College grounds, or for their care, or for other similar purposes. Present book 
value, $4,420.49. 

WILLIAM ELLIS SCULL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1929 by William Ellis Scull, '83, by a gift of $2,000. The income is 
to be used annually, so long as the Managers may judge expedient, as a prize to 
be awarded at Commencement by the Faculty to that upper classman who in 
their judgment shall have shown the greatest improvement in voice and the articu- 
lation of the English Language. The prize is to be known as "The William Ellis 
Scull Prize," Present book value, $1,927.09. 

C. WHARTON STORK ART FUND 

In First Month, 1930, C. Wharton Stork, of Class of 1902, donated to the 
Corporation securities of a then value of $69,000 on account of a contemplated 
gift for the purpose of erecting, equipping, and furnishing an Art Museum at the 
College. Purchases were made by C. Wharton Stork of paintings, which are hung 
in the Library. This fund is to be liquidated and is not included in the total 
of the funds. 



67 



PAUL D. I. MAIER FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 7, 1936, by bequest of $1,000 from Paul D. I. Maier, 
'96, of Byrn Mawr, Pa. The bequest provides for the continuance of the Class 
of 1896 Prizes of $10 each in Latin and Mathematics, and any balance of income 
is to be used for general purposes. Present book value, $963.54. 

STRAWBRIDGE OBSERVATORY MAINTENANCE FUND 

Founded Second Month 13, 1937, from donations of $5,627.37 from members of 
the Strawbridge family, being the amount in excess of the actual cost of the re- 
building and reequipment of the William J. Strawbridge, '94, Memorial Astronom- 
ical Observatory. The income is used for the maintenance and equipment of 
the observatory. The principal can be used for additional equipment, if so deter- 
mined by the Board of Managers. In 1938 and 1939 an astrographic camera was 
so purchased at a cost of $1,787.83. Present book value $3,699.55. 

JACOB AND EUGENIE BUCKY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 

Founded Sixth Month 4, 1942 by gift of $2,000.00 from Colonial Trust Com- 
pany of New York and Solomon L. Fridenberg of Philadelphia, co-trustees under 
the will of Eugenie Bucky, deceased (late of New York), the income only to be 
used. At the same time accumulated income of $2,000.00 was also donated as 
Bucky Foundation Gift, this amount to be available for use for the same pur- 
poses as the income of the Foundation. Extracts from Mrs. Bucky's will and 
codicils in reference to the purposes of the Bucky Foundation are here made 
as follows: 

"The purpose or object of such a Foundation or Fund is and shall be for the 
encouragement of them who seek new truths, and who endeavor to free and clear 
from mystery and confusion our knowledge concerning God'; and thereby to 
enforce more effectively the common laws of mutual love and obligation, peace 
and goodwill, between and among our several creeds, races, nations, and markets.^ 

"My aim, intention, purpose and object is to help in promoting piety among 
men, enlightening their ignorance and bettering their condition, by making more 
and more extensive and by spreading among the public at large not only the 
preaching but also the practicing of the words of the . . . American motto 'In 
God We Trust' and of the . . . Preamble to the Constitution for the United States 
of America. I believe and therefore I aim, intend and purpose that the uplifting 
of men, women and children to the standard of life taught in the Scriptures and 
the Constitution for the United States of America is indeed the work of Charity, 
dispels ignorance, inculcates generous and patriotic sentiments, and fits the 
public groups and the individual men or women for their good usefulness in the 
American Commonwealth." 

1. Associated with the American motto "In God We Trust." 

2. Associated with the Preamble of the Constitution for the United States of 
America — ^"to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic 
tranquility, provide the common defense, promote the public welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity." Present book value, 
$2,201.86. 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded May 20, 1943 from gifts totaling $900.00 of members of the Mathe- 
matics faculty and others. A further gift of $125 w as made in 1943-44. The unused 
income is added to principal. This capitalized the annual prizes that had been 
given by the Mathematics professors for many years. 

The Mathematics Department Prizes for freshmen, $25.00, arc awarded annu- 
ally, in competition, by examination. Present book value, $1,09329. 



68 



WILLIAM T. ELKINTON FUND 
(This fund is new this year) 

Founded Ninth Month 6, 1944, by bequest from William T. Elkinton, of Phila- 
delphia, arising from a Trust set up by him during his lifetime. The principal 
was $2,491.50 and income received, $11.11, a total of $2,502.61. After the death of 
a life beneficiary, the Trust provided : "to pay over, assign and transfer one of 
said equal parts unto the Corporation of Haverford College (a corporation of 
the State of Pennsylvania) ; the principal fund thus passing to said Corporation 
to constitute a part of such endowment as may be established at Haverford Col- 
lege as a fitting memorial of Friends' relief work abroad, which memorial 
'should foster the peaceful relations of the United States with foreign countries 
by acquainting our youth with the principles of European governments and with 
international problems' ; provided however, that if no such Endowment should 
be established at Haverford College prior to the expiration of one year after the 
principal of the Fund hereby conveyed becomes distributable under the provisions 
of this deed, the said one-third part of the fund hereby conveyed shall be devoted 
by the Corporation of Haverford College for such other purpose as the Trustees 
acting hereunder, their survivor or successor, shall designate, preferably for the 
furtherance of education in some form at Haverford College or for providing 
assistance in the form of scholarships to promote education." 

In accordance with a suggestion from President Morley, concurred in by 
Thomas W. Elkinton representing the Trustees, the Managers voted on Ninth 
Month 22, 1944, that "the income until otherwise directed, is to be used for 
traveling and other expenses in the attendance at intercollegiate conferences for 
discussion of international problems by representatives of the International 
Relations Club at Haverford." The Trustee further stated "as long as the 
activities of the Club are closely related to 'acquainting our youth with the prin- 
ciples of European governments and with international problems,' the use of the 
income by the Qub would be satisfactory." 

TILNEY MEMORIAL FUND 
(This fund is new this year) 

Founded in First Month, 1945, by gifts totalling $2,000 by I. Sheldon Tilney, 
1903, in memory of his parents, John S. and Georgiana E. Tilney. The income 
is to be used "to try to influence the student body towards a more religious view- 
point of life." Permission was also granted by the donor that "the income may 
be used also in connection with a scholarship for students in the field of Philos- 
ophy or Biblical Literature." 

In 1945-1946 the fund was increased to $5,000, by gifts of $1,000 from Georgi- 
ana S. Kirkbride and $2,000 from Robert W. Tilney, sister and brother of 
I. Sheldon Tilney. 



CLASS OF 1902 LATIN PRIZE FUND 

(This fund is new this year) 

Founded Second Month 2, 1945, by gift from Qass of 1902 of $142.90, being 
proceeds of sale of security formerly purchased and held by the Qass to per- 
petuate a Latin Prize of $10 annually at Haverford. The Qass had donated 
the income for this prize since 1913. An unused balance of $39.00 of such dona- 
tions was transferred to the income account of this fund. 



69 



STATED MEETINGS OF THE CORPOKATIOX 
AND THE MANAGERS 

The Annual Meeting of "The Corporation of Haverfard College" 
is held on the second Third-day in the Tenth Month, at 3 o'clock p.m. 



The Stated Meetings of the Managers for 1944-45 will be held 
on the second Sixth-day of First and Third Months, and on the third 
Sixth-day of Fifth, Ninth and Eleventh months. 



LEGACIES 

The friends of the College, including former students, and all who 
are interested in the promotion of sound learning, are invited to 
consider the College in the disposition of their estates by will. 



FORM OF BEQUEST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 

/ give and bequeath, jree and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto the Corporation of Haverfard College, the sum of 

Dollars. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

/ give and devise, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto The Corporation of Haverford College, its Suc- 
cessors and Assigns, in fee, the follozving described real estate: (Here 
describe the real estate.) 



70 



p 



" 



u 



11[S[ 




1945-1946 

CATALOG ISSUE 



VOLUME XLIY 



;ember 

1945 



NUMBER THREE 



Issued October, November, December, and February 
BY HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Haverford, Pa. 

Entered as Second Class matter, November 2, 1944, at the Post Office 
at Haverford, Pa., under the act of August 24, 1912. 



>->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->"♦-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-< 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



Bulletin 



^»->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->->">- 




Sil ■<-<-<-<-<^-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<'<-<-<-< 



1945-1946 



HAVERFORD, PENNSY LV A N I A 



>->->->->->->->->->->->->->->-)^>->->->->->">->->->->->-:»-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-^-<-<-< 



CONTENTS 

College Calendar, 1945-46 and 1946-47 4-7 

Haverford College — History and Description 8-11 

Corporation 12 

Board of Managers 1 3-14 

Faculty 15-19 

Officers of Administration 20 

Standing Committees of the Faculty and Administration. . . 21 
Regulations 

Admission 22-24 

College Entrance Board 23-24 

Veterans 24 

Advanced Standing 24 

Curriculum 25-34 

Acceleration 25 

Required Courses 25-26 

Limited Electives 26 

Major Concentration 27-28 

Free Electives 28 

Freshman Program 29 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Programs 29 

Conflicting Courses 29 

Additional Courses 29-30 

Special Cases 30 

Intercollegiate Courtesy 30 

Preparation for Professions 30-34 

Grading of Students 34 

Delinquent Students 34-35 

Degrees 36-37 

Honors 38-39 

Financial Arrangements 40-42 

Rooms, Board, and Tuition 40^1 

Monthly Payments 41 

Fees 41-42 

Loan Fund 42 

Placement Bureau 42 

2 



Student Activities 43-45 

Student Government 43-44 

Societies and Organizations 44-45 

Student Publications 45 

Courses of Instruction 46-76 

General Information 

Library 77-78 

Art Collection 78 

Lectures 78-79 

Bucky Foundation 79 

Infirmary 79 

Health Program 79-80 

Campus Club 80 

Official Publications 80 

Scholarships and Fellowships 80-84 

Prizes 84-89 

Degrees, Prizes, and Honors Granted in 1944-45 90-93 

Directory of Students, Faculty, and Officers 94-104 

Alumni Associations 105-106 

Index 107 



1945 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


September 














1 


November 










1 


3 


3 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




11 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




18 


19 


SO 


31 


22 


33 


34 




23 


24 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 




25 


36 


37 


38 


39 


30 






30 






























October 




1 


3 


3 


4 


5 


6 


December 














1 




7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


13 


13 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


30 




9 


lO 


11 


13 


13 


14 


15 




21 


33 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 




16 


17 


18 


19 


30 


21 


22 




28 


39 


30 


31 










23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


1946 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


January 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


April 




1 


3 


3 


4 


5 


6 




6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


13 




7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


13 


13 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


30 




20 


31 


33 


33 


34 


35 


36 




21 


33 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 




27 


38 


39 


30 


31 








28 


39 


30 










February 












1 


^. 










1 


^ 


3 


4 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 




10 


11 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


33 


33 




19 


30 


31 


33 


33 


34 


35 




24 


35 


36 


37 


38 








26 


37 


38 


39 


30 


31 




March 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 
8 


3 

9 


June 














1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




10 


11 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


33 


33 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




31 
















30 



























College Days in heavy'faced type. 



CALENDAR 

1945-1946 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Sept. 21 

Registration of all new students Sept. 24 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 9 a.m Sept. 25 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation of Haverford College at 

the College, 3 p.m Oct. 16 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Nov. 16 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 22 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Dec. 10 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive) Dec. 21, 1945-Jan. 6, 1946 

First-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduating 

Seniors Jan. 17 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Jan. 18 

First-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors in 

Major Subjects) Jan. 19 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations Jan. 21-24 

Midyear Examinations Jan. 23-Feb. 1 

Second Semester begins with Registration of all new stu- 
dents, 9 A.M.; approved Second-Semester Programs of 

returning students must be filed by 5 p.m Feb. 4 

Second-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m.; Assembly, for all stu- 
dents, 1 1 a.m Feb. 5 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Mar. 15 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 24-31 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Apr. 30 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts Apr. 30 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers May 17 

Second-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for gradu- 
ating Seniors May 23 

Second-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors 

in Major Subjects) May 25 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations May 27-30 

Final Examinations May 29-June 7 

Commencement Day June 8 

5 



1946 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


September 


1 


? 


3 


4 


S 


f> 


7 


November 












1 


2 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




22 


23 
80 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




17 
24 


18 
25 


19 
26 


20 
27 


21 

28 


22 
29 


23 
30 


October 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


December 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


12 




8 


9 


ID 


11 


12 


13 


14 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




27 


28 


29 


30 


31 








29 


30 


31 










1947 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


January 








1 


? 


^ 


4 








1 


7 


^ 


4 


5 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 




6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


12 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


February 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


1 


May 


27 


28 


29 


30 








1 


o 


3 
lO 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




9 


lO 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


March 














1 


June 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


T 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




9 


lO 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 
30 


24 

31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




29 


30 

































College Days in heavy-faced type. 



CALENDAR 

1946-1947 

Registration of all new students Sept. 16-17 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 9 a.m.; registra- 
tion of returning students Sept. 18 

First-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m Sept. 19 

Thanksgiving Recess (dates inclusive) Nov. 21-24 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Dec. 9 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive) Dec. 22, 1946-Jan. 5, 1947 

First-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduating 

Seniors Jan. 1 1 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations Jan. 15-18 

First-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors in 

Major Subjects) Jan, 16 

Midyear Examinations Jan. 20-31 

Commencement Day Feb. 1 

Second Semester begins with Registration of all new stu- 
dents, 9 A.M.; approved Second-Semester Programs of 

returning students must be filed by 5 p.m Feb. 3 

Second-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m.; Assembly, for all stu- 
dents, 1 1 A.M Feb. 4 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 30-Apr. 6 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Apr. 29 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts Apr. 29 

Second-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduat- 
ing Seniors May 17 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations May 21-24 

Second-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors 

in Major Subjects) May 22 

Final Examinations May 26-June 6 

Commencement Day June 7 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE was foundcd in 1833. It owes its origin 
to the vision and energy of a few members of the Society of 
Friends who, in the spring of 1830, conceived the idea of 
founding an institution for education in the higher branches of learn- 
ing. The object, in the words of the founders, was "to combine 
sound and liberal instruction in literature and science with a 
religious care over the morals and manners, thus affording to the 
youth of our Society an opportunity of acquiring an education equal 
in all respects to that which can be obtained at colleges." 

The founders were incorporated in 1833, under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, into the Haverford School Asso- 
ciation, a body now known as the Corporation of Haverford College. 
This corporation elects a Board of Managers for the control of its 
affairs and for the administration of its funds. For the founding 
of the School sixty thousand dollars was raised. Since tliat time, 
by a number of generous bequests and donations, the amount of 
invested funds yielding income has been increased to over four 
million dollars. 

Haverford Station is on the main line of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, between Bryn Mawr and Ardmore, and is only twenty minutes 
from downtown Philadelphia by excellent suburban service. The 
College campus, adjoining the famous Lancaster Pike (U. S. 30) , is 
two hours' train journey from New York or Baltimore, and under 
three hours from Washington. Valley Forge is one of the many 
national shrines in the immediate vicinity. The cities of Trenton, 
Bethlehem, Allentown, Reading, Lancaster, Chester, and Wilmington 
all lie within a radius of fifty miles. Whether for historic association, 
cultural advantage, or physical accessibility, Haverford College is 
admirably situated. 

The original tract of 198 acres has since been increased to 216 
acres. While a portion is retained as farm and woodland, a lawn of 
sixty acres was long ago graded and tastefully planted with trees and 
shrubs by a landscape gardener so that the natural beauty of the 
location has increased with passing years. The grounds include seven 

8 



History and Description 9 

fields for football, baseball, cricket, and soccer; a running-track, 
numerous tennis courts, and a pond for skating. 

Parallel with its material growth there have been changes in the 
inner life of the College which have affected the methods of admin- 
istration rather than the essential principles on which the institu- 
tion was founded. It has gradually increased in number of students, 
but with an enrollment limited to 400 still enjoys all the advantages 
of a small college. From the first it gave instruction of collegiate 
scope and grade. Accordingly, in 1856, the name was changed from 
school to college and the right to confer degrees was granted by the 
Legislature. In 1861 the preparatory department was abolished. 

The large endowment enables the College to maintain a faculty 
of unusual size in proportion to the number of students, and to 
expend for the instruction, board, and lodging of each student 
much more than he pays. The advantages of a central location are 
utilized by bringing to college assemblies, on frequent occasions, 
men and women who have established leadership in government, 
business, and the professions. Particularly in the Social Sciences, 
where the seminar method is emphasized, theoretical instruction is 
frequently checked against the practical experience of visitors 
prominent in official, industrial, and professional life. 

Haverford students enjoy unusual liberty, safeguarded by their 
wholesome physical life, by the traditions of the College, and by 
the intimate association with their professors and fellow students. 
All examinations and tests are conducted under an Honor System 
administered by the Students' Association. Under the Honor Sys- 
tem no person, either student or faculty member, acts as official 
proctor during examinations. Responsible student self-government 
is further emphasized in every aspect of campus life. 

The religious tradition bequeathed by the Quaker founders has 
been carefully cherished, and high ideals of life and conduct are 
maintained. Three times a month the College attends Friends 
Meeting in a body. The aims of Haverford have been gradually 
developing and its function is becoming more and more clear — 
"to encourage the growth, among a limited number of young men, 
of vigorous bodies, scholarly minds, strong characters, and a real 
religious experience." 

A degree from Haverford College is, in itself, a certificate that the 
recipient is intellectually, morally, physically, and socially equipped 



10 Haverford College 

to play his part and in time to assume a post of leadership in the 
occupation and community of his choosing. A good proportion of 
Haverford graduates, however, customarily desire to supplement 
this equipment with distinctly professional education. For students 
who plan to take graduate training in medicine, law, engineering, 
and other highly specialized subjects, the College offers combina- 
tions of courses which prepare its students for admission to the 
best professional schools with full standing, and in many cases with 
advanced credit. 

Sample outlines of study at Haverford, preparatory to post- 
graduate specialization in all the major professions, have been 
prepared. Whether or not he intends to proceed to graduate work, 
the student will in all cases plan his course, and select his Major 
subject, in consultation with faculty advisers. 

The first College building was Founders Hall, erected in 1833; 
with additional wings, it is still in active use. The original astro- 
nomical observatory was built in 1852 and in 1933 was replaced by 
the present newly-equipped structure. The new library, constructed 
in 1940-41, has special facilities for research and contains approxi- 
mately 167,000 volumes. 

There are four separate dormitories, as well as modern class- 
rooms, well-equipped laboratories for chemistry, physics, biology, 
and engineering. The gymnasium was built in 1900; Roberts Hall, 
containing the College offices and a large auditorium, in 1903; the 
Haverford Union, used for many college activities, dates from 1910; 
the Infirmary, from 1912. In the summer of 1941 the College 
kitchens were completely modernized, and in the same year a suit- 
able campus dwelling was converted into a Language House with 
resident director. During the summer of 1942 another of the 
campus dwellings was remodeled into a Government House, which 
has rooms for fifteen students and an apartment for its director. 
Science House, opened in 1943, completes the trio of specialized 
student residences, the occupants of which have all the advantages 
of fraternity life without its social discrimination. 

In February, 1943, the College began the academic training of a 
Pre-Meteorology Unit for the Army Air Forces Technical Training 
Command. These student soldiers remained in residence for a year. 
In September, 1943, an Army Specialized Training Unit was added, 
composed for the most part of Area and Language Study trainees. 
On the termination of this program Haverford received a small 
Army Pre-Medical Unit, which graduated on November 30, 1944. 



History and Description 11 

A special Relief and Reconstruction Unit, at graduate level, was 
established during the summer of 1943. 

Since the end of the war the College has rapidly been returning 
to normal size and activity. By the fall of 1946 it is expected that 
reconversion will be complete. 



oSG^ 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Officers 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes, President Moorestown, N. J. 

Archibald Macintosh, Acting President of the College Haverford, Pa. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 3 

John F. Gummere, Secretary VV. School Lane and Fox St., Phila. 44 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 

Term Expires 1946 

Harris G. Haviland 17th and Parkway, Phila. 3 

Archibald Macintosh 3 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

Term Expires 1947 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Phila. 44 

Irvin C. Poley 6012 Chew St., Phila. 38 

Arthur J. Phillips 274 S. Felton St., Phila. 39 

Term, Expires 1948 

Henry C. Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Phila. 28 

WiLMOT R. Jones Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

Richard M. Sutton 785 College Ave., Haverford, Pa. 



12 



Board of Managers 

Ex-officio as Officers of Corporation 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes, President Moorestown, N. J. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 3 

John F. Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox St., Phila. 44 

Term Expires 1946 

Frederic H. Strawbridce 801 Market St., Phila. 7 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

L. Hollingsworth Wood 103 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Phila. 44 

William W. Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 314 Overhill Rd., Baltimore 10, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 325 Chestnut St., Phila. 6 

Harold Evans 1000 Provident Trust Bldg., Phila. 3 

W. Nelson West, 111* 1411 Walnut St., Phila. 2 

Term Expires 1947 

J. Stogdell Stokes Summerdale, Phila. 24 

M. Albert Linton 4601 Market St., Phila. 39 

Francis R. Taylor 910 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 S. 3rd St., Phila. 6 

Morris E. Leeds 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 44 

Henry C. Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Phila. 28 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 7 

J. Colvin Wright* 116 E. Penn St., Bedford, Pa. 

Term Expires 1948 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 6 

William A. Battey Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 7 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Tabor Rd. and E. Adams Ave., Phila. 20 

Alfred Busselle 220 E. 36th St., New York, N. Y. 

WiLMOT R. Jones Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Paul V. R. Miller* Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

Charles S. Ristine* Fidelity-Phila. Trust Bldg., Phila. 9 

Faculty Representatives on Board of Managers 

Term Expires 1946 Term Expires 1947 

Frank D. Watson Richard M. Sutton 

Alternates, 1945^6: Howard M. Teaf and Ralph M. Sargent 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes W. Nelson West, III 



* Alumni Representative Manager. 



13 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 

OF THE Corporation of Haverford College 

The Chairman of the Board is an ex-officio 

member of all committees. 

Executive Committee 
J. Stogdell Stokes, Chairman Thomas W. Elkinton 

Jonathan M. Steere Paul V. R. Miller 

J. Henry Scattercood W. Nelson West, III 

Frederic C. Sharpless Edward W. Evans 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr. Morris E. Leeds 

Committee on Finance and Investments 
Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman Alexander C. Wood, Jr. 

J. Henry Scattercood M. Albert Linton 

WiLUAM B. Bell 

Committee on College Property and Farm 
Henry C. Evans, Chairman Wiluam A. Battey 

Frederic H. Strawbridge Thomas W. Elkinton 

Edward W. Woolman John A. Silver 

Alfred Busselle William M. Maier 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 
William W. Comfort, Chairman Francis R. Taylor 

Stanley R. Yarnall Henry M. Thomas 

M. Albert Linton 

Library Committee 
William W. Comfort Wilmot R. Jones 

Harold Evans L. Holungsworth Wood 

Counsel 

MacCoy, Brittain, Evans, and Lewis 
1632 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 3 



14 



FACULTY 

Archibald Macintosh Acting President 

A.B., Haverford College 
M.A., Columbia University 



William Wistar Comfort President, Emeritus 

A.B. and LL.D., Haverford College 

A.B., A. M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Litt.D., University of Pennsylvania 

LL.D., University of Maryland and Lake Forest College 

Henry Sherring Pratt David Scull Professor of Biology, Emeritus 

A.B., University of Michigan 

A.M. and Ph.D., University of Leipzig 

RuFUS Matthew Jones T. Wistar Brown Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus 

A.B., A. M., and LL.D., Haverford College 

A.M. and D.D., Harvard University 

Litt.D., Penn College 

LL.D., Swarthmore College, Earlham College, and Williams College 

D.Theol., University of Marburg 

D.D., Yale University 

D.Lit.Hum., Colgate University 

S.T.D., Colby College and Columbia University 

H.Litt.D., Jewish Institute of Religion 

Legh Wilber Reid Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

S.B., Virginia Military Institute 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University 
S.M., Princeton University 
Ph.D., University of Gottingen 

Albert Harris Wilson Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

S.B. and S.M., Vanderbilt University 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Henry Volkmar Gummere Lecturer in Astronomy, Emeritus 

S.B., A.M., and Sc.D., Haverford College 
A.M., Harvard University 

Frederic Palmer, Jr Professor of Physics, Emeritus 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Leon Hawley Rittenhouse Professor of Engineering, Emeritus 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology 



(The active members of the Faculty are arranged in the order of their 

appointment to their present rank. Two or more appointed in 

the same year are listed in alphabetical order.) 

William Edward Lunt Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professor of 

English Constitutional History (1917) 
A.B. and L.H.D., Bowdoin College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Frank Dekker Watson Professor of Sociology and Social Work (1921) 

S.B. in Economics and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Dean Putnam Lockwood Professor of Latin (1923) 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

15 



16 Haverford College 

William Buell Maldrum John Farnum Professor of Chemistry (1927) 

B.A. and M.Sc, McGill University 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Levi Arnold Post Professor of Greek (1933) 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College 

A.M., Harvard University 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

Emmett Reid Dunn David Scull Professor of Biology (1934) 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Edward Douglas Snyder Professor of English (1935) 

A.B., Yale University 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Frank Whitson Fetter* Professor of Economics (1936) 

A.B., Swarthmore College 
A.M., Harvard University 
A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

John Alexander Kelly Professor of German (1937) 

A.B., Emory and Henry College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Columbia University 

Douglas Van Steere Professor of Philosophy (1941) 

S.B., Michigan State College 

B.A., Oxford University 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Cletus Odia Oakley Professor of Mathematics (1942) 

B.S., University of Texas 
S.M., Brown University 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Richard Manliffe Sutton Professor of Physics (1942) 

S.B., Haverford College 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

Ralph Millard Sargent Professor of English (1943) 

A.B., Carleton College 
Ph.D., Yale University 



Alfred Julius Swavi Associate Professor of Music (1931) 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

John Goodwin H6rndon Associate Professor of Government (1933) 

A.B. and M.A., Washington and Lee University 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

John William Flight** Associate Professor of Biblical Literature (1936) 

B.A., Hope College 

M.A., Yale University 

B.D. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Harry William Pfund Associate Professor of German (1936) 

A.B., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

•Absent on leave, 1945-46. 
** Absent on leave, first semester, 1945-48. 



Faculty 17 

Howard Comfort Associate Professor of Latin and Greek (1938) 

A.B., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

F.A.A.R., American Academy in Rome 

Alexander Jardine Williamson* Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

(1939) 
A.B., Haverford College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Roy Earl Randall** Associate Professor of Physical Education (1941) 

Ph.B., Brown University 

Carl Barnett Allendoerfer Associate Professor of Mathematics (1942) 

S.B., Haverford College 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

Ph.D., Princeton University 

Thomas Edward Drake Associate Professor of American History (1942) 

A.B., Stanford University 
M.A., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Clayton William Holmes Associate Professor of Engineering (1942) 

B.S. and M.E., University of New Hampshire 
A.M., Haverford College 

Richard Max Bernheimer* Associate Professor of Art (1943) 

Ph.D., University of Munich 

Edmund Stinnes Associate Professor of Government (1943) 

Ph.D., Charlottenburg Institute of Technology 

Howard Morris Teaf, Jr Associate Professor of Economics (1943) 

B.S. in Economics, A.M., and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

William Edward Cadbury, Jr Associate Professor of Chemistry (1944) 

S.B. and A.M., Haverford College 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Thomas Oswell Jones* Associate Professor of Chemistry (1944) 

B.E., Oshkosh Teachers College 

Ph.M. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Abraham Pepinsky Associate Professor of Psychology and Music (1945) 

B.A. and M.A., University of Minnesota 
Ph.D., The State University of Iowa 



Howard Knickerbocker Henry Assistant Professor of Botany (1939) 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Theodore Brinton Hetzel* Assistant Professor of Engineering (1940) 

S.B., Haverford College 

B.S. in M.E., University of Pennsylvania 

M.S. and Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College 

Alfred William Haddleton Assistant Professor of Physical Education (1941) 

•Absent on leave, 1945-46. 
** Absent on leave, first semester, 1945-46. 



18 Haverford College 

Louis Craig Green* Assistant Professor of Astronomy (1942) 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Omar Pancoast, Jr.* Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology (1942) 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

C.L.U., American College of Life Underwriters 

Laurence William Wyue Assistant Professor of French (1944) 

B.A. and M.A., University of Indiana 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Manuel Jose Asensio Assistant Professor of Spanish (1945) 

B.A., University of Granada 

Pericial de Aduanas, Academia Official de Aduanas, Madrid 



Howard Haines Brinton Visiting Professor of Philosophy 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Martin Foss Visiting Professor of Philosophy and Government 

LL.D., University of Jena 

John Duncan Spaeth Visiting Professor of English Literature 

A.B. and LL.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Ph.D., University of Leipzig 

Litt.D., University of Pittsburgh and Muhlenberg College 

LL.D., University of Oregon 



Herbert William Taylor Lecturer in Hygiene (1932) 

A.B., Haverford College 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Charles Lyon Chandler Lecturer in Government (1945) 

A.B., Harvard University 

LL.D., University of Bogot&, Colombia; and University of Porto Alegre, Brazil 



Arungton Evans Instructor in Physical Education (1921) 

B.P.E., Normal College A. G. U. 
M.S., Temple University 

WiLUAM Docherty Instructor in Physical Education (1939) 

S.B., Temple University 

John Otto Rantz Instructor in Engineering (1940) 

Graduate of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades 

Thomas Alonzo Benham Instructor in Physics (1942) 

B.S. and M.S., Haverford College 

Elisa Asensio Instructor in Spanish (1943) 

Francis Cope Evans Instructor in Biology (1943) 

S.B., Haverford College 
D.Phil., Oxford University 

Euzabeth Webb Comfort Instructor in French (1944) 

A.B., Vassar College 

•Absent on leave, 1945-46. 



Faculty 19 

John Ashby Lester, Jr Instructor in English (1945) 

B.S., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Theodore Lynn Purnell Instructor in Chemistry (1945) 

B.S., Albright College 

M.S., Pennsylvania State College 



Alan Stewart FitzGerald Research Associate in Physics and Engineering 



Norman Barge Bramall Assistant in Physical Education 

Ray Joseph M ullan Assistant in Physical Education 

B.S. and M.A., Temple University 



c^SGo 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Archibald Macintosh Acting President 

A.B., Haverford College 
M.A., Columbia University 

Gilbert Thomas Hoag Dean 

A.B., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Aldo Caselli Comptroller 

D.S.E. and C, University of Naples 

Dean Putnam Lockwood Librarian 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Herbert Wiluam Taylor Physician in Charge 

A.B., Haverford College 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Louis Craig Green* Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Thomas Edward Drake Curator of the Quaker Collection 

A.B., Stanford University 
M.A., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Bennett Smedley Cooper Alumni Secretary and Assistant to the President 

B.S., Haverford College 

Mrs. Ethel Elizabeth Beatty Dietician 

Amy Lydia Post Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Earlham College 

Mabel Sylvia Beard Resident Nurse 

R.N., Lankenau Hospital 

Alice Louella Mattson Secretary to the President 

Gertrude Mann Wonson Admissions Office 

B.S., Simmons College 

•Absent on leave, 1945-46. 



20 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
AND ADMINISTRATION 



The President is an ex-officio member of all committees. The President, the 
three elected divisional representatives of the Faculty, the Director of the Recon- 
struction and Relief Unit, and Mr. Cooper compose the Academic Council. Under 
the chairmanship of the President this body meets occasionally to consider stu- 
dent petitions and matters of college policy. The elected members for 1945^6 
are Messrs. Drake (Social Science) , Holmes (Natural Sciences) , and Kelly 
(Humanities) . 

Academic Standing 

Mr. Oakley, Chairman 

Messrs. Benham, Cadbury, Hoag, Holmes, Post 

Admissions 

Mr. Macintosh, Chairman 

Messrs. Allendoerfer, Comfort, Holmes, Kelly 

Curriculum and Honors 

Mr. Pfund, Chairman 

Messrs. Dunn, Hoag, Sutton, Teaf, Watson ' 

Fellowships and Prizes 

Mr. Comfort, Chairman 

Messrs. Drake, Flight,** Pepinsky, Stinnes* 

Graduate Students 

Mr. Steere, Chairman 

Messrs. Herndon, Lunt, Oakley, Wyue 

Library 

Mr. Sargent, Chairman 

Messrs. Drake, Foss, Henry, Lockwood, Post 

Pre-Medical Education 

Mr. Meldrum, Chairman 

Messrs. Dunn, Henry, Pepinsky, and Dr. Taylor 

Publications 
Mr. Lockwood, Chairman 
Messrs. Caselli, Herndon, Hoag 

Student Affairs 

Mr. F. Evans, Chairman 

Messrs. Asensio, Benham, Haddleton, Hoag, Kelly, Wylie 

•First semester only. 
"Second semester only. 



21 



REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

The policy of Haverford College is to admit to the Freshman class 
those applicants who, in the opinion of the Committee on Admis- 
sions, are best qualified to profit by the opportunities which the 
College offers and at the same time to contribute to undergradu- 
ate life. Due regard is given not only to scholarly attainment, as 
shown by examination and by school record, but also to character, 
personality, and interest and ability in important extra-curricular 
activities. 

Whenever practicable, the College will arrange for the candidate 
to have a personal interview with the Director of Admissions or 
another administrative officer. Every applicant should realize that, 
in view of the limited enrollment, he is entering a competition for 
admission to a carefully selected and comparatively small student 
organization. On the basis of all information available — College 
Board reports, school record, class standing, evidence touching on 
character and personality — the application will be accepted or re- 
jected, and the decision of the Committee on Admissions is final. 
Preference will be given to those with superior records and creden- 
tials rather than to those with mere priority of application. 

Students who are accepted will be admitted without conditions. 
Those who, on entrance, show marked proficiency in certain sub- 
jects will be permitted to take courses usually not open to Freshmen; 
in such cases, however, the number of courses required for a degree 
will not be diminished. 

Each applicant for admission must take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test given by the College Entrance Examination Board, and usually 
some Achievement Tests given by the same Board. Applications 
involving divergence from the normal procedure must be discussed 
in detail with the Director of Admissions. In addition, the applicant 
must obtain blank forms from the College, on which he must sub- 
mit his school record and a certificate of character signed by his 
school principal. The school certificate must show satisfactory 
attainment in 15 units* of work. 

The preparatory course must include four years of English, at 
least a year and a half of Algebra and one year of Geometry, and 

*A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, constituting approxi- 
mately a quarter of a full year's work. A four years' secondary school curriculum should be 
regarded as representing not more than 16 units of work. 

22 



Admission 23 

three years of a foreign language. Cases involving divergence from 
the requirement should be discussed with the Director of Admis- 
sions. The remaining units will be drawn from laboratory science, 
social science, history, and additional mathematics and language. 

A candidate may offer an elective in a subject not usually listed, 
provided he shows proficiency which indicates an amount of study 
and intellectual effort commensurate with that required in other 
subjects. The subject chosen must have the approval of the Admis- 
sions Committee. 

Information Concerning College Entrance Board Tests 

In addition to the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance 
Board, which is required of all candidates for admission, each can- 
didate shall take, after consultation with the Admissions Office, three 
of the Achievement Tests offered by the Board. 

A single Bulletin of Information containing rules for the filing of 
applications and the payment of fees, lists of examination centers, 
etc., may be obtained without charge from the College Entrance 
Examination Board. The Board does not publish a detailed descrip- 
tion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the Achievement Tests. 
A practice form of the former test will be sent to every candidate 
who registers for it. 

Candidates should make application by mail to the College 
Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. 
Blank forms for this purpose will be sent to any teacher or candidate 
upon request. When ordering the forms, candidates should state 
whether they wish to take the December, April, June, or September 
tests. 

In order to facilitate the arrangements for the conduct of the tests, 
all applications should be filed as early as possible. Each applica- 
tion should be accompanied by the appropriate examination fee, 
which is five dollars for candidates who take only the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and nine dollars for all other candidates. 

The College Entrance Examination Board will administer the 
following four series of tests during the academic year 1945-1946: 
Saturday, December 1, 1945 
Saturday, April 6, 1946 
Saturday, June 1, 1946 
Wednesday, August 28, 1946 



24 



Haverford College 



April 6 

1946 

Series 


June 1 

1946 

Series 


August 28 
1946 
Series 


March 16 


May 11 


August 7 


March 9 


May 4 


July 31 



Applications and fees should reach the office of the Board not 
later than the dates specified in the following schedule: 

December 1 
1945 
Series 
For examination centers located 
East of the Mississippi River 

or on the Mississippi November 10 

West of the Mississippi River 

or in Canada or Mexico. .November 3 
Outside of the United States, 

Canada, and Mexico October 13 February 16 April 13 July 10 

Belated applications will be subject to a penalty fee of three dollars in addition 
to the regular fee. 

When a candidate has failed to obtain the required blank form of 
application, the regular fee will be accepted if it arrives not later 
than the specified date and is accompanied by the candidate's name 
and address, the exact examination center selected, the college to 
which his report is to be sent, and the test or tests he is to take. 

The Board will report the results of the tests to the institution 
indicated on the candidate's application. The colleges will, in turn, 
notify the candidates of the action taken upon their applications 
for admission. Candidates will not receive reports upon their tests 
from the Board. 

Admission of Veterans 

The College welcomes the return of men whose education has been 
interrupted by military, naval, or non-combatant service. Veterans 
will be admitted on the standards of accomplishment set for regular 
Haverford students. Academic credit for courses taken elsewhere 
will be considered on an individual basis. In some cases Haverford 
may require veterans to take the Special Aptitude Test for Veterans 
given by the College Entrance Examination Board (fee six dollars) . 
This Test for Veterans will be held for the first time on December 
1, 1945, in the afternoon. Flexibility will be maintained in regard 
to the time of admission of veterans. Candidates who are interested 
should apply to the Director of Admissions for details. 

Advanced Standing 
Since Haverford offers an integrated education, admission with 
advanced standing is ordinarily granted only in a limited number 
of cases. An undergraduate who comes from an approved college 
must submit an official statement of his honorable dismissal, together 
with a full list of his accepted preparatory subjects, and a list of all 
his college courses, with his record therein. 



CURRICULUM 

General 

Haverford is a liberal arts college. Its curriculum is designed to 
give its students both a knowledge of the content and methods 
of the broad fields of liberal education, and a systematic training 
in testing, co-ordinating, and correlating information in a single 
field of concentration. 

Every student in full standing at Haverford College shall carry 
a normal program of five courses per semester for four years. To 
graduate, a student must have completed successfully the work of 
forty semester-courses, as well as three full years of Physical Edu- 
cation. The courses may be classified as follows: 

Required 2 

Limited Electives (either two or four in Foreign Language — 

see below) 10 or 12 

Major Concentration (average) 12 

Free Electives 14 or 16 

Total 40 

Acceleration 

During the war, Haverford, like other colleges, made arrange- 
ments for students to complete the requirements for a degree in a 
shorter time than is normally required. With the return of peace, 
the Accelerated Program is now being dropped. 

Freshmen who entered in the fall of 1945, or thereafter, will be 
expected to meet the forty-course requirement for the degree. Those 
who have successfully completed one of the Summer Sessions at 
Haverford between 1942 and 1945 will be required to complete 
thirty-eight courses, and those who have completed two or more 
such Summer Sessions must complete thirty-six courses. The num- 
ber of Required Courses and Limited Electives and the average 
number of Major Concentration courses are the same for those 
who have accelerated as for those who have not. 

Hereafter, credit previously approved for Summer School courses 
taken elsewhere will be granted on a straight course basis toward 
the total number of courses required for a degree. 

Required Courses 
Two semester-courses in English are required of all Freshmen. 
Three terms of Physical Education are required of all Freshmen and 
Sophomores, and two terms of all Juniors. The three courses in 

25 



26 Haverford College 

Physical Education are in addition to the forty semester-courses 
required for a degree. 

Limited Electtves 
To secure breadth of distribution, every student is required to 
pass a certain number of courses, as indicated, in each of the follow- 
ing five groups: 

1. Foreign Languages: One full-year course in a language beyond 
the elementary grade. (N.B. A single full-year language course, if 
included among those listed in group 2, will satisfy the require- 
ments in both group 1 and group 2.) 

Furthermore, it is the conviction of Haverford College that the 
study of Greek and Latin offers both general and specific values 
which ought not to be lightly omitted from the education of its stu- 
dents; in view of this conviction the College may advise and, where 
it deems necessary, is prepared to require the study of these subjects. 

2. Literature, History of Art, Music: One full-year course or 
two semester-courses chosen from the following: 

English 8b, Ub, 12a, Ua, Ub, 2\b, 22b, 2Sa, 26b, 27a, 

SOb, S2b, S6b, 42b, 43a 
French 16b, 17a, 18b, 19a, 19b 
German 5a, 6b, 11a, 12b, ISa, Mb, 15a, 17a, 18b 
Greek 2, Sa, 4b, 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 27a 
History of Art (all courses) 
Latin 5a, 6b, 7, 9a, 10b, 11, 17, 36& 
Music 1, 2, 20a 
Spanish 5a, 6b, 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b 

3. Laboratory Science: One full-year course involving labora- 
tory work in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, unless one such course 
was presented for entrance. 

4. Biblical Literature, Philosophy, Sociology: One full-year 
course or two semester-courses chosen from the following: 

Biblical Literature la, 2b, 4b, 6b, 7a, 8b 
Philosophy 3a, 5, 7a, 10b, lib, 17a, 18b 
Sociology la, 2b, 4b, 5a, 6b 

5. Economics, Government, History: One full-year course or 
two semester-courses chosen from the courses oflEered by these 
Department*. 



27 

Major Concentration 

A student may elect to major in any one of the following depart- 
ments: Astronomy, Biblical Literature, Biology, Chemistry, Eco- 
nomics, Engineering, English, French, German, Government, Greek, 
History, History of Art, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, 
Physics, Sociology, Spanish. 

Definite requirements are stated under the name of each depart- 
ment on pages 46-75 and are understood as applying to the classes 
of 1948 and following. During the fourth term of his attendance 
each student should confer with the Major Supervisor of the depart- 
ment in which he wishes to major, and must apply to him for writ- 
ten approval of a program of courses for the last four terms. Such a 
program must provide for the completion, by the end of the Senior 
year, of no fewer than six courses, at least three of which must have 
been in the Major Department and the others in closely related fields. 
Should the student's application be rejected by the department of 
his first choice, he must immediately apply in another. Failure to 
file with the Dean, before the date specified on the College Calendar, 
a copy of his Major Program, signed by his Major Supervisor, will 
entail a fine of $5. Any student who continues delinquent in this 
matter will be debarred from the final examinations in his fourth 
term. Should the student's application be rejected by all the depart- 
ments to which he applies, he will not be promoted. 

A student who applies for permission to become a Major in any 
department may be rejected for scholastic reasons only. The College 
rule on this point is: 

If, at the time specified for application, the average of the grades 
obtained by a student in the "preliminary courses"* and "Major 
Requirements" of any department is 75 or above, the student will 
be accepted by that department. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is below 70, 
the student will be accepted in that department only under excep- 
tional circumstances. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is 70 or above, 
but below 75, the decision will be at the discretion of the Major 
Supervisor. 

The student shall list on his Major registration form only those 
courses which constitute his Major Program. The student chooses 
his own free elective courses for his last four terms, after consulta- 

* "Preliminary courses" mean any courses the student may already have taken in the depart- 
ment for which he is applying. If the applicant has not already taken any courses in that 
department, the department should name courses in other departments which might be regarded 
as "preliminary." 



28 Haverford College 

tion with his Major Supervisor, whose power outside the field of 
Major concentration is, however, merely advisory. 

Each student shall consult with his Major Supervisor within the 
first two weeks of each term during his last four terms for the pur- 
pose of reviewing his program of courses. Due notice of this responsi- 
bility is to be given by the Dean to the students and to the Major 
Supervisors. 

Each Senior must take a special Major examination (written, oral, 
or both) during the week preceding the final examination period. 
The passing grade for this examination is 70, In case of failure, a 
candidate may, with the permission of his Major Department, present 
himself for re-examination at a date (to be determined by the Major 
Supervisor) later than Commencement Day of the current year. 

If the re-examination is taken one year later, during the regular 
period of Major examinations, there is no fee. But if the candidate 
applies for re-examination at an earlier date (involving the prepara- 
tion of a special examination for one individual) and if the request 
is granted, the fee is $25. 

A student who has been formally accepted as a Major by any 
department has the right to remain as a Major in that department as 
long as he is in College. Should he wish to change from one depart- 
ment to another after the beginning of his fifth term, the change 
can be made only by the consent of the two Major Supervisors con- 
cerned and the Dean, 

In order to allow time for preparation for the Major examination, 
any Senior may omit, with the consent of his Major Supervisor, one 
non-Major half-year course in the second half-year. The time thus 
taken for preparation for the Major shall be technically called 
course 206 in the student's department of concentration. Hence 
there will be no diminution in the total requirement of forty 
semester-courses for the degree. 

Examination in the Major subject in courses taken in the Senior 
year may be omitted at the discretion of the Major Supervisor. 

Free Electives 

A number of courses sufficient to bring the total to forty semester- 
courses shall be chosen by the student, with the understanding that 
for the Freshman and Sophomore years the College reserves the 
right, through the Dean, to prevent unreasonable combinations of 
courses, but that in the Junior and Senior years the student will 
choose his free electives after consultation with his Major Supervisor. 



29 
Programs 

Freshman Program 

Although the Dean is instructed to lay out for each Freshman a 

plan of study suited to his special needs, the Faculty requires that 

English be taken throughout the year, and recommends in all usual 

cases that Freshmen take one or two foreign languages and two or 

three courses in History, Mathematics, Science (but not more than 

one in each of these three Departments) . 

The courses open to Freshmen, in addition to the required work 

in English and Physical Education, are: 

Astronomy la Greek 1, 2, 3a, 4ft 

Biblical Literature la, 26 History 1 

Biology 1, 2a History of Art 

Chemistry la, 2a, 26, 36 (see Bryn Mawr Calendar) 

Engineering la, 26, 106 Latin 1, 3, 5a, 66, 7 

English 26 Mathematics 1 

French 1, 2, 3 Music 1 

German 1, 2, 3 Physics 1, 2 

Government 26, 3a Spanish 1, 2, 3 

In special cases, with the consent of the Dean, Freshmen may be 
admitted to certain other courses. 

In cooperation with the Department of English the Dean admin- 
isters a series of standard tests to all entrants within the first few 
days of each term. The results of these tests are used to help Fresh- 
men readjust, if necessary, their selection of courses. These tests 
are also used to determine which Freshmen should be recommended 
to take the voluntary course in Remedial Reading. This course is 
offered each term, for no credit, to students who feel the need of 
establishing reading habits that will improve their comprehension 
and increase their speed when studying reading assignments. 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Programs 
Unless otherwise specified, all courses offered in any term are 
open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

Conflicting Courses 
A student is not allowed to elect conflicting courses, except with 
the permission of the Dean and the two instructors concerned. 

Additional Courses 
In general. Freshmen will be permitted to take only five courses. 
Sophomores and upperclassmen may take a sixth course only if 
they have passed five courses in the preceding semester with an aver- 
age of not less than 80. Exceptions to this rule may be made at the 



30 Haverford College 

discretion of the Dean in the case of Seniors in their last semester 
in college. A fee of $25 per semester is charged for every additional 
course. 

Special Cases 

Whenever a student gives proof of special abilities, the College 
is prepared to lay aside such requirements of the preceding plan 
as stand between him and the development of his gifts. 

Intercollegiate Courtesy 

Because of the cooperative relationship now existing between 
Bryn Mawr College, Haverford College, Swarthmore College, and 
the University of Pennsylvania, full-time students of one of these 
four institutions may, upon presentation of the proper credentials, 
enroll for courses in another institution of the group. This institu- 
tional courtesy does not involve the payment of additional fees 
except in laboratory courses. Visiting students will be charged the 
same laboratory fees or deposits as in their own institution. 

Students desiring to take advantage of this arrangement should 
secure permission from the Dean and from the chairman of the 
Department at the college in which the course is given. It is also 
desirable that the instructor giving the course be consulted in 
advance. 

Graduate students will obtain similar permission from the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Students. Ordinarily, the holder of a graduate 
fellowship will not be permitted to take more than one course in 
another institution for credit on his Haverford record. 

The Presidents of Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, and Haverford con- 
sult at regular intervals to further cooperative arrangements between 
their respective institutions. 

SPECIAL PLANS OF STUDY IN PREPARATION 
FOR PROFESSIONS 

A large number of Haverford College students desire, after grad- 
uation, to enter upon courses of study fitting them for professions. 
For students desiring preparation for the professional schools in 
Engineering, Medicine, and other highly specialized subjects the 
College offers combinations of courses which will prepare its grad- 
uates for admission, with full standing and in many cases with 
advanced credit, to the best professional schools in the country. 

To illustrate this feature of the curriculum sample outlines of 
study preparatory to specialization in Engineering, Medicine, Law, 
and Business Administration are presented on the following pages. 



Preparation for Professions 



31 



Similar outlines might be prepared for other professions, such as 
Teaching, the Ministry, Journalism, Industrial Chemistry, etc. In 
makins: his choice of courses, the student must consult with the 
Dean and the professors concerned. 

Each of the following outlines is, of course, only a sample, pre- 
senting one among many possibilities, and is not intended to be 
a prescribed program. 

PREPARATION FOR ENGINEERING 

Engineering today covers an extremely broad field of service, and 
there is, accordingly, no standard type of training suitable for all 
students preparing themselves for an engineering career. A typical 
four-year course in general engineering follows: 



Freshman Year 
Principles of Engineering Drawing and 

Shop Methods 
Engineering Orientation and Surveying 
Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 

Analysis 
Mathematics 

English Composition and Literature 
Foreign Language 

Junior Year 
Elements of Applied Electricity 
Alternating Currents 
Thermodynamics 
Fluid Mechanics 
Materials of Engineering 
Advanced Calculus and Differential 

Equations 
Government and Business 
Introduction to Sociology 
Industry and Society 
Seminar in Engineering 



Sophomore Year 
Kinematics of Machines 
Analytical Mechanics 
General Physics 
Calculus 

Elementary Economics 
American History 



Senior Year 
Heat Engineering 
Strength of Materials 
Machine Design 
Special Project in Engineering 
Internal Combustion Engines 
Accounting (or Statistics) 
English Elective 
The Corporation 
Labor Policies and Business 

Management 
Seminar in Engineering 



PREPARATION FOR MEDICINE 

In consequence of the relatively large number of students who 
prepare for medical school at Haverford, the premedical program 
has become a distinctive feature of the work of the College. The 
program is under the direction of the Premedical Committee of the 
Faculty (see page 21) , the members of which stand ready to advise 
students on matters of premedical interest. The program makes 
provision not only for the necessary courses in the premedical 
sciences but also for a sufficient number of courses in the non-science 
fields to ensure the student a well-balanced education. Over-special- 
ization in science in the premedical course is not encouraged by the 
College nor by the medical schools. The required courses in the 
premedical sciences number 8 (8I/2 if the study of chemistry is 



32 Haverford College 

begun in college) , so that an ample number of courses remain to 
meet any special requirements of the medical schools and the 
requirements of the College in limited electives, as well as to enable 
the student to choose a Major in accord with his scholastic interest. 
A premedical student is free to choose any Major for which he is 
qualified, but he must do creditable work in the premedical sciences 
in order to secure a favorable recommendation to medical school. 
The program of studies which satisfies adequately the require- 
ments for admission to medical school includes the courses listed 
below. Those in the premedical sciences should be taken in the 
years indicated in order to avoid schedule conflicts. 
First Year: General Biology (Biology la, \h) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chemistry 2a) 

Qualitative Analysis (Chemistry 3&) 

Freshman Mathematics (Mathematics \a, \b) 

Elementary German or French 
(German or French la, 16) 

Second Year: Organic Chemistry (Chemistry 5a, 6&) 

General Physics (Physics la, 1& or 2a, 26) 
Elementary Psychology (Psychology la, 16) 
Intermediate German or French 
(German or French 2a, 26) 

Third Year: Quantitative Analysis (Chemistry 4a) 

Premedical Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 96) 
Vertebrate Morphology: Embryology and Anatomy 
(Biology 3a, 36) 

Certain medical schools have additional specific requirements: 
Johns Hopkins University requires both French and German, and 
also elementary Latin; the University of Pennsylvania requires 
English literature; the University of Michigan requires botany; 
Harvard and Johns Hopkins require advanced organic chemistry; 
and so on. The premedical student must see to it that such special 
requirements of the medical school of his choice are met in his 
college program. Many medical schools advise that English, sociol- 
ogy, economics, philosophy, and other courses in non-science sub- 
jects be included in the premedical program. If American history 
has not been studied in high school, it must be taken in college in 
order to meet a requirement of State Boards of Medical Licensure. 
A premedical aptitude test, prepared by the Association of American 



Preparation for Professions 33 

Medical Colleges, is given each year, usually in December, and this 
must be taken by all candidates for admission to medical school in 
that year. Due notice of the date for this test will be given. 

PREPARATION FOR THE LAW 

Even those law schools which require that a person must hold a 
college degree to be eligible for admission do not usually specify 
what studies he shall have pursued in his undergraduate course. 
It is obvious, however, that a choice of electives may be made which 
will be of great value to the student in the study of law and later 
in the practice of his profession. It is recommended that the follow- 
ing courses be included in a student's program. In the case of 
those advanced courses which are given only in alternate years some 
variation in this program may be necessary. 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 
English Composition and Literature American History 
Foreign Language, preferably Latin Elementary Economics 
A Modern Foreign Language Contemporary Legislation 
Mathematics English, Mediaeval, or Modem Euro- 
American Federal Government pean History 

State and Local Government 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Elementary Psychology American History 

English Constitutional History English Literature 

Roman Law English, Mediaeval, or Modern Euro- 
Government and Business pean History 

Constitutional Law The Corporation 

Accounting Government Finance 

Development of Political Thought 

PREPARATION FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Students planning to continue study at a graduate school of busi- 
ness administration or to engage directly in business might arrange 
their programs for their Freshman and Sophomore years as above 
suggested for those planning to study law, but for their Junior and 
Senior years the following courses are recommended. 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Industry and Society Ethics 

Labor Organization and Business National Income and Investment 

Management International Trade and Finance 

Money and Banking Government and Business 

Accounting 

Introduction to Statistics 
The Corporation 



34 Haverford College 

Students expecting to enter manufacturing industries in any 
capacity are encouraged to take courses in Chemistry, Engineering, 
or Physics in order to become acquainted with the general nature of 
the processes and techniques involved in modern manufacturing. 

PREPARATION FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Students who are interested in entering the government service 
for work in Public Administration should have courses in Elemen- 
tary Economics, American History and Government, National 
Income and Investment, Political Theory, Government Finance, 
Accounting, Statistics, Public Administration, Constitutional Law, 
and Government and Business. 

Each year the United States Government holds an examination 
for filling vacancies in the field of Public Administration, which is 
covered by these courses given by the College. 

GRADING OF STUDENTS 

In determining the standing of the student, daily recitations, hour 
examinations, and final examinations are all considered. Reports, 
with numerical grades and averages, are issued at the end of each 
term. 

Freshmen are expected to obtain a general average for the year of 
at least 60 for promotion to the Sophomore class; Sophomores are 
required to obtain a general average for the year of at least 65 for 
promotion to the Junior class; Juniors, 70 for promotion to the Senior 
class; and Seniors, 70 for graduation. Students who fail to make 
promotion averages will normally be dropped from college. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student who achieves a grade of 50-60 (E) as his term mark in 
any course is allowed a special examination in September following 
the failure (on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday immediately pre- 
ceding the opening of College) . Seniors who achieve 50-60 in any 
course (except in the Major Examination, see page 28) are permitted 
to take the special examination during Commencement Week. These 
examinations, known as make-up examinations, are scheduled only 
upon written request by the student and on the payment of the fee 
of $5.00 for each examination. The request and the fee must be 
received by the Registrar ten days before the opening of College in 
September. Late applicants are subject to an additional fee of $5.00. 



Delinquent Students 35 

A student who achieves a grade below 50 is not permitted to take 
a special examination in that course. 

A student with 50 or below as his term grade, or with 50-60 as his 
term grade in any course after the special examination privilege has 
lapsed or after taking a special examination, must repeat the course 
if it is a required course (repeated courses are recorded and averaged 
in the year of repetition) , or may substitute some other course if 
the failure is an elective course. No course may be repeated more 
than once; failure to pass a repeated required course will conse- 
quently prevent a student from obtaining this degree. 

A fee of |15 per term is charged for all repeated or substituted 
courses. 

When a student drops a course, an arbitrary grade of 40 shall be 
recorded by the Registrar unless the instructor turns in a lower 
grade, except that in unusual cases, with the permission of the 
instructor in the course and the Dean, a course may be dropped 
without a recorded grade. All recorded grades will be included in 
the semester average. 

A course, once reported to the College ofi&ce, shall not be removed 
from the student's record. In the case of failure this shall apply, even 
though the credit deficiency has been made up by taking an extra 
course in a subsequent semester, or applying a credit previously 
obtained. If a student fails a course and wishes to make up the credit 
deficiency by taking an extra course in the subsequent term, he shall 
be granted permission only if he first forfeits all right to re-examina- 
tion in his failed course. 

A Sophomore who fails to attain promotion average (see page 34) , 
and who has not more than two failures, may have the privilege of 
taking re-examinations in the two half-courses in which he has 
received the lowest grades, provided that these grades be better 
than F. A Senior or Junior who fails to attain promotion average 
(see page 34) , and who has not more than one failure, may take a 
re-examination in the course of one term in which he has received 
the lowest grade, provided that this grade be better than F. 

Any student whose record is such as to justify the belief that he is 
not availing himself of the opportunities offered by Haverford Col- 
lege may be dropped. Usually a student who has failures against 
him in more than two one-term courses at the opening of College 
in September will be dropped. 



DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

Students who have received credit for the full number of courses 
in prescribed and elective studies, provided they have attained a 
general average of 70 or above for the Junior and Senior years 
respectively, and provided they have passed their Major examina- 
tions with a grade of 70 or above, are granted the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The normal degree conferred upon 
all candidates meeting these requirements is that of Bachelor of 
Arts. However, upon request by the candidate and approval by 
the department concerned, the Bachelor of Science degree will be 
granted to men majoring in Natural Science, Mathematics, or 
Engineering. The fee for the Bachelor's degree is $15. 

Master of Arts and Master of Science 

Admission to Candidacy. — Graduates of Haverford College or an 
institution of equivalent standing, who present satisfactory evidence 
of character, seriousness of purpose, and scholarly attainments, may 
be admitted as candidates for the degree of Master of Arts or Master 
of Science. A candidate should have a reading knowledge of one 
foreign language, ancient or modern. 

Requirements. — A candidate who is well prepared for advanced 
study in his special field is required to pass four advanced courses 
(each with a grade of not less than 80) * and to do satisfactory addi- 
tional intensive work, which may take the form of a thesis or other 
research, equivalent at least to a full course. At least two of the 
courses and the additional intensive work must be in the same field 
and the remaining courses in allied subjects. In addition, the candi- 
date may be required, at the discretion of the professor in charge, 
to pass a comprehensive examination upon the field of his Major 
subject. The scope of the examination will be determined by the 
professor in charge, and will be communicated to the candidate 
when he is admitted as a graduate student. The entire plan of 
study must be drawn up by the candidate in consultation with the 
professor under whom he proposes to do the major part of his work. 
This plan must be submitted for approval before October 1 to the 
Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Students. After approval 

*In a full-year course in which credit is not granted for the work of a single term, the course 
grade is the average of the two term grades ; in other cases each term's work is a separate course, 
for the purposes of this requirement. 

36 



Master's Degree 37 

by this Committee, the program must be filed with the Registrar. 
Before award of the Master's degree the candidate must deposit two 
copies of his thesis in the College Library. 

A minimum of one year's residence is required, and a candidate, 
if well prepared, should be able to complete his work for the degree 
in this time. If his preparation is inadequate, a longer period of 
residence may be necessary, but candidates for the Master's degree 
must complete the required work in not more than two academic 
years. Courses taken before the registration of the candidate as a 
graduate student at Haverford College will not usually be counted 
toward the degree. 

Candidates who engage in any occupation or employment other 
than graduate study will not generally be able to satisfy the require- 
ments for the degree in one year. 

Fellowships. — Six graduate fellowships of $800 each are available 
every year primarily for members of the Society of Friends and for 
the graduates of other Friends' Colleges in the United States, who 
wish to proceed with their education in any department of Haverford 
College, provided the candidate and his proposed schedules of study 
are approved by the Committee on Graduate Students. Any recipi- 
ent of a graduate fellowship should have additional resources of 
at least $300. Students must board and reside at Haverford College 
unless, by arrangement with the Dean, they live at the neighboring 
Quaker community of Pendle Hill. 

Applications should be accompanied by the following records: 
a certified list of the applicant's courses and grades as an under- 
graduate; a statement of his draft status; three letters concerning 
the character, personality, financial condition, and qualifications of 
the applicant; a copy of the catalog of the institution in which the 
applicant was an undergraduate; and a small photograph. Appli- 
cations and other material should be in the hands of the Dean of 
Haverford College before March 1 to secure consideration for the 
following year. 

Charges. — For charges and fees see pp. 40-42. 



HONORS 

Honors are awarded for excellence in the studies of single depart- 
ments. They are never given merely for performance of routine work 
in courses; a considerable amount of extra work is demanded in 
every case. 

Honors are of three kinds: Honorable Mention, Preliminary 
Honors, and Final Honors. 

Honorable Mention* will be awarded at the end of the Freshman 
or Sophomore years for work in a single course meeting at least two 
hours per week throughout the year, and additional work to the 
total amount of not less than 75 hours. Candidates for Honorable 
Mention must obtain a minimum grade of 85 in the regular work 
of the course and creditably pass an examination on the additional 
work required. Two courses of one term each in the same depart- 
ment may be construed as a single course. 

A Freshman who has received the prescribed grade in the regular 
work of a course required for Honorable Mention, but who has not 
done the additional work required in connection with that course, 
may do so, with the consent of the professor in charge, during the 
Sophomore year. 

Preliminary Honors will be awarded at the end of the Sophomore 
or Junior year for work in not less than two courses of two terms 
each in a single department, and additional work to the total amount 
of not less than 150 hours. Candidates for Preliminary Honors must 
obtain a minimum average grade of 85 in the courses required for 
such honors (including a grade satisfactory to the Department in 
the courses taken in the Sophomore or Junior year) , and must 
creditably pass examinations on the additional work required. 

Final Honors are graded as Honors, High Honors, or Highest 
Honors. They will be awarded upon graduation only to students 
whose work in a Major field of concentration has been done with 
marked distinction and has been more profound or more extensive 
in its scope than the minimum required. The award of Honors is 
at the discretion of the Major Department, but the award of High or 
Highest Honors is to be made by vote of the Faculty upon recom- 
mendation of a department or group of related departments. In order 
to receive High or Highest Honors, the student will usually be given 
a public oral examination, and for Highest Honors the verdict of 
an outside examiner may be obtained if deemed desirable. The vari- 

* Honorable mention is awarded in Freshman English in connection with the work of the 
second term (English 2b). 

38 



Honors 39 

ous departments and divisions will adopt such specifications for 
Final Honors as they see fit. 
B At the time of the award of Honors one-half of one per cent for 

I each award of Honorable Mention or Preliminary Honors shall be 
added to each recipient's general average for the year. Honors, 
High Honors, and Highest Honors shall automatically add one, 
two, and three per cent, respectively, to the average for the Senior 
year of each student receiving one of these awards. 



FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS 

ROOMS 

Entering Freshmen are assigned rooms in the order in which their 
application blanks for admission (see page 22) are received. It is, of 
course, not always possible to meet the desire of Freshmen for the 
cheapest rooms. Twelve of the $100 rooms are regularly reserved for 
Freshmen. The College assumes that a new student will accept any 
available room of approximately the same price as the room for 
which a preference is expressed. The choice of rooms by other stu- 
dents is governed by published rules. 

A deposit of $15 is required of all students, old and new, before 
a room is reserved. This amount will be deducted from his bill for 
the following year. If he fails to occupy the room, the deposit will 
be forfeited, unless the student is excluded by the College for fail- 
ures or other sufficient reasons, in which case the fee will be refunded. 

Students are expected to treat their own and College property with 
the same consideration as in their own homes. A student is held 
financially responsible for any damage to his room, and any damage 
wilfully done will be sufficient reason for requesting withdrawal 
from the College. 

The College does not hold itself responsible for the safekeeping 
of private property left by the students in their rooms, or elsewhere 
on the campus. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition charge for all regular students is $450 for the academic 
year. Tuition for special students is $60 per course per term. The 
total charge for tuition, board ($12 per week) , and room rent ($100 
to $225, according to location) varies from $958 to $1,108 for the 
year. These charges, which are subject to alteration by the Board 
of Managers, include heat, electric light, attendance, and the use of 
necessary bedroom furniture, i.e. a bureau and a bed, the linen for 
which is furnished and laundered by the College. Students will 
supply their own study furniture, blankets, and towels. In general, 
two students share one study and each has his private bedroom 
adjoining. A few single rooms are also available. 

The College requires that bills rendered October 1 for three-fifths 
of the student's total cash indebtedness for the current fall and spring 

40 



Expenses 41 

terms for room, board, and tuition must be paid in full before 
November 1 . Those rendered February 1 for the balance of the fall 
and spring terms must be paid in full before March 1. Bills for the 
summer term rendered July 1 must be paid in full before August I . 
Failure to pay within the specified period automatically cancels the 
student's registration. 

No reduction or refund of the tuition charge will be made on 
account of absence, illness, or dismissal during the year. If the stu- 
dent shall withdraw or be absent from College for any reason, there 
will be no reduction or refund because of failure to occupy the room 
assigned for that semester. In case of illness or absence for any other 
reasons from the College for six weeks or more, there will be a pro- 
portionate reduction for board provided that notice is given to 
the Comptroller at the time of withdrawal. Fees cannot be refunded 
for any reason whatsoever. 

Additional expenses include textbooks, which need not exceed 
|25-$40 a year, and various fees and special charges (see below) . 

MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

Since some parents may prefer to pay tuition and other college 
fees in equal monthly installments during the academic year, we 
are glad to offer this convenience under The Tuition Plan. The 
cost is 4% greater than when payment is made in cash at the begin- 
ning of each term. 

FEES AND SPECIAL CHARGES 

Supplementary Tuition Fees 
(For regular tuition charge, see p. 40) 

(1) |25 per semester — for extra {i.e., sixth) course. (No refund 
when the extra course is dropped after the first two weeks 
of a semester.) 

(2) $15 per semester — for every repeated or substituted course. 

Deposits 

(1) $15 — for room reservation (deducted when room is occupied; 
refunded when student is dropped by the College) . 

(2) $20 per term — for incidentals (balance to be refunded at end 
of term) . 

(3) $5 — for Chemistry Laboratory breakage (balance to be re- 
funded at the end of term) to be paid by each student for 
each Chemistry course taken. 



42 Haverford College 

Examination Fees 

(1) $5 — for each make-up examination. 

(2) |25 — for re-examination in Major Comprehensive at other 
than regular time. 

Fees for Degrees 

(1) $15 — for Bachelor's Degree. 

(2) $20 — for Master's Degree. 

Other Special Fees 

(1) $15 per year — for Student Activities. 

(2) $1.50 per semester — for the use of radios. 

(3) $5 per day — for residence in the Infirmary beyond one week. 

(4) Laboratory fees — see announcements of courses under Astron- 
omy, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Physics. 

"Too Late" Fines 

(1) $5 — for late registration at beginning of semester. 

(2) $5 — for application for make-up examination received less 
than ten days before the opening of college in September. 

(3) $15 — for dropping a course more than two weeks after be- 
ginning of semester. 

(4) $5 — for filing Major Program with Dean after set date. 

LOAN FUND 

A loan fund is available for deserving students, other than mem- 
bers of the Freshman Class and transfer students during their first 
year, who may require financial assistance during their college course. 

PLACEMENT BUREAU 

Plans are being carried out for the development of a more effec- 
tive Placement Bureau for those who wish to avail themselves of 
this service. Information regarding opportunities for employment 
is being gathered for undergraduates and graduates who wish 
assistance in securing employment. Part-time work is found for 
those who desire it while in college. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The College Administration has delegated to the Students' Asso- 
ciation the responsibility for nearly all aspects of student conduct 
on the campus; and the Students' Association has assumed this 
responsibility. Student Government is exercised through an elected 
Students' Council, on which are representatives of all the classes 
and of some of the undergraduate organizations. 

The students at Haverford College believe that the success of 
self-government depends upon personal honor and individual quali- 
ties of moral integrity and social responsibility. The basis, there- 
fore, of Student Government at Haverford is the Honor System, 
which is a compact entered into by all members of the Students' 
Association. The Honor System upholds certain standards which 
represent the considered opinion of the Students' Association on 
what is desirable conduct on the campus. It is not restricted to the 
conduct of examinations and the preparation of papers outside of 
class. It covers every phase of college life. It applies to such college 
requirements as attendance at Tuesday Collection and Thursday 
Meeting, to the rules governing the presence of women in the dormi- 
tories, and to other standing regulations, which are enforced through 
the Students' Council with the active cooperation of all members ofi 
the Students' Association. 

The Students' Council is an administrative and judicial body. It 
handles all phases of the administration of regulations for the 
Students' Association. It manages the operation of extra-curricular 
activities on the campus and allocates to each a percentage of the 
Student Activities Fee ($15 per year, charged to every undergradu- 
ate) on the basis of a yearly budget. In intercollegiate relations it 
serves as the representative of the Haverford student body. 

The chairmanship of the Students' Council is the most important 
undergraduate office. The Chairman represents the student body 
before the Board of Managers, the College Administration, and the 
Faculty. He serves both as liaison officer and executive. He conveys 
to the College Administration the recommendations of the Students' 
Council in disciplinary matters. 

The Honor Pledge, which is quoted below, is called to the atten- 
tion of each applicant for admission to Haverford College. It is 

43 



44 Haverford College 

signed upon entrance, and is signed again whenever the student 
takes an examination, though its force is not limited to examina- 
tions only. In signing the pledge the individual student accepts the 
Honor System in its entirety, as currently in force and as it may be 
changed while he is an undergraduate at Haverford. Every enter- 
ing student should make sure, before selecting Haverford, that he 
can give his active support to the Honor System. He should realize 
that its success, which is of great importance to him personally and 
to the whole student body, and indeed to the College itself, depends 
upon his willingness to give it his complete support. 

Honor Pledge 
I hereby accept the Haverford College Honor System, realizing 
that it is my responsibility to safeguard, uphold, and preserve each 
part of the Honor System and the attitude of personal and collective 
honor upon which it is based. 

SOCIETIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

The Students' Association. This organization is composed of all 
undergraduates in good standing at Haverford. It is the body for 
student self-government at Haverford. On its Council are represen- 
tatives of the four classes and of publications. 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Haverford Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society is Zeta of Pennsylvania, chartered in 1898. Elections at 
Haverford are held for students at the end of the Junior year and 
at the end of the Senior year. 

Founders Club. This Haverford honorary society, established in 
1914 as an organization of students, alumni, and faculty, seeks to 
recognize by election to its membership those undergraduates who 
combine a sound academic record with noteworthy participation in 
extra-curricular activities. Elections are usually made from the 
Junior and Senior classes, except in unusual cases where Sophomores 
are chosen. 

Cap and Bells Club. The Haverford dramatic organization, com- 
posed of graduates and undergraduates, sponsors dramatic produc- 
tions. The Club has collaborated with those of Bryn Mawr and 
Swarthmore in putting on plays and musical productions. 

Nautical Club. The Club provides intercollegiate racing and gen- 
eral sailing for members who have had some experience and those 
who desire to learn to sail. It keeps four dinghies on the Delaware 
River. Intercollegiate meets are held each semester and teams have 



Student Activities 45 

gone to Annapolis, Boston, and the Coast Guard Academy in 
New London. 

Radio Club. A campus broadcasting station is operated as Sta- 
tion WHAV, Programs are presented throughout the year. 

Other Organizations. The following groups are also active at 
Haverford: Glee Club, Varsity Club, Debate Council, Biology Club, 
Chemistry Club, Classical Symposium, Engineering Club, Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Mathematics-Physics Club. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Haverford Review, published two or three times annually, is 
an illustrated alumni magazine, devoted to the interests of the entire 
Haverford community. It provides a forum for the discussion of the 
problems and functions of the small liberal arts college in America. 
Annual subscription $1. Enquiries should be addressed to The Man- 
aging Editor, The Haverford Review, Haverford College. 

The Haverford News, a student publication, appears weekly dur- 
ing the college year. Each issue contains a section of Alumni news. 

The Record, Senior yearbook, is distributed immediately before 
commencement. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The normal course at Haverford College, except in modern lan- 
guages, is three hours per week. The laboratory equivalent for a lec- 
ture hour is customarily two and one half hours. Variations in this 
general rule are noted in the listing of the particular course. Some 
of the courses listed are not offered during the current year. 

ASTRONOMY 

The William J. Strawbridge Memorial Observatory enables stu- 
dents to become familiar with a variety of astronomical instruments, 
and to acquire from actual observation a practical acquaintance 
with astronomy. 

The equipment consists of three equatorially mounted telescopes; 
a 10-inch and a 414-inch refractor and a 6-inch reflector; a reflecting 
telescope with 8-inch mirror and altazimuth mounting; a meridian 
circle telescope of 3 34 -inch aperture; a zenith telescope of 2 14 -inch 
aperture; a spectrohelioscope; an astrographic mounting provided 
with two 4-inch Ross lenses and a 4-inch guiding telescope; two 
sidereal clocks; a chronograph by Bond; and other instruments. The 
astronomical library is housed in the Observatory. 

Major Requirements 

Astronomy la and five one-term courses to be chosen from Astronomy 2b; 5a, 
6b; 7a, 8b; 9a, 10b. Three courses to be chosen from Mathematics 2, 3, and 
Physics 2, 3. 

A comprehensive examination, partly oral, based on the subject matter of the 
above-named courses. 

la. Descriptive Astronomy — Mr. Green. 

A general course open to all students. 

The leading facts of astronomy, with elementary explanation of the methods 
and instruments by which they are ascertained. A portion of the time is devoted 
to the study of the constellations, the handling of the telescopes, and simple 
problems. No fee. 

2b. Celestial Navigation — Mr. Green and Mr. Macintosh. 

The determination of position and course at sea and in the air by trigonometric, 
graphical, and tabular methods. Mathematical aspects of piloting, such as the 
problems of interception and of return to a moving base, will be emphasized. 
Sextant observations will be taken and reduced. Prerequisite, Plane Trigonometry. 
A fee of $7.00 per semester is charged. 

5a, 6b. Observational Astronomy — Mr. Green. 

Determination of latitude, longitude, and time. Visual and photographic ob- 
servations of the sun, moon, planets, and stars. Spectroscopic observations of the 
sun. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

7a, 8b. Celestial Mechanics and Orbit Determination — Mr. Green. 

An introduction to mathematical astronomy. Prerequisite, Mathematics 3, or in 
conjunction with Mathematics 3. No fee. 

46 



Courses in Biblical Literature 47 

9a, 10b. Astrophysics — Mr. Green. 

A study of the state of matter in interstellar space, in the atmospheres of the 
stars, and in their interiors. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathetnatics 2. No fee. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

The courses in this Department are designed to cover broadly the 
history, literature, and religion of the Bible, with their backgrounds 
in the culture in which they developed and to which they contributed. 
Additional courses are offered in the ancient history of the Near East, 
the Hebrew language, and comparative religion. Sufficient scope is 
thus provided to meet the varied interests of students electing courses 
in the Department and to offer either introductory or advanced work. 

A gift enabled the late Professor Grant to make a series of five field 
excavations at a site in Palestine, the archaeological yields of which 
are exhibited in the Beth Shemesh Museum, third floor of Sharpless 
Hall. These materials reveal the life of a typical Near East commu- 
nity in the many aspects of its development and interplay with other 
peoples over a span of 2000 years. Thus, the collections provide a 
laboratory for study of the cultural cross-currents which met in 
Palestine during one of the great formative periods of civilization. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Biblical Literature. 

Six other half-year courses in either Biblical Literature or related departments. 

Special study of one selected Biblical field, e.g., history, literature, the Old or 
New Testament. 

A comprehensive examination covering the history, literature, and criticism of 
the Bible; and the religious and moral life of the Hebrews, Jews, and Christians. 

la. Introduction to the Old and New Testaments — Mr. Flight. 
The literature of the Bible with its historical background. 

2b. The Rise of Christianity — Mr. Flight. 

A study of the background, early development, and spread of the Christian 
movement, up to the third century, as reflected in the New Testament, par- 
ticularly in the book of Acts and the letters of Paul and in the writings of the 
Church Fathers. 

4b. Development of Christian Thought within the Bible — Mr. Flight. 

A study of the origins and development of the basic ideas in the teaching of 
religious leaders from the prophets to Paul. 

6b. Comparative Religion — Mr. Flight. 

A comparative study of the great living religions, their founders, their scrip- 
tures, their characteristic ideas and ideals. 

7a. Ancient History of the Near East — Mr. Flight. 

The Beginnings of Western Civilization in the Cultures of the Near East; 
Archaeological and Historical. 

(Also called History 7a.) 

8b. The English Bible — Mr. Flight. 

History and literary art of the English Bible, particularly the King James version 
and its influence on general literature. 

(Also called English 8b.) 



48 Haverford College 

9a or 10b. Biblical and Oriental Conference — Mr. Flight. 

Individual work to be elected by the student from one or more of the following 
divisions of the field: literature, archaeology, history, philosophy. Prerequisite, 

other work in the Department, in which a grade of B has been attained. 

11. Hebrew — Mr. Flight. 

Grammar, composition, and reading of simple Old Testament prose. 

BIOLOGY 

The Department of Biology offers courses for students who wish 
to enter medical school; for students who wish to engage in graduate 
work, teaching, or conservation; and for students who wish a general 
knowledge of plants and animals. 

Most medical schools require General Zoology for admission. 
Vertebrate Morphology is required by some and advised by others. 
General Botany is required by a few. Most graduate schools require, 
as a prerequisite for work in Biology, a reading knowledge of French 
and German; Chemistry la or 2a and Sb, ba, 6b; Physics 1 or 2 
(or Geography and Geology 1, depending on the student's field of 
interest) ; and at least Biology 1 and 2a, 2b. For advanced experi- 
mental Biology, Chemistry 5a, 6b may be necessary. 

A gift from the class of 1915 enables the Department to house and 
display the extensive collections of the College so that they are 
available to anyone interested in the natural history of the Phila- 
delphia area. 

Major Requirements 

Biology 1, 2a, 2b, 7, and one of 3, 4, and 5. 

Two courses chosen from Physics 1 or 2, Chemistry la or 2a and 3b, Math. 13b, 
and Geography and Geology 1. 

Reading and reporting on approximately 15 biological books, besides those read 
in connection with courses. This is to be done at any time between the end of 
Sophomore year and date of the comprehensive examination. 

A comprehensive examination on the courses taken and the reading done is 
required. This examination will be partly written (approximately 4 hours) and 
partly oral. 

1. General Zoology — Four hours. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry, and Mr. F. C. Evans. 
The lectures of this course include a survey of the structure and relationships of 
animals, of the fundamental principles of living organisms, and an outline of the 
more important questions relating to evolution, heredity, and distribution. The 
laboratory periods are devoted to obtaining an acquaintance with the more impor- 
tant types of animal life. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. A fee of 
$8.00 per semester is charged. 

2a. General Botany — Four hours. Mr. Henry. 

The fundamental principles of Botany and the application of plant science to 
human welfare are discussed in the lectures. The laboratory work consists of a 
study of the morphology, physiology, and life history of representatives of the 
principal groups of plants. This is a brief course designed to fit the needs of the 
student not majoring in science. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

2b. Systematic Botany — Mr. Henry. 

This course, a continuation of Biology 2a, consists of a systematic study of the 
major plant groups. Prerequisite, Biology 2a. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 



Courses in Biology 49 

3. Verlebrate Morphology (Anatomy and Embryology) — Three hours. Mr. 
Dunn and Mr. Henry. 

The laboratory work of this course includes the dissection of the principal types 
of vertebrates. The lectures deal with the development, status, and history of the 
organ systems of vertebrates. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

4. Local Flora — Mr. Henry. 

The work of this course consists of the identification of representative Angio- 
sperms, together with the study of their taxonomy and distribution. Collecting in 
the field will supplement laboratory work. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, Biology 2a and 2b. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

5. Entomology — Mr. Henry. 

This course has been designed to give the student a knowledge of the anatomy 
and physiology of insects. The laboratory work consists of the dissection of a rep- 
resentative of each of the larger Orders. Particular emphasis is placed on the 
structures used in identification, and permanent mounts are made of many of 
them. The preparation of local collections is required as part of the work. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 
per semester is charged. 

7. Evolution, Heredity, and Other General Biological Problems — Mr. Dunn. 
This is a general cultural course, intended not only for students of Biology, but 
for all who wish to be informed on recent developments in the field of biology, 
especially for students of Sociology, Philosophy, and History. Special emphasis is 
given to the modern theories of evolution and of heredity. Open, without pre- 
requisite, to Juniors and Seniors. No fee. 

10. Seminar Courses — Required of candidates for Honors in Biology. 

Open only by permission of the instructor. 

Vertebrate Zoology — Classification and evolution of vertebrate groups. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 1, Biology 3 or with Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Advanced Morphology — Study of morphological problems in animals. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Ecology and Distribution — Problems of habitat relationships or geographical 
relationships of plants and/or animals. Prerequisite, Biology 1 or Biology 2a and 
8h. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry, and Mr. F. C. Evans. 

Genetics — Problems of Genetics. Primarily for Graduate Students. Mr. Dunn. 

Advanced Botany — Studies in comparative anatomy of plants. Prerequsite, 
Biology 2a, 4, 8b. Mr. Henry. No fixed fee. 

CHEMISTRY 

The courses in Chemistry are all listed as one-semester courses. 
When they are taken in certain sequences they afford a developing 
knowledge of the science. Chemistry la and 2a (or 2b) are of a 
general nature, dealing with the fundamentals of the subject with 
some application of the scientific method. Chemistry 2a (or 2b) is 
prerequisite to all other courses in the Department. Freshmen 
electing chemistry will normally take Chemistry la and 2b, in the 
first and second semesters respectively; but those who have had 
chemistry in school may be permitted to take Chemistry 2a in the 
first semester and to continue with Chemistry 36 in the second. If a 
Freshman takes Chemistry la and 2b in his first year and wishes to 



50 Haverford College 

continue with chemistry, he must make provision to take Chemis- 
try Sb in the second semester of his Sophomore year. 

The courses approved by the American Chemical Society for the 
professional education of chemists, which should be completed by 
students expecting to apply either for admission to the universities 
as graduate students in chemistry or for professional positions in 
industrial chemistry, include those listed for the Major (see below) 
together with Chemistry lib and \6b. Chemistry 7a and Sb, but 
not 9b, meet the requirement in physical chemistry. For the chem- 
istry courses required for premedical preparation see page 32. 

Major Requirements 

The requirements for the Chemistry Major may be met by either of the follow- 
ing programs of courses: 

(1) Primarily for prospective chemists and chemical engineers: Chemistry 2a, 
3b, 4a, 5a, 6b, 7a, 8b, 13a, 15b; Mathematics 2; Physics 2; German 2. 

(2) Primarily for premedical students: Chemistry 2a, 3b, 4a, 5a, 6b, 9b (or 
7a and 8b) , 13a, 17a; Biology 1, 3; Physics 1 or 2. 

Candidates for final honors in chemistry are required to take, during the 
Junior and Senior years, at least three of the short seminar courses offered by 
the Department, such as Chemical German Reading, History of Chemistry, Glass- 
blowing, and Recent Advances in Chemistry. 

la. Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have not had chemistry in school. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the fundamentals of chemistry, the 
preparation, properties, and uses of the more common elements and their com- 
pounds, and the application of the general principles of chemistry to industrial 
processes. A fee of $5.00 is charged. 

2a or 2b. Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Cadbury. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have had chemistry in school 
or who have passed Chemistry la. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with fundamental principles, the extrac- 
tion and properties of metals, the periodic law, aqueous solutions and the ionic 
theory, and the structure of atoms and molecules. A fee of $5.00 is charged. 

3b. Qualitative Analysis — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Purnell. 

Lectures on reaction kinetics and the application of the ionic theory to analyti- 
cal processes and to electrolytic phenomena. The systematic qualitative analysis 
of inorganic materials using the semimicro method constitutes the laboratory work. 
A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2a or 2b. 

4a. Quantitative Analysis — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Cadbury. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the general principles of gravimetric, 
volumetric, electrolytic, and colorimetric methods of analysis. A fee of $6.00 is 
charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 3b and Mathematics la. 

5a, 6b. Organic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

A study of aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds. In the laboratory 
experiments illustrating the synthesis and chemical properties of such substances 
are carried out. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2. 

7a, 8b. Physical Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A study of the general properties of matter using both the kinetic and thermo- 
dynamic methods, coUigative and electrolytic properties of solutions, reaction 



Courses in Chemistry 51 

velocity and catalysis, adsorption, colloids, and the phase rule. The laboratory 
work involves illustrative physico-chemical measurements. A fee of $5.00 is charged. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 4a and Mathematics 2. 

9b. Premedical Physical Chemistry — Three hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A lecture and conference course dealing particularly with those phases of 
physical chemistry which find application in physiology, physiological chemistry, 
and other medical school subjects. Among the topics discussed are: gases and 
solutions, hydrogen ion concentration and pVi and their measurement, reaction 
velocity and catalysis, enzyme action, adsorption, and colloids. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 4a. 

11a. Chemical Thermodynamics — Three hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A detailed study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics and their 
application to chemical systems; the development and use of the third law. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 7a and 8b, and Mathematics 2. 

13a. Advanced Organic Chemistry — Three hours. Mr. Jones. 

A study of stereochemistry, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, essential 
oils, and alkaloids. The laboratory work involves the identification of organic 
substances by classification reactions and by the preparation of derivatives. A fee 
of 15.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5a and 6h. 

14b. Organic Syntheses — Three hours. Mr. Jones. 

A study of organo-metallic compounds, rearrangements, unsaturated systems, 
and special preparative reactions of organic chemistry. Special syntheses consti- 
tute the laboratory work. A fee of $7.50 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5a 
and 6b. 

15b. Advanced Quantitative Analysis — Three hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

Lectures and conferences dealing with general methods for the quantitative 
determination of the elements and the analysis of industrial materials. The lab- 
oratory work includes the complete quantitative analysis of certain inorganic 
materials. A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 4a. 

16b. Advanced Quantitative Analysis — Three hours. Mr. Jones. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with micro, semimicro, and other special 
methods of quantitative analysis. A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chem- 
istry 4a, 5a, and 6b. 

Via. or 18b. Chemical Research — Mr. Meldrum, Mr. Cadbury, and Mr. Jones. 
Open only to Senior Chemistry Majors and to graduate students in chemistry. 
May be elected as one or more courses. No fixed fee. 

20b. Chemistry Major — Mr. Meldrum, Mr. Cadbury, and Mr. Jones. 

Seniors majoring in chemistry will meet with members of the Staff for one 
hour per week for a critical discussion of the chemical principles studied in the 
courses and the application of these principles to modern developments in the 
science. 

21a, 22b. Special Topics in Theoretical Chemistry — Mr. Meldrum. 
Open only to graduate students in chemistry. No fee. 

ECONOMICS 

The instruction in Economics is intended primarily to give stu- 
dents an understanding of the working of modern economic society. 
The advanced courses are designed to give a liberal education and 
to arouse an informed interest in public aflEairs, as well as to meet 
the needs of men going into business or finance, or going on to grad- 
uate work in economics or business administration. Several of the 



52 Haverford College 

advanced courses are designed to be of special value to men planning 
to enter the foreign service or other fields of government work, or 
going into journalism or law. A number of the courses acquaint the 
student with significant source material and with research methods 
in economics, and give practice in the preparation of analyses and 
reports. 

Men majoring in Economics should take supporting work in the 
fields of Government, History, and Sociology, and are encouraged to 
take Introduction to Statistics, offered by the Department of Mathe- 
matics. Mathematics 1 is a prerequisite to Statistics. 

Economics 1 is elective for Sophomores and is a prerequisite to all 
other courses in Economics. It may be taken by Freshmen on the 
recommendation of the Dean, and by Juniors and Seniors with the 
permission of the professor in charge. 

Major Retpiirements 

Economics 1, 3a, 9a, 13a, and three other half-year courses in Economics. 
Mathematics 13b (Introduction to Statistics) may be considered as one such half- 
year course. 

Sociology la, and three other half-year courses in supporting fields, as approved 
by the professors concerned. 

Selected readings on the history of economic thought and on current economic 
problems. 

A seven-hour comprehensive examination covering a review of the Major courses 
and the readings. A part of the comprehensive examination may be oral. 

1. Elementary Economics — Mr. Teaf. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the main features of 
modern economic life, and to develop an understanding of the principles under- 
lying economic relationships. Emphasis is laid on the application of these prin- 
ciples to present-day problems. 

3a. Money and Banking — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of the history and principles of money, credit, and banking, with par- 
ticular reference to American conditions. Such problems as monetary standards, 
price movements and their effects, foreign exchange, commercial banking, and 
central banking and the Federal Reserve System are considered. 

[Not offered in 1945-46; to be offered in 1946-47.] 

ib. International Trade and Finance — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of foreign trade and exchange, international payments and trade prob- 
lems connected therewith, money and banking in their international aspects, and 
international indebtedness. 

[Not offered in 1945^6.] 

5a. Industry and Society — Mr. Watson. 

(See Sociology 5a.) 

6b. Labor Policies and Business Management — Mr. Watson. 
(See Sociology 6b.) 

8b. Government Finance — Mr. Herndon. 
(See Government 8b.) 



Courses in Economics 53 

9a or 9b. Accounting — Mr. Teaf. 

The balance sheet and statement of profit and loss, the classification of accounts, 
the theory of debit and credit, the books of original entry and of record, opening 
and dosing the books, corporation accounts, reserves, etc. Discussion is accom- 
panied by practice problems. This course is intended to provide an understanding 
of accounting sufiBcient for students going into the professions as well as a founda- 
tion for advanced accounting courses for those who will go into business. 

10b. The Corporation — MR. Teaf. 

Economic functions and legal responsibilities of the corporation and its mem- 
bers; fixed capital, and the analysis of financial statements; policies involving 
surplus, reserves, dividends, etc.; expansion, combination, and reorganization. 
Social problems created by the growth of corporations are given special attention. 
Prerequisite, Economics 9a. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

11a. Government and Business — Mr. Teaf. 

A study of the historical development, economic basis, and the present problems 
of the regulation of business organization and policies by government. Special 
attention is given to such topics as the trust movement, anti-trust legislation, the 
Federal Trade Commission, competitive practices, cartels and trade associations. 

(Also called Government 11a.) 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

13a. National Income and Investment — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of the meaning of national income and the methods of measuring it; 
its distribution in the United States; the economic effects of the allocation of 
national income as between consumption, investment, and hoarding; the signifi- 
cance of investment in the modern economy; the effects of governmental policy 
upon income distribution. 

Enrollment limited. A seminar course intended primarily for economics Majors, 
but also open to qualified students from other departments. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

14b. Seminar in Economic Problems — Mr. Fetter. 

This seminar will deal with an economic problem of current importance, with 
emphasis on the relation between economic analysis and the formulation of 
public policy. 

The subject of the course may shift from year to year, or the same topic may be 
continued for several years, depending on developments in world economic affairs. 
In case of a shift in the subject matter of the course, it may be repeated for credit. 

[Not offered in 1945^6.] 

15a, 16b. Seminar — Mr. Fetter and Mr. Teaf. 

Readings, reports, and conferences on selected topics, to meet the individual 
needs of graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll for this 
course after specific arrangement with the chairman of the Department. 

Economics 17a. Readings in Foreign Economics — Mr. Fetter. 

This course is to train men in the reading of economic literature in foreign 
languages, and to familiarize them with current economic publications and with 
the principal economic journals and sources of commercial and statistical infor- 
mation appearing in foreign languages. Intended primarily for economics Majors, 
but qualified men in other fields will be admitted. 

The course will be given as demand warrants, with reading in French, German, 
or Spanish to meet the needs of individual students. Men admitted to the course 
ordinarily must have the equivalent of two years of college study in the language 
to be covered, but by special permission a man with only one year may be admitted. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 



ENGINEERING 

The engineering courses are designed to give a thorough training 
in fundamental engineering principles and, as far as practicable, to 
illustrate the application of these principles to their associated 
industries. 

Students not intending to enter the highly specialized fields of 
design and research will find the Haverford courses ample for their 
needs. Graduates of Haverford who have majored in engineering 
are admitted to the student-engineers' courses of the leading indus- 
trial companies on equal terms with graduates of the larger engineer- 
ing colleges. Those who desire more specialized training before 
entering the active work of the profession are granted substantial 
credit toward advanced standing in technical institutions or are 
admitted to their graduate schools. 

The engineering courses are conducted in the Hilles Laboratory 
of Applied Science, a modem building containing classrooms, draw- 
ing rooms; a departmental library; mechanical, electrical, and elec- 
tronics laboratories. 

Exceptional facilities for observing the practical side of the work 
are offered by the many manufacturing companies in and near Phila- 
delphia, and frequent inspection trips are made. 

A typical selection of courses for those majoring in engineering 
is outlined on page 31. 

The specific courses offered by the Department are described below; 
but, in addition, others may be arranged to cover special needs. 
Application for admission to such courses should be made to the 
professor in charge. Engineering I5a, 14b, and 23a, 24b may be 
counted as courses in Physics for the purpose of satisfying any cur- 
riculum requirements. 

Major Requirements 

Engineering la, 2b, 7a, 8b. 13a, 14b, 15a, 16b. 

Chemistry la or its equivalent. Mathematics 2, Physics 2, and two additional 
half-year courses from Engineering, Mathematics, Physics, or Chemistry. 
An active interest in current professional work. 
Engineering seminar and comprehensive examination. 

la. Principles of Engineering Drawing and Shop Methods — Mr. Hetzel, 
Mr. Holmes, and Mr. Rantz. 

Lettering, conventions, projection, perspective, sketching, detail and assembly 
drawings, checking, and blue printing. Text: French, Engineering Draxuing, and 
French and McCully, Engineering Drawing Sheets. Woodworking, pattern and 
foundry work in shop. Inspection trips. A fee of $11.00 per semester is charged. 

2b. Engineering Drawing, Orientation, Surveying, and Shop Methods — 

Mr. Holmes, Mr. HT-tzel, and Mr. Rantz. 

Additional work on detail and assembly drawings for a complete machine. 
Exercises in machine-tool work, in plane sui-veying, and in the mechanical labora- 

54 



Courses in Engineering 55 

tory. Lectures will be arranged by outside specialists in the various branches of 
engineering for orientation purposes. Attendance at these lectures will be required. 
Discussions and reports. Inspection trips. A fee of $11.00 per semester is charged. 

5a. Shop Methods — Mr. Rantz. 

Machine-tool work on the lathe, planer, milling machine, shaper, etc. Reference 
reading and reports on modem production methods, costs and time studies. A fee 
of $12.50 per semester is charged. 

7a. Kinematics of Machines — Mr. Hetzel. 

Velocity and acceleration analysis of mechanisms; cams, belts and chains, gears, 
etc. Occasional inspection trips. Text: Keown and Faires, Mechanism, and 
Headley, Problems in Kinematics. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

8b. Analytical Mechanics — Mr. Hetzel. 

A study of forces and moments of forces; determination of forces in trusses and 
cranes; centroids and center of gravity; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; trans- 
lation and rotation of bodies; work, power, and energy; impulse and momentum; 
balancing and moments of inertia. Prerequisite or parallel course, Mathematics 2. 
No fee. 

10b. Materials of Engineering — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of the production and engineering properties of metals, their alloys, and 
the more important non-metallic materials. Laboratory exercises on the testing 
machine, heat treatment, microscopic study of metals, hardness testing, etc. Text: 
Mills, Materials of Construction. Inspection trips. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. 

11a. Fluid Mechanics — Mr. Holmes. 

The properties of fluids; statics and dynamics of compressible and incompressible 
fluids; accelerated liquids in relative equilibrium; Reynolds' number; Bernoulli's 
theorem; flow of fluids in pipes, orifices, and nozzles; flow with a free surface in 
channels and weirs; impulse and momentum in fluids; resistance of immersed 
and floating bodies; cavitation and dynamic similitude. A fee of $5.00 per semester 
is charged. 

12b. Thermodynamics — MR. Holmes. 

Energy, gas laws, vapors, mixtures of gases and vapors, flow of fluids, theoretical 
and actual thermodynamic cycles for power and refrigeration. No fee. 

13a. Elements of Applied Electricity. 

This course, while fundamental to the more advanced electrical courses, is 
adapted to the needs of those students desiring practical experience with the 
common applications of electricity. It includes a study of circuits, d.c. and a.c. 
generators and motors, lamps, heaters, etc. The instruction is carried on by text- 
book and laboratory work. Text: Cook, Elements of Electrical Engineering. A fee 
of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

14b. Alternating Current Theory and Practice. 

A continuation of course 13a, with a more detailed study of alternating currents 
including power, electronics, and communication apparatus. A fee of $7.50 per 
semester is charged. 

15a. Heat Engineering — Four hours. Mr. Holmes. 

This course includes a study of steam and gas engines, turbines, condensers, 
air-compressors, steam boilers, power-plant economies, and cost of power. Text: 
Severns and Degler, Steam, Air and Gas Power. 

One laboratory period a week is required. The laboratory exercises parallel the 
classroom work and include boiler and engine testing, fuel tests, gas analysis, 
calibration of instruments, etc. Comprehensive reports for each test are required. 
Inspection trip. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 



56 Haverford College 

16b. Strength of Materials — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of stress and strain; of beams and columns; of shafting; of girders, 
trusses, combined stresses, etc. A series of tests on the screw -testing machine is 
made by each student. Text: Laurson and Cox, Mechanics of Materials. Inspection 
trips. Prerequisite, Engineering 8b. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

17a. Electronics — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures, problems, and laboratory work covering fundamental principles, vac- 
uum and gas tubes, photo-electric devices, etc. 

(See Physics 15a.) 

18b. Internal Combustion Engines — Mr. Hetzel. 

A course on gasoline and Diesel engines, with particular attention to thermo- 
dynamics and the subject of fuels. Special topics may be arranged according to 
the interests of the group. Lectures, assigned reading, problems, laboratory experi- 
ments, inspection trips. No fixed fee. 

21a. Mechanical Laboratory — Mr. Holmes and Mr. Hetzel. 

Operation, testing, and theory of steam, gas, hydraulic, and air machinery. 
Two periods of experimental work per week with reports on each test. If taken 
as 21a, the course may be continued through the second half-year by arrangement. 
Assigned reading and comprehensive reports. Prerequisite, Engineering 15a. A fee 
of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

23a. Electrical Circuits and Measurements — Mr. Benham. 

Circuit theory and laboratory work covering magnetic, inductive, capacitive, and 
polyphase circuits; transients, non-sinusoidal voltages and currents. Text: Wein- 
bach. Alternating Current Circuits. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

24b. Electrical Theory and Experimentation — Mr. Benham. 

Special topics in electronics, communications, and power. This course will be 
suited to the needs of a limited number of students electing it. Prerequisite, 
Engineering 14 b or 17a. 

25a, 26b. Special Projects in Engineering. 

Students majoring in Engineering are encouraged to do individual work in spe- 
cial fields of investigation. Each student devotes the time equivalent to one or two 
semester courses in comprehensive reading or experimental work and reports on 
some particular topic. No fixed fee. 

ENGUSH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The Department believes it essential to insure that all undergrad- 
uates should be able to use the English language efficiently in their 
college courses, regardless of the nature of those courses. Freshmen, 
therefore, are required to prove their ability in this respect. 

It believes, further, that the departmental curriculum must provide 
a general cultural background for those students whose interests are 
chiefly scientific or technical. It offers, therefore, intermediate courses 
in English and American literature. 

It believes, finally, that courses must be provided for students who 
intend to do graduate work in literature or related fields. It offers, 
therefore, advanced courses designed both in content and method to 
train students with serious special interests. 

The Department recognizes that these intentions cannot be rigidly 
differentiated, and there is no intention that they should be. Consid- 



Courses in English 57 

erable freedom of selection is possible for the individual student after 
appropriate consultation. 

Major Requirements 

An individual program equal to six courses of two terms each, made up princi- 
pally from the advanced English courses with the approval of the Major Super- 
visor, and stressing the Elizabethan and nineteenth-century literature. 

la. Composition and Methods — Mr. Comfort and Mr. Hoag; Mr. Lester. 
Written composition, public speaking, methods and techniques of college work. 

2b. Types of English Literature — Mr. Sargent. 

Introduction to the study and appreciation of literature through reading and 
analysis of significant works of drama, poetry, fiction, and expository prose. 

4b. Intermediate Composition — Mr. Hoag. 

Practice in expository writing. 

8b. The English Bible— Mr. Fught. 

(See Biblical Literature 8b.) 

lib. Shakespeare — Mr. Sargent. 

Reading and study of twelve plays, with emphasis on features of general and 
popular interest. Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

12a. Contemporary Drama — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of the techniques and practice of the modern drama, as illustrated in 
the works of Ibsen and the best modern dramatists of England and America. Not 
restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

14a. American Literature to the Civil War — Mr. Spaeth. 
American writers from Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln. 

14b. American Literature from the Civil War to the Twentieth Century — 

Mr. Spaeth. 
American writers from Walt Whitman to Henry Adams. 

21b. The Nineteenth-Century Novel in England — Mr. Lester. 

The study of the novel as a literary form with special consideration of twelve 
principal novelists from Austen to Henry James. 

22b. Nineteenth-Century Poets — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of six poets: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Keats, and 
Tennyson. Lectures and classroom discussions. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

23a. Elizabethan Literature — Mr. Sargent. 

Chief writers of the English Renaissance, omitting Shakespeare. Prerequisite, 
English lib. 

26b. Eighteenth-Century Literature — Mr. Snyder. 

The age of Johnson. 
[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

27a. Greek Literature in English — Mr. Post. 

(See Greek 27a.) 

28b. Creative Writing — Mr. Sargent. 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussion, and personal conferences. Juniors and 
Seniors. 



58 Haverford College 

30b. Chaucer — Mr. Sargent, 

Brief account of Middle English; main emphasis upon literary qualities of 
Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. 

32b. British and American Literature of the Twentieth Century — Mr. 

Sargent. 

Fiction and verse by selected writers from Conrad and Crane to Auden and 
Hemingway. Prerequisite, two term courses in English beyond the Freshman year. 

36b. Latin Literature in English — Mr. Lockwood. 
(See Latin 36b.) 

42b. Special Topics in Poetry — Mr. Snyder. 

Important treatises on poetics from Aristotle to Whitman. An intensive study 
of Browning's poems. Required of all English Majors. Apply in advance. Limited 
to twelve. 

[Not offered in 1945^6.] 

43a. Methods of Literary Scholarship — Mr. Sargent. 

An introduction to the aims, problems, and methods of research in English 
literature by means of an advanced study of Shakespeare. Bi-weekly reports and 
one piece of original investigation. Required of all English Majors. Apply in 
advance. Limited to twelve. 

44. Special Projects in English — Mr. Sargent. 

Individual projects in reading, investigation, or creative writing. Weekly con- 
ferences with instructor. Projects must be mapped out and approved before 
permission is given to elect this course. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. May 
be carried more than one term for credit. 

Courses la, 12a, and 44 were offered in the summer of 1945. 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

1. Geography and Geology — Mr. Dunn. 

A discussion of the general principles of these sciences, with special reference to 
North America, and to the Philadelphia region. Practical work in mineralogy, 
physiography, and stratigraphy is required. Three lectures a week (one omitted 
at option of instructor) . Open to Juniors and Seniors without prerequisite. 

GERMAN 

German 1, 2, 3, and 9a [lOb] are primarily language courses. The 
remaining courses are devoted primarily to the history of German 
literature or to the intensive study of special periods or authors. 
The courses in literature are open to Juniors and Seniors, and to 
especially well qualified Sophomores. 

Opportunity is given to students who complete German 1 or Ger- 
man 2 with distinction to advance rapidly into higher courses by 
passing a special examination on a prescribed program of collateral 
reading. 

Major Reqpiirements 

German 3, 5a, 6b, 9a [10b], 11a, 12b, 13a, 14b, I5a. 

Supporting courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Kelly. 

A comprehensive examination covering: 1. The German language; 2. History 
of the German language; 3. German literature; 4. German history, 1517-1914; and 
5. A special period, literary movement, or author. 



Courses in German 59 

1. Elementary German — Five hours (three hours credit) . Mr. Keixy and Mr. 
Pfund. 

Grammar, conversation, and the reading of simple texts. 

2. Intermediate German — Four hours (three hours credit). Mr. Kelly and 
Mr. Pfund. 

Texts of moderate difficulty are read both in class and as outside work. One hour 
a week is devoted to composition. German is the language of the classroom. 
Scientific German may be chosen as collateral reading. 

In the first semester of 1945-46 German 2b is offered for those who took 
German 2a in the summer session, and German 2a is offered for those who wish 
to begin at the usual time. 

3. Advanced German — Mr. Pfund. 

Reading of standard works of German literature. Composition and Conversa- 
tion. The collateral reading may be done in literary or scientific German. 
Prerequisite, German 2 or the equivalent in school. 

5a. The Beginnings of Modern German Literature — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of Lessing and the early works of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be 
arranged, first half-year. Prerequisite, German 3. 

6b. The Classical Period of German Literature — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the mature works of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be arranged, 
second half-year. Prerequisite, German 5a. 

9a or 10b. Advanced Composition and Conversation — Mr. Pfund. 
Prerequisite, German 3 or the equivalent. 

11a. History of German Literature from its Origins to the Seventeenth 
Century — Mr. Pfund. 

Lectures in German, with collateral reading in modern German translation. 
Discussions. Written and oral reports. Prerequisite, German 3. 

12b. History of German Literature from the Seventeenth Century to the 
Present — Mr. Pfund. 

A survey course with lectures in German. Collateral reading. Discussions. 

Written and oral reports. Prerequisite, German 3. 

13a. German Romanticism — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the Romantic movement in Germany and its relations to similar 
movements in England and France. Prerequisite, German 3. 

14b. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century — Mr. Kelly. 

15a. Faust — Mr. Pfund. 

An intensive study of Goethe's Faust in the original. Consideration is given to 
kindred works in European literature. 

17a. The Life and Works of Richard Wagner — Mr. Kelly. 

18b. German Lyric Poetry — Mr. Pfund, 

German 2a was offered in the summer of 1945. 

GOVERNMENT 

Courses in Government are designed with three purposes: to pro- 
vide an understanding of the philosophy behind and the evolution 
of political ideas; to study contemporary forms and processes of local, 
state, national, and international government; to provide training 
for students planning to enter public service, journalism, or the law. 



60 Haverford College 

Major Requirements 

Government 3a, 4b, 17a, and 18b. 

Any four other courses of one term each in Government. 
Any four other courses of one term each in any of the social sciences. 
A three-hour examination in political philosophy. 

A four-hour examination in other courses taken in the Department of Govern- 
ment. 

2b. Government and Economic Resources — Mr. Chandler. 

A study of the basic geographical factors which have influenced political policies, 
governmental institutions, and economic adjustments. 

Open to all students. 

3a. American Federal Government — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the origin and structure of the American Federal governmental 
system. 

This course is intended primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores, and is a pre- 
requisite for advanced courses in this Department. 

4b. American Federal Administration — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the administrative methods, problems, and philosophies of the 
American Federal Government: a continuation of Government 3a. 

Open only to students who have completed three terms. 

5a. Contemporary Legislation — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the technique of legislation and an analysis of certain selected bills 
currently before Congress. 

6b. American Constitutional Law — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the principles of constitutional interpretation and of the leading 
decisions of the Supreme Court. This course also includes readings in selected 
works on constitutional development and lectures on the essentials of jurisprudence. 

Open only to students who have completed one course in Government or 
American History. 

8b. Government Finance — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the general principles of public revenues, public expenditures, public 
indebtedness, fiscal administration, and of the principles of equity in the distri- 
bution of tax burdens. Prerequisite, Government 3a unless Economics 1 has been 
passed or is being taken concurrently. 

(Also called Economics 8b.) 

10b. State and Local Government — Mr. Herndon, 

A study of the structure and administration of state and local government, with 
special reference to: Pennsylvania; Montgomery, Delaware, and Philadelphia 
Counties; Haverford and Lower Merion Townships. 

1 la. Government and Business — Mr. Teaf. 

(See Economics 11a.) 

12b. United States Relations with Russia and the Far East — Mr. Chandler. 

Open to students who have Junior or Senior standing. 

13a. American Foreign Policy — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the basic foreign policies which have evolved in the experience of the 
United States, and the adaptations which have been found necessary in recent 
times. 

14a. International Organization — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the constitutional bases of the United Nations Organization, the 
League of Nations, the World Court, and the other principal international agen- 
cies of the years since 1919. 



Courses in Greek 61 

14b. United States Relations with Latin America — Mr. Chandler. 
Open to students who have Junior or Senior standing. 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought — Messrs. Chandler, Foss. 
Herndon, Post, and Steere. 

(See Philosophy 17a, 18b.) 

Students interested in taking certain courses in Politics ofiEered by the Faculty 
of Bryn Mawr College should consult Mr. Herndon. 

GREEK 

Instruction in Greek aims to familiarize the student with the 
thought and culture of ancient Greece. Greek language is important 
for its relations to other European languages and for its eflEect on 
modern scientific terminology, particularly in medicine. 

Greek literature and thought continue to be an important force 
in the modern world; in connection with their study the recurring 
principles of behavior, statecraft, philosophy, and drama are stressed. 

Major Requirements 

Greek 3a, 4b, and four half-year courses from Greek 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 11a, 12b, 
27a, and History 13a. 

Three additional courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Post. 

If Greek 3a, 4b is not taken in college, an additional half-course will be required. 

A comprehensive examination on Greek language and literature, Greek history, 
and Greek civilization. 

1. Elementary Creek — Mr. Post. 

Thorough study of the elements of the language followed by the reading of 
simple Attic prose. This course should be taken in the Freshman year, if possible. 

2. Intermediate Greek — Mr. Post. 

A rapid reading course in such authors as Homer, Herodotus, and Euripides. 

3a, 4b. Advanced Intermediate Greek — Mr. Post, 
Selections from Plato, Menander, Aristophanes, and the tragedians are read. 

7a, 8b. Advanced Greek — Mr. Post. 

The instructor will arrange with students electing this course a systematic 
study of special subjects in Greek philosophy, history, or literature in connection 
with the reading of Greek authors. 

9a, 10b. Advanced Greek — Mr. Post. 

A continuation of the work done in Greek 7a, 8b. 

11a, 12b. Advanced Greek Prose Composition — Mr. Post. 

This course should be taken by all candidates for final honors in Greek. 

27a. Creek Literature in English — Mr. Post. 

Lectures on Greek literature. Reading of Greek poetry, drama, and literary 
criticism in translation. Essays and discussions. No knowledge of Greek is required 
in this course, but a general acquaintance with English literature is essential. 

(Also called English 27a.) 



62 Haverford College 

fflSTORY 

The study of History provides a background against which many 
current problems may be viewed to advantage, and it helps to develop 
critical standards for the evaluation of evidence. It is further impor- 
tant as a foundation for professional studies in fields such as public 
administration, journalism, and the law. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses (or three full-year courses and two half-year courses) in 
History, other than History 1. 

Two full-year courses or their equivalent in related departments. 

Four review examinations of three hours each. 

1. English History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of political, constitutional, economic, and social history, intended as 
an introductory course. 

2. Foundations of the United States, 1492-1865 — Mr. Drake. 

Lectures, reading, and discussion in American colonial and early national his- 
tory. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

3. National Development of the United States, 1865 to the Present — Mr. 

Drake. 

A study of institutional growth, with the larger social and political issues of 
the present considered in their historical setting. A lecture, reading, and discus- 
sion course. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

4. English Constitutional History — Mr. Lunt. 

A study of the formation and growth of English institutions, designed to be 
useful particularly to those who are interested in government and law. Elective 
for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

5. Mediaeval History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from the time of the barbarian invasions to 
about 1500. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

6. Modem European History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from about 1500 to the present. Elective for 
undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

7a. Ancient History of the Near East — Mr. Flight. 
Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 
(See Biblical Literature 7a.) 

10b. History of Europe, 1914-1939 — Mr. Lunt. 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

13a. Greek History — Mr. Comfort. 

A survey of Greek history, with frequent reports on the art, archaeology, and 
political institutions of Greece. A knowledge of Greek is not required. 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

14b. Roman History — Mr. Comfort. 

A survey of Roman history to the time of Constantine. Frequent class reports 
on special topics. A knowledge of Latin is not required. 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 



63 
fflSTORY OF ART 

The undergraduate courses in History of Art given at Bryn Mawr 
College are regularly open to Haverford students, who may also 
elect History of Art as their subject of Major Concentration, Haver- 
ford students may likewise do special work at Bryn Mawr for 
Honors in History of Art. 

For description of courses, and for rules and regulations con- 
cerning Major Concentration and Honors work, see the current 
Bryn Mawr College Calendar. Students planning to study at Bryn 
Mawr College should consult the Dean of Haverford College. 

HUMANISTIC STUDIES 

la, 2b — Mr. Post. 

This course is designed to introduce students to the life and literature of the 
Far East, through the use of translations, and to develop their mastery of a major 
field and of expository writing. G. Nye Steiger, A History of the Far East, is recom- 
mended for supplementary reading. Essays, weekly or biweekly, for discussion at 
individual meetings with the instructor. It may be taken as one or two half -courses 
in either half-year by a limited number of students who will be admitted only 
after a personal interview and only if there is still room for them when they apply 
to the instructor. 

LATIN 

The courses in Latin supplement the intensive foundation work 
of the secondary school by means of more extensive reading over a 
wider range of literature, illustrating successive eras of culture from 
the third century B.C. to the sixteenth century A.D. By inculcating 
a fuller knowledge of the Latin language as a tool, the same courses 
open the door to a better command of English, Romance languages, 
philosophy, and history. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses in Latin (not including 1, 3, 5a, and 6b) . 

Two additional full-year courses in other departments, arranged in conference 
between the student and the professors in charge. 

A comprehensive written examination on Roman history, literature, and civiliza- 
tion, and the classical heritage of medieval and modern times. Candidates for 
honors must also take an oral examination. 

1. Elementary Latin — Mr. Comfort. 

Grammar, reading, composition. Prepares students for Latin 3. 

3. Cicero — Mr. Comfort. 

Orations of Cicero and readings in other prose authors. 

5a, 6b. Vergil — Mr. Comfort. 

Six books of Vergil's Aeneid and readings in other Roman poets. 

7. Survey of Classical Roman Literature — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of classical authors from Plautus to Suetonius. Emphasis will 
be laid on literary history and appreciation. Text: Lockwood, A Survey of Classical 
Roman Literature. 



64 Haverford College 

9a, 10b. Readings in Latin Literature — Mr. Lockwood and Mr. Comfort. 
Individual work. Each student may select a field of writing which is correlated 
with his other college courses (e.g., in philosophy, history, Romance languages, or 
English literature) or he may pursue more intensive work in one of the periods or 
one of the literary types surveyed in Latin 7 or 11. 

11. Survey of Medieval Latin Literature — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of selections from the post-classical. Christian, and medieval 
Latin writers. Study of the phases of European civilization represented in Latin 
literature. 

13a or 14b. Advanced Prose Composition — Mr. Lockwood. 

Either 13a or 14b is required of candidates for final honors. 

17. Roman Law — Mr. Lockwood. 

Reading of selections from the Institutes, the Digest, and other texts and sources 
of Roman Law. 

36b. Latin Literature in English — Mr. Lockwood. 

Lectures on Latin literature and civilization. Reading of Roman prose and 
verse, including some of the Christian writers. No knowledge of Latin is required. 

(Also called English 36b.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Freshman Mathematics is designed to provide that background of 
trigonometry, algebra, and analytic geometry which is necessary for 
any serious student of the physical or social sciences and which is 
culturally desirable for many others. 

The more advanced courses are arranged to meet the needs of two 
groups in addition to those majoring in Mathematics: 

(1) Students of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering, who should 
take Mathematics 2 and, in many cases. Mathematics 3 and Mathe- 
matics 11a. 

(2) Students, such as economists and biologists, who need statis- 
tics in their major fields and who should take Mathematics 13a 
and 14b. 

The Department Major prepares for teaching in preparatory 
schools, for graduate study leading to college teaching, and for sta- 
tistical and actuarial work. 

Major Requirements 

Mathematics 1, 2, 3, 7a, 8a, 9b, 10b, 11a, and 16b. 

Prescribed parallel reading on the history and general principles of mathematics. 

Three written comprehensive examinations, each three hours in length. An oral 
examination will be required of candidates for final honors. 

It is recommended that facility in reading French and German be acquired as 
early in the college course as possible. 

1. Freshman Mathematics — Four hours. Mr. Aixendoerfer and Mr. Holmes. 

First semester — Plane Trigonometry, including logarithms and the solution of 

triangles. Topics in College Algebra, including complex numbers, combinations 

and permutations, determinants, and the elements of the theory of equations. 



Courses in Mathematics 65 

Second semester — Analytic Geometry. General methods in the plane with appli- 
cations to conic sections and other curves. Introduction to the geometry of three 
dimensions. 

Freshmen with superior preparation are invited to discuss with the Department 
the possibility of their taking Mathematics 7a, 9b, or in rare cases Mathematics 2, 
in place of Mathematics 1. 

2. Calculus — Mr. Oakley. 

Differential and Integral Calculus, with applications. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 1. Specially well qualified Freshmen may elect this course with the per- 
mission of the Department. 

3. Advanced Calculus and Differential Equations — Mr. Oakley. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

7a. Theory of Equations — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Advanced theory of equations, determinants, matrices. Open to specially well 
qualified Freshmen in place of Mathematics la. Otherwise, prerequisite. Mathe- 
matics la. 

8a. Advanced Algebra — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Introduction to number theory and modern abstract algebra. Prerequisites, 
Mathematics 2, 7a. 

[Offered on request to Majors only.] 

9b. Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Review of plane analytic geometry followed by solid analytic geometry. Open 
to Freshmen with a knowledge of analytic geometry in place of Mathematics lb. 
Otherwise, prerequisite. Mathematics lb. 

10b. Introduction to Higher Geometry — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Projective geometry from the synthetic and the analytic points of view. Klein's 
theory of general geometries, including the standard non-Euclidean cases. Pre- 
requisites, Mathematics 2, 9b. 

[Offered on request to Majors only.] 

11a. Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Series — Mr. Oakley. 

Problem course, with many applications to Chemistry, Engineering, and Physics. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 3. 

13b. Introduction to Statistics — Mr. Oakley. 

Tabular and graphic methods, frequency distribution, averages, measures of 
central tendency, dispersion and skewness, correlation, tests of significance. Lectures 
and laboratory. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

14a. Advanced Statistics, Elementary Probabilities, and Finite Differences — 

Mr. Oakley. 

This course is designed for students who are interested in statistical and actuarial 
work. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 and 13b. 

15a or 16b. Special Topics — Mr. Oakley, Mr. Allendoerfer, and Mr. Green. 

The content of this course may vary from year to year to suit the needs of 
advanced students. May be repeated for credit. 

19a. Mechanics — Mr. Sutton. 
(See Physics 9a.) 
Mathematics 1 and 3a were offered in the summer of 1945. 



66 Haverford College 

MUSIC 

In addition to a considerable collection of musical scores and books 
in the general library, the special equipment of the Music Depart- 
ment consists of a collection of phonograph records, scores, and books 
presented in 1933 by the Carnegie Corporation and amplified by 
yearly accessions to double its original size (ca. 1600 records) , sev- 
eral pianos, and a Hammond organ. 

The Alfred Percival Smith Rooms in the Haverford Union con- 
sist of a larger room for the holding of classes and informal con- 
certs and a small room for study, in which valuable books, scores, 
and records are kept. A special student is in charge of these quar- 
ters. He supervises the playing of records to students and faculty 
and is responsible for the maintenance of the rooms exclusively for 
study purposes. 

The big concerts are held in Roberts Hall, where a concert grand 
Steinway will be available. 

Major Requirements 

Three full-year courses in Music and three full-year (or six half-year) courses 
in related fields such as History of Art; German 17a; English 23a; Physics 12b; 
History 5, 6; or other courses in Music. These courses are to be arranged in 
conference with the professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: 

(1) The History of Music. Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge 
of all styles from the mediaeval chants to the romantic era, as well as a special 
knowledge (acquaintance with sources) of one particular period, preferably 
anterior to 1600 A.D. 

(2) Musical Composition. Candidates will be expected to submit compositions 
involving three and four part writing for voices (in free counterpoint) and 
instrumental scoring for an orchestral ensemble of the classical type. 

1. Foundations of Music — Mr. Swan. 

The initial course in Music begins with the study of the fundamental musical 
senses (scales, intervals, harmony, tonality, etc.) which the student may apply 
in his own practice of composition. Analyses of form are made and the styles 
of various epochs and schools are studied later. Through this study of the 
musical language a perception of the creations of Palestrina, Bach, Mozart, 
Beethoven, etc., is attempted. No technical prerequisites. 

Texts: Morris, Foundations of Practical Harmony and Counterpoint. 

Morris, Contrapuntal Technique of the Sixteenth Century. 

Medtner, The Muse and the Fashion. 

2. The Main Periods of Music History from the Renaissance to the Nine- 
teenth Century — Mr. Swan. 

A more penetrating study of the successive styles in music. Analysis of motets, 
madrigals, concerti, sonatas, and symphonies. 

3. Musical Craftsmanship — Mr. Swan. 

Intended for students who wish to attempt composition on a larger scale: 
a cappella writing in three and four parts, chorale harmonizations, dance forms. 
Prerequisite, Music 1. 



Courses in Music 67 

4. Instrumentation (in combination with the Departments of Physics and Psy- 
chology) — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A study of the orchestral instruments from the point of view of their tone-color 
and tone-production, their idiosyncrasies and limitations, and the effects of combi- 
nation in ensemble. An intimate study of the scores of master works will be made. 
A knowledge of harmony and performance on a musical instrument is prerequisite. 
Text: Forsythe, Orchestration, The Macmillan Co. 

20a. Music History to the End of the Sixteenth Century — Mr. Swan. 

A required course for Music Majors. The study of the available sources from 
the Ars Antiqua to the last Netherlanders. Playing of a cappella scores at the 
piano. Reading of Besseler's Musik des Mittelalters und der Renaissance and 
Ludwig's edition of the works of Machaut. (Knowledge of German very useful.) 

21a. Advanced Musical Composition — Mr. Swan. 
A required course for Music Majors. Includes composition in sonata form. 

22a. Advanced Orchestration (by arrangement with the University of Penn- 
sylvania) . 

PHILOSOPHY 

The courses in Philosophy are intended to help men face and 
examine the great issues of life, to acquaint them with the major 
currents of reflection upon the nature of the universe, and to assist 
them in finding their own way to a more ordered and intelligent 
relation with their world. The work aims to acquaint the students 
with the great classical thinkers and movements of philosophy and 
to put them in touch with present day philosophical and political 
discussions. 

Major Requirements 

Psychology la; Philosophy 5, 7a. 

Four other half-year courses in Philosophy. 

Four half-year courses in related fields to be arranged in conference with the 
professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: three hours on the History of 
Philosophy and three hours on one optional field selected from Topics in Philos- 
ophy since 1800, or Religious Thought, or Psychology. 

3a. Introduction to Philosophy — Mr. Foss. 

An understanding of the nature and function of philosophy and of its relations 
to other fundamental human interests such as science, religion, and art is sought 
through a consideration of representative philosophical problems. Philosophy 3a 
is recommended but not required. 

5. History of Philosophy — Mr. Foss and Mr. Steere. 

A study of the development of philosophy with special reference to Plato, 
Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, and Hegel. 
First-hand acquaintance with selected writings of these philosophers; reports, lec- 
tures, and class discussions. 

7a. Ethics — Mr. Steere. 

A study of (1) conflicts of ethical values involved in contemporary life; (2) 
certain classical ethical devices for resolving those conflicts; (3) the role of the 
individual and of the group in the realization of ethical values. Case material 
drawn from contemporary situations and from literature will be widely used. 
Discussions, lectures, and papers. 



68 Haverford College 

9a. Qassics of Religious Literature — Mr. Steere. 

A study which will include such books as Augustine, Confessions; Bernard of 
Clairvaux, On Consideration; Meister Eckhart, Sermons; Little Flowers of St. 
Francis of Assisi; Thomas k Kempis, Imitation of Christ; Theologica Germanica; 
Theresa of Avila, Autobiography; Francis de Sales, Introduction to the Devout 
Life; Lancelot Andrewes, Preces Privatae; Pascal, Thoughts; Isaac Penington, 
Letters; John Wesley, Journal; John Henry Newman, Apologia; George Tyrrell, 
Autobiography. 

[Not offered in 1945-46; to be offered in 1946-47.] 

10b. Nineteenth Century Thinkers — Mr. Steere. 

Selected writings of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and Bergson. 

lib. Logic — Mr. Foss. 

The principles of valid inference and their application to reasoning in every-day 
life and in the sciences; the syllogism and other types of formal reasoning, the 
nature of proof, the detection of fallacies; introduction to the logic of scientific 
method and to contemporary developments in symbolic logic. 

12b. Philosophy of Science — Mr. Foss. 

This course, designed for students with a general cultural interest as well as for 
those specializing in some one of the sciences, aims at an understanding of the 
nature of scientific knowledge, the logical methods of science, and the structure 
of scientific systems. The course will aid students of the special sciences in appre- 
ciating the manner in which the work of their own field expresses man's scientific 
interest and contributes to the scientific world-view. Basic concepts such as 
induction, causation, probability, measurement, explanation, prediction, and veri- 
fication are analyzed. 

[Not offered in 1945^6.] 

15a. History and Philosophy of Quakerism — Mr. Brinton. 

The Quaker Movement is studied in its relation to other intellectual and 
religious movements of its time, particularly those found in English philosophy. 
The development of the dominant Quaker conceptions is traced to the present 
day and critically examined. The course is designed for non-Friends as well as for 
Friends. Not open to Freshmen. 

[Not to be offered in 1946-47.] 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought — Messrs. Chandler, Foss, 
Herndon, Post, and Steere. 

A seminar course based upon the writings of selected political philosophers from 
Plato to the present day. 

(Also called Government 17a, 18b.) 

21. Philosophical Seminar — Mr. Steere and Mr. Foss. 

Specialized work in some restricted field of philosophic or religious thought is 
undertaken, the precise subject depending upon the needs of the students and the 
general interests of the group. Primarily designed for Seniors majoring in philos- 
ophy and for graduates. 

Philosophy 3a and 21 were offered in the summer of 1945. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The College equipment for outdoor athletics includes: Walton 
Field for football and track and field sports, with a 440-yard oval 
and a 220-yard eight-lane straightway cinder track; the Class of 1888 
and Merion Fields for association (soccer) football, both of which 
are used for baseball in the spring; a skating pond; Cope Field for 



I 



Physical Education 69 

cricket; an athletic field, presented by the Class of 1916; a baseball 
field, presented by the Class of 1922, used also for soccer in the 
fall; and twelve tennis courts, five of which were presented by the 
Class of 1923. 

The Gymnasium floor, sixty by ninety feet, is used for basketball 
and intramural sports. Adjoining the main floor are offices for the 
instructors, the administration of physical examinations, and for 
special student conferences. Adjoining the main hall is a large and 
comfortable lounging room. The basement contains dressing rooms, 
a number of well-ventilated lockers, shower baths, a pool, a wrestling 
room, and storage room for athletic equipment. Through the courtesy 
of the Merion Cricket Club and the Merion Golf Club, facilities for 
squash are available. 

A thorough physical examination with a series of efficiency tests 
is given to each student upon entrance, and another at the end of 
Sophomore year. A Tuberculin Test is given to all Freshmen, fol- 
lowed by an X-ray if necessary, as part of this required examination. 
No student whose physical condition is unsatisfactory will be per- 
mitted to represent the College on any athletic team. 

Course 1 is required for Freshmen; Course 2, for Sophomores; 
Course 3, for Juniors. 

These courses are arranged in accordance with the plan for all- 
year physical training during Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
part-year physical training during Junior year. All accelerated sum- 
mer students must participate in some activity. 

Work on varsity and junior varsity squads may be substituted for 
regular Physical Education requirements. 

1. Physical Education — Three hours. Messrs. Randall, Haddleton, A. Evans, 
DocHERTY, Bramall, and Mullan. 

A course of elementary instruction in athletic games including football, soccer, 
basketball, tennis, golf, track, volley ball, handball, badminton; partly elective. 
Special corrective exercises during the second and third quarters. 

2. Physical Education — Three hours. Messrs. Randall, Haddleton, A. Evans, 
DocHERTY, Bramall, and Mullan. 

A course of advanced instruction in athletic games with emphasis on intra- 
mural sports. 

3. Physical Education — Three hours. Messrs. Randall, Haddleton, A. Evans, 
DocHERTY, Bramall, and Mullan. 

A course, almost entirely elective, involving participation in some organized and 
supervised athletic activity during two of the three athletic seasons of the 
college year. 



70 Haverford College 

PHYSICS 

The introductory courses are Physics 1 and 2. The first of these 
covers elementary physics a little more thoroughly than a secondary 
school course, but the laboratory work is designed especially for 
those who do not expect to specialize in physics. Physics 2 is the 
basic course for further work in physics, chemistry, or engineering. 
It covers the work required in physics for admission to many medi- 
cal schools. With special permission. Physics 1 may be counted as the 
required prerequisite for admission to the more advanced courses. 

Students intending to specialize in physics, chemistry, or medicine 
should also elect Physics 3. 

Physics 1, 2, 3, and 13 are offered annually. Other courses are 
offered according to demand. 

Major Requirements 

Physics 2, 13, and two courses of two terms each from Physics 3, 4b, 5a, 7a, 8b, 
9a, 10b, 11a, 12b, 15a, 16b. 

History of Physics (collateral reading) . 

Mathematics 3, and one or one-and-one-half courses from Chemistry la, 2a or 
2b, 3b; Engineering 13a, 14b, 23a, 24b; Astronomy la, 5a, 6b, or additional 
mathematics or chemistry. 

A comprehensive examination based upon above-mentioned courses. 

1. Introductory Physics — Four hours. Mr. Benham. 

An elementary course designed for students who have had no previous study of 
physics, especially for those who may have no intention of specializing in science. 
Its purpose is to acquaint students with the principles underlying common physical 
phenomena and to illustrate, by lecture table experiments, the solution of prob- 
lems and simple laboratory experiments, and how these principles apply to 
matters of everyday experience. This is a much less exacting course than 
Physics 2. Text: Black, An Introductory Course in College Physics. A fee of 
$7.50 per semester is charged. 

2. General Physics — Four hours. Mr. Sutton. 

Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light are studied with the 
help of problems and lecture demonstrations. A feature of this course is the labora- 
tory work, the chief aim of which is accuracy of observation and measurement. 
Text: Mendenhall, Eve, Keys, and Sutton, College Physics. Prerequisites, Trigo- 
nometry, and Entrance Physics or Physics 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

3. Atomic Physics — Mr. Sutton. 

A large amount of reading supplementary to the lectures is required in the 
library of reference books. Experiments are performed by the class as a whole upon 
such subjects as: atomic and molecular dimensions, weight, and numbers; magni- 
tude of charge and ratio E-4-M for electrolytic ions; e-=-m for cathode rays; prop- 
erties of gaseous ions; measurement of the electronic charge e by Millikan's 
oil-drop method; current and space charge in an electron tube; photo-electric 
effect; radiation and ionization potentials; X-ray spectra; rate of decay of thorium 
emanation, and of the active deposit from radon; counting the alpha particles 
from a specimen of polonium. Prerequisite, Physics 2. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. 

4b. Spectroscopy — Mr. Sutfon. 

Lectures, readings, and experiments on spectroscopy and atomic structure, giving 
emphasis upon the underlying theory and offering acquaintance with the labora- 
tory methods involved. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 



Courses in Physics 71 

5a. Transmission Systems — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures, class discussions, and occasional experiments on the theory and prac- 
tice of networks. The course covers reduction and transformation of complex 
impedance and resistance networks, resonance in electrical circuits, transmission 
lines, filters, coupled circuits, equalizers, and bridge circuits. Text: W. L. Everitt, 
Communication Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. Lab- 
oratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

7a. Electricity and Magnetism — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures and laboratory experiments in precision electrical measurements. This 
course treats such topics as KirchhofE's laws, Gauss's theorem, magnetic circuits, 
potential, capacity, inductance, alternating current, and the laws of the electro- 
magnetic field. Textbook: Page and Adams, Principles of Electricity. Prerequisites, 
Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. Fee, $7.50 per semester. 

8b. Intermediate Radio Communication — Mr. Benham. 

Lecture and laboratory course in high frequency transmission and reception. 
Textbook: Terman, Radio Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathe- 
matics 2, and preferably Physics 7a. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

9a. Mechanics — Mr. Sutton. 

Analytical mechanics treating the statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles 
and rigid bodies. Lectures and problems on the application of calculus and vector 
methods to mechanical systems including a brief treatment of Lagrange's equations 
and the special theory of relativity. Text: Synge and Griffith, Principles of 
Mechanics. Prerequisites: Physics 2 and Mathematics 3 (or Mathematics 3 may 
be taken concurrently) . No fee. 

(Also called Mathematics 19a.) 

10b. Introduction to Mathematical Physics — Mr. Sutton. 

Lectures and problems on selected topics in mathematical physics, such as 
hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory, wave motion, theory of electric 
fields, etc. Textbook: Page, Introduction to Theoretical Physics. This course and 
Physics 9a are complementary courses affording one full year in theoretical physics, 
but a student may elect either half. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 3 
(or Mathematics 3 may be taken concurrently) . No fee. 

11a. Optics and Photography — Mr. Sutton. 

A study of the principles of physical optics with special reference to photography 
followed by a systematic study of the photographic process. Laboratory work 
includes both measurements in optics and photographic dark-room manipulations. 
Text: Mack and Martin, The Photographic Process. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or 2. 
A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

12b. Sound — Second semester. Mr. Benham or Mr. Pepinsky. 

A course of lectures, readings, and class experiments designed to familiarize the 
student with recent developments in acoustics. Study is given to the fundamentals 
of sound wave propagation, modern electrical and mechanical acoustic systems, 
architectural acoustics, supersonics, speech and hearing, and the analysis of musical 
sound. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. Fee, $7.50 per semester. 

13. Physics Seminar — Mr. Sutton and Mr. Benham. 

Advanced students in physics or other fields of science and mathematics are 
encouraged to do individual work in special fields of investigation. Each student 
devotes the time equivalent to a full' course in pursuing comprehensive reading 
and experimental work on some particular topic. Weekly meetings are held 
with the members of the Department to discuss the progress in each field of 
investigation, so that each student becomes familiar with problems other than 
his own. In this course the accomplishment of scholarly work of a nature pre- 
liminary to research work is the basis for awarding credit toward a degree. Fee, 
$10.00 per semester. 



72 Haverford College 

14b. Communications — Mr. Benham. 

An introduction to such subjects as telephone, telegraph, teletype, and facsimile 
(picture transmission) is given. Also, a major part of the work is devoted to learn- 
ing the Continental Morse code. Laboratory periods are spent in practicing receiv- 
ing and sending the code under the guidance of the instructor. Supplementary 
reading and code practice are required. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or high school 
physics. Laboratory fee, $4.00 per semester. 

15a. Electronics — Mr. Benham. 

This course includes material introductory to electron theory, study and appli- 
cation of vacuum-tubes, and problems pertaining to design and analysis of typical 
circuits employing the vacuum-tube. Laboratory experiments are designed to give 
the student experience in the handling of apparatus in which the vacuum-tube is 
used. Prerequisite, Physics 2. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 
(Also called Engineering 17a.) 

16b. Advanced Radio — Mr. Benham. 

This course takes up the design and operation of such apparatus as radio trans- 
mitters, receivers, cathode-ray oscillograph, frequency modulated transmitters, 
television. Laboratory periods are intended to give the student experience in 
handling, receiving, and transmitting equipment. Prerequisite, Physics 15a or 8b. 
Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

Physics la and 8b were offered in the summer of 1945. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Courses in Psychology have for their goal the understanding and 
prediction of human behavior. The elementary course is designed 
especially for the premedical student, but covers the needs also of the 
student of philosophy and the social sciences and those expecting to 
assume executive positions. 

1. Elementary Psychology — Mr, Pepinsky. 

A course of three demonstration lecture periods and one laboratory a week to 
illustrate such topics as the nervous system and level of brain functioning, motiva- 
tion of behavior, likes, ways of learning, remembering, and inventing. Elective for 
undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. Laboratory fee, $5 per 
semester. 

Section 1: First semester only. For students who take Psychology la to meet 
the requirements of a Philosophy Major. 

Section 2: For students who take the full course (both semesters) as a pre- 
requisite to further work in the Psychology Department. 

2b. Advanced Psychology — Mr. Steere. 

A study of the nature and functioning of personality by an examination of 
personality in diflBculties. Both the forms of abnormal behavior and the modern 
theories of psychotherapy will be studied. Lectures, class reports, and occasional 
trips to clinics. Elective for twelve Juniors and Seniors and only by consent of 
instructor. Prerequisite, Psychology 1. 

3. Special Topics in Psychology — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A seminar for special work in some restricted field of psychology for students 
who have had two semesters of Elementary Psychology and Advanced Psychology. 
Open only by permission of the instructor. 



73 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

The preliminary objective of instruction in the Romance Lan- 
guages is the cultivation of fluent and accurate command of the 
contemporary idiom, both written and oral. Exceptional oppor- 
tunities for developing oral facility in French, Spanish, Italian, and 
German are afforded by residence in the Language House. 

Study of the national literatures of France, Spain, and Italy pre- 
supposes more than elementary facility in conversation and com- 
position. Admission to literature courses is therefore contingent 
upon the consent of the instructor, which will not ordinarily be 
granted earlier than the completion of at least French 3 or Spanish 2 
or Italian 1, or their equivalents. Admission of all new students to 
all French and Spanish courses, except French 1 and Spanish 1, is 
contingent upon placement examinations administered by the 
Department prior to the opening of such courses, on a date to be 
announced. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers Major Programs in 
French and in Spanish. 

French 
Major Requirements 

Four full French courses, except French 1 or 2. 

Modern European History. 

Supporting courses selected from the Latin, German, Spanish, Italian, and 
English languages and literatures; History of Art; Philosophy — to be arranged 
in individual conference. 

A written and oral comprehensive examination on the language, literature, and 
history of France. 

1. Elementary French* — Mr. Comfort and Mrs. Comfort. 
Oral and written introduction to the French language. 

2. Intermediate French* — Mr. Wyue. 

Preparation for French 3; for students presenting the equivalent of French 1 
at entrance. 

3. Introduction to French Civilization — Mr. Wylie. 

Geographic, cultural, and historical background of French literature; lectures, 
reading, discussion, written reports, and explication de textes. 

4. Advanced French Conversation and Composition — Mr. Wylie. 
Normal prerequisites are French 3 and a course in French literature, but exemp- 
tion from the latter may be granted to well qualified students interested primarily 
in the language. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

16b. French Literature through the Sixteenth Century — Mr. Wylie. 

Lectures with collateral reading and reports on the history of early French 
literature. 

[Not offered in 1945^6.] 

* These courses meet six hours per week, with corresponding reduction in outside preparation; 
3 hours credit. 



74 Haverford College 

17a. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century — Mr. Wylie. 

Reading, reports, and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

18b. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century — Mr. Wylie. 

Reading, reports, and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

[Not offered in 1945^6.] 

19a. Romanticism and Realism — Mr. Wylie. 

Reading, reports, and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures from 1800 to 1860. 

19b. Modern French Literature — Mr. Wylie. 

From Baudelaire to Aragon. 

Spanish 

Major Requirements 

Four full Spanish courses, except Spanish 1 or 2. 

History of Spain and Spanish America, as a background for literature. 

Supporting courses selected from the Latin, French, Italian, and English 
languages and literatures; History of Art; Philosophy — to be arranged in indi- 
vidual conference. 

Written and oral comprehensive examinations. 

1. Elementary Spanish* — Mr. Asensio and Mrs. Asensio. 

Grammar, with written and oral exercises; reading; thorough drill in con- 
versation. 

2. Intermediate Spanish* — Mr. Asensio. 

Review of grammar, with written and oral exercises; composition, reading, and 
conversation. 

3. Introduction to Hispanic Civilization — Mr. Asensio. 

Geographic, cultural, historical, and economic background of the Iberian 
Peninsula and Latin America, with emphasis on Hispanic contributions to 
civilization; lectures, reading, written and oral reports. 

4. Advanced Spanish — Mr. Asensio. 

Training in idiomatic Spanish; conversation and composition; collateral reading. 

5a. Introduction to Spanish Literature — Mr. Asensio. 

A survey of Spanish literature from the beginnings to the Golden Age: lectures; 
written and oral reports. 

6b. Introduction to Spanish Literature — Mr. Asensio. 

A survey of Spanish literature from the Golden Age to modern times: lectures; 
written and oral reports. 

7a. Introduction to Latin-American Literature — Mr. Asensio. 

A survey of Latin-American literature from the Colonial period to modem 
times: lectures; written and oral reports. 

8b. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age — Mr. Asensio. 

Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calder6n: lectures; written and 
oral reports. 

9a or 10b. Special Topics in Spanish Literature — Mr. Asensio. 

Reading and lectures; written and oral reports. This course may be repeated, 
with change of content, for full credit. 

* These courses meet five hours per week, with corresponding reduction in outside preparation ; 
3 hours credit. 



75 
Italian 

1. Elementary Italian. 

Oral and written introduction to the Italian language. Not open to Freshmen. 
[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

2. Readings in Italian Literature. 

The Divina Commedia and other Italian classics. 
[Not offered in 1945-46.] 

SOCIOLOGY 

The courses in Sociology are designed to prepare students for citi- 
zenship in a democracy. Most, if not all, of our problems are at 
bottom traceable to faulty relationships between people and between 
groups of people. Hence, sociology as the "science of human rela- 
tions" aims to throw light on the relationship of the individual to 
the group; of group to group; and of group to community. 

Sociology, furthermore, analyzes problems of social maladjustment, 
such as crime, poverty, and the breakdown of family life, which call 
for intelligent social action if community life is to be the matrix 
from which good citizenship is born. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Sociology. 

Six other half-year courses or their equivalent, chosen from the following: 
Biology 7, Psychology 1, Psychology 2b, Government 3a, Economics 1, and Mathe- 
matics 13b, in consultation with the Major Supervisor. 

Additional selected readings covering a special field in Sociology. 

A four-hour comprehensive examination covering the field of Sociology and 
related courses. 

A three-hour examination, written or oral or both, covering a special field in 
Sociology chosen by the student. 

For graduate students majoring in Sociology, Mathematics 13b (Introduction 
to Statistics) and Mathematics 14a (Advanced Statistics) may be counted as 
courses in Sociology. 

la. An Introduction to Sociology — Mr. Watson. 

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of society. Its purpose is to 
study (1) those social forces and social processes whereby original nature is trans- 
formed into human nature, and (2) a description of the social organization man 
has evolved and the interaction between it and himself. 

2b. Criminology — Mr. Watson. 

Social origins of crime and criminals; costs to the community and society; appre- 
hension and rehabilitation of offenders; police organization; the courts in opera- 
tion; penology, including the probation and parole systems. Trips to penal 
institutions and the criminal courts will be made. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

4b. Ethnic Relations — Mr. Watson. 

A study of "racial" and cultural factors in American communities. Special 
attention will be paid to the Negro, the American-born Japanese, the American 
Indian, and other minority groups. The particular cultural contributions of 
various minority groups are explored, and methods of resolving conflicts between 
groups are examined. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

5a. Labor Relations — Mr. Watson. 

A study of basic labor problems, such as wages, hours, and unemployment, 
together with an examination of the efforts of unions and the Government to 



76 Haverford College 

find solutions through collective bargaining and labor legislation. Special empha- 
sis is placed on methods of resolving industrial conflict. Prerequisite, Economics J 
and Sociology la. 

(Also called Economics 5a.) 

6b. Management and Industrial Relations — Mr. Watson. 

A study of business administration and organization and the philosophy of 
management, with special reference to the fields of personnel administration and 
industrial relations. The course surveys the movement for "scientific manage- 
ment." It includes an analysis of the nature, objects, and technique of labor 
management, employee representation, and union-management cooperation. Pre- 
requisite, Economics 1 and Sociology la. 

(Also called Economics 6b.) 

7a. Seminar in Social Science Research — Mr. Watson. 

The seminar aims to acquaint the student with the general methods of research 
in the social sciences and their interrelations. It lays a foundation for the prepara- 
tion of M.A. theses and longer term papers involving social science research 
techniques. 

Classes limited to men majoring in one of the social sciences. Prerequisite, 
one two-term course or two one-term courses in any of the social sciences. 

8b. Problems of the Modern Family — Mr. Watson. 

A seminar course on problems of the modern family and education for parent- 
hood. A discussion of husband-wife, parent-child, and family-community rela- 
tionships. The emphasis throughout is on factors making for normal family life 
■and successful adjustment thereto. Restricted to a limited number of upper- 
classmen or graduate students. Apply in advance. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

GRADUATE TRAINING IN RECONSTRUCTION 
AND RELIEF 

The Reconstruction and Relief Course came to an end in 
December, 1945. For full details of the program see the Haverford 
College Catalog for 1944-45, pp. 31 and 87-89. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
THE LIBRARY 

The Haverford College Library, located near the center of the 
campus, illustrates the steady growth of the College in facilities for 
study and research. The original building, constructed in I860, now 
forms the north wing of the Library. To this first structure four 
successive additions have been made. The last two of these, a com- 
modious Stack and a Treasure Room, were dedicated in April, 1941. 
The Mary Newlin Smith Memorial Garden adjoins the south side of 
the Library building. 

The Haverford Library collection now contains about 167,000 
volumes. Over four hundred literary and scientific periodicals are 
taken. Library endowments provide six thousand dollars yearly for 
the purchase of books. The Library is also a depository of govern- 
ment publications. 

With the exception of certain rare books, all volumes in the Library 
are freely accessible to readers. Though designed especially for the 
use of officers and students of the College, the Library affords to others 
the privilege of consulting and, under certain restrictions, of with- 
drawing books. The Library is open on week days from 8:00 a.m. 
to 10:00 P.M., and on Sundays from 1:30 to 10:00 p.m. Special hours 
are arranged for vacation periods. 

The Gummere-Morley Memorial Reading Room, decorated and 
equipped by the Class of 1892, provides a special reading and brows- 
ing room for Haverford students. 

Rare books and special collections are kept in the Treasure Room, 
where both permanent and temporary exhibitions are held. The 
Treasure Room is open from 9 to 5 (Saturdays, 9 to 12) . 

Special Collections. The Quaker collection, containing both books 
and manuscripts, is probably the most complete in America. It forms 
a central repository for Friends' literature in this country, and makes 
Haverford a prime source for the study of the Society of Friends. 

The William H. Jenks collection of Friends' tracts, mostly of the 
seventeenth century, numbers about fifteen hundred separately 
bound titles. 

The Rufus M. Jones collection on Mysticism contains almost a 
thousand books and pamphlets from the fifteenth century to the 
present day. 

77 



78 Haverford College 

The Tobias collection of the writings of Rufus M. Jones is prac- 
tically complete. It consists of 168 separate volumes and 16 boxes 
of pamphlets and extracts. 

The Charles Roberts autograph collection contains more than 
20,000 items, embracing not only autograph letters of authors, states- 
men, scientists, ecclesiastics, monarchs, and others, but also several 
series of valuable papers on religious and political history. 

The Christopher Morley collection of autograph letters comprises 
about 200 letters and memoranda selected by Mr. Morley from his 
correspondence files. Over 100 authors are represented. 

The Harris collection of ancient and oriental manuscripts con- 
tains over sixty Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopian 
rolls and codices collected by J. Rendel Harris. 

Cooperative Services. Haverford maintains a cooperative arrange- 
ment with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore whereby the facilities of the 
libraries of all three colleges are open to the faculty and students of 
each of the colleges. 

The Philadelphia Bibliographical Center and Union Library 
Catalog, the largest cooperative catalog in America, enables users 
of the Haverford Library to locate books in over one hundred and 
fifty libraries of the Philadelphia region. The Haverford Library is 
also a member of The Philadelphia Metropolitan Library Council. 

The Library Associates is an organization of graduates and friends 
of the College, devoted to increasing the usefulness of the Library. 
It serves to bring the facilities of the Library to a wider notice and 
to make them available to the whole Haverford community; to 
encourage the making of gifts to the Library; and to aid in the use 
of the Library for exhibition purposes. Enquiries should be ad- 
dressed to The Librarian, Haverford College. 

ART COLLECTION 

The Haverford Art Collection, including paintings and drawings 
by Pintorrichio, Whistler, Inness, Sargent, and Turner, is displayed 
in the Library, 

LECTURES 

The Haverford Library Lectures and The Shipley Lectures, both 
endowed lectureships, provide annual speakers. The endowment for 
the former, a gift from the estate of Mary Farnum Brown, is avail- 
able "for an annual course or series of lectures before the Senior Class 
of the College, and other students, on the Bible, its history and litera- 
ture, and as a way may open for it, upon its doctrine and its teaching." 



Lectures, Etc. 79 

The fund for the latter was presented by Samuel R. Shipley, in mem- 
ory of his father, Thomas Shipley. The income from the Shipley 
fund is used "for lectures on English literature." 

Other lectures sponsored by departments in the College, especially 
that of Government, are offered at various times throughout the 
year. Most of these are open to the public. 

THE BUCKY FOUNDATION 

The Bucky Foundation, which has as its goal the promotion of a 
spiritually grounded political and economic order, and the training 
of responsible citizens for such an order, maintains its office in the 
Haverford Union. It has sponsored the Constructive Citizenship 
program, in cooperation with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore Colleges, 
which has provided training in the U. S. Employment Service for 
students of Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Swarthmore. 

THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The Morris Infirmary, presented by John T. Morris, '67, contains 
ten beds, a surgical room, an isolation ward for contagious diseases, 
its own kitchen, and accommodations for a physician and a nurse. 
Every provision has been made for medical and surgical treatment 
of all cases among students during the college year. The danger of 
infection through illness in the college dormitories is thus minimized. 

No charge is made for dispensary treatments, for the services of 
the college physician and the nurse, or for residence in the infirmary 
not exceeding one week in each case of illness. Any additional medi- 
cal or surgical service, including special examinations which cannot 
be made in the Infirmary, will be at the expense of the student. 
For residence in the Infirmary beyond the limit of one week the 
charge is |5 a day. 

Dr. Herbert W. Taylor is the physician in charge. Miss Mabel S. 
Beard is the resident nurse. 

HEALTH PROGRAM 

Under the Health Program at Haverford College the following 
services are available without additional charge: 

Physical examination on entrance. 

Unlimited ambulatory dispensary care at specified hours, with 
emergency dispensary care at any time by the College Physician and 
the College Nurse. 

Infirmary care at no extra cost for a period not to exceed 7 days 
in any single college year. After 7 days a charge of $5 per day will 



80 Haverford College 

be made. This charge will include the continued service of the 
College Physician and the College Nurse. 

Routine laboratory examinations. 

Ordinary X-ray photos necessary for diagnosis in connection with 
injuries. This item does not include X-ray examination for sub- 
acute conditions, such as those of the sinuses, gastro-intestinal tract, 
the lungs, etc. 

Minor surgical treatment as indicated for acute infection, simple 
fractures, dislocations, etc. 

The Health Service does not cover the routine X-ray chest exam- 
ination required of all entering students, but the College is normally 
able to arrange to have this done at a minimum cost on one day 
each fall. If the student is not able to take advantage of this arrange- 
ment, it is his responsibility to supply the College before Christmas 
vacation with a satisfactory reading of chest X-rays. 

The Health Service does not cover diagnostic examination by 
outside specialists. The College will assist in making arrangements 
for such examination, including optical and dental work, surgery, 
special nursing, etc.; but the cost is the responsibility of the student. 
Hospitalization elsewhere than in the Infirmary, or medical care 
by others than by the College Physician, is also excluded from the 
benefits of the Health Service. 

THE CAMPUS CLUB 

A group of alumni and friends of the College, who are interested 
in preserving and improving the natural beauty of the campus, is 
organized as The Campus Club. The planning is done by an execu- 
tive committee which meets biannually for the purpose of laying out 
new projects. The Arboretum and the Woolman Walk were devel- 
oped and are maintained by The Campus Club. 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 

The College publishes annually the Haverford College Catalog, 
the President's Report, the Treasurer's Report, the Report of the 
Librarian, publications of the Faculty, and the College Directory. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships are of two kinds: competitive, and those awarded 
upon merit and individual need. No one scholarship is given for 
more than one year. 

No scholarship will be given to a student who has a failure against 
him at the time of application. 



Scholarships 81 

No scholarship will be given to a student whose college bill has 
not been paid in full. 

All preliminary correspondence and applications for undergradu- 
ate scholarships for 1946-1947, together with supporting letters from 
parents or guardians, should be in the hands of the President before 
Tuesday, April 2, 1946. 

It is assumed that requests for scholarships will not be made by 
those whose expenses can be met by their parents or from other 
sources. In the majority of cases the College expects work from 
scholarship students amounting proportionately to the value of 
each scholarship. 

I. Corporation Scholarships. — Sixteen scholarships are awarded 
at the end of each term, without formal application, to the four stu- 
dents in each class having the highest average grades for the term 
then closing. In the case of the incoming Freshman Class the scholar- 
ships will be assigned immediately after the entrance examinations 
(see page 22) to those candidates entering by any plan of admission, 
who are judged to be best prepared to do the work of the College. 
Corporation scholarships are 1 100.00 for the summer term and 
$150.00 for the fall and spring terms, respectively. 

II. Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. — Three scholarships, nor- 
mally $250 each, usually awarded to members of the Senior and 
Junior classes. 

III. Richard T. Jones Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

IV. Edward Yarnall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

V. Thomas P. Cope Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

VI. Sarah Marshall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of 



VII. Mary M. Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship normally 
of the annual value of $200. 

VIII. Joseph E. Gillingham Scholarships. — Four scholarships nor- 
mally of the annual value of $200 each "for meritorious students." 

IX. Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship, nor- 
mally of the annual value of $225, available for a student of Wilming- 
ton College or a member of Wilmington (Ohio) Yearly Meeting 
of Friends. 



82 Haverford College 

X. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships normally amount to $1500 an- 
nually. Usually these will be awarded in sums of $150 each, and 
in return for them certain academic duties may be required of the 
beneficiaries. 

XI. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships. — Eight scholarships normally 
of the annual value of $100 each. 

XII. Caspar Wistar Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship of $250 
is usually available, preferably for sons of parents engaged in Chris- 
tian service (including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions) or students desiring to prepare for similar service in America 
or other countries. 

XIII. Louis Jaquette Palmer Memorial Scholarship. — ^This schol- 
arship of $200 is awarded on application, preferably to a member of 
the Freshman Class who, in the opinion of a committee representing 
the donors and the President of the College, shall give evidence of 
possessing the qualities of leadership and constructive interest in 
student and community welfare which his friends observed in Louis 
Jaquette Palmer of the Class of 1894. 

XIV. /. Kennedy Moorhouse Memorial Scholarship, $300. — 
Intended for the member of the Freshman Class who shall appear 
best fitted to uphold at Haverford the standard of character and 
conduct typified by the late J. Kennedy Moorhouse of the Class of 
1900 — "a man modest, loyal, courageous, reverent without sancti- 
mony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in clean and 
joyous living." 

XV. Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVI. Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarships. — ^Two or 
more scholarships of the annual value of $250, preference to be given 
to "a native of New York or Connecticut and who now resides in 
one of those states." 

XVII. Samuel E. Hilles Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVIII. Class of 1913 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $125. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1913 who may apply and who meet the usual require- 
ments of the College. 

XIX. Isaac Sharpless Scholarship Fund. — Founded in 1941. 
Scholarships open to graduates of secondary schools and undergrad- 



Scholarships 83 

uates of Haverford College. Awards based upon fulfilment by appli- 
cant of requirements used in selection of Rhodes Scholars to the 
University of Oxford. Awards granted from list submitted to Selec- 
tion Committee by the Director of Admissions, subject always to 
final approval by the President of the College; amount variable. 

XX. Class of 1917 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $150. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1917 who may apply and who meet the usual require- 
ments of the College. 

XXI. The Geoffrey Silver Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship 
in the sum of $500 will be available to a Public School graduate in 
this general area who may enter Haverford. 

XXII. Daniel B. Smith Fund for Scholarships. — Founded Octo- 
ber 6, 1943, by gift of $2500 from Anna Wharton Wood of Waltham, 
Massachusetts. This will be increased by a bequest of $2500 made 
by Miss Esther Morton Smith of Germantown, Philadelphia, who 
died March 18, 1942. 

"The income is to be used, in the discretion of the Faculty, as an 
annual scholarship for some young man needing financial aid in his 
College course." Preference is to be given to a descendant of their 
father, Benjamin R. Smith, if any such should apply. 

XXIII. Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund. — 
Founded November 1, 1943, by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. 
Hilles, 1888, in memory of his mother, Sarah Tatum Hilles, "to pro- 
vide for such number of annual scholarships of $250 each as such 
income shall be sufficient to create"; to be awarded by the Managers 
upon "needy and deserving students, and to be known as 'Sarah 
Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships.' " 

XXIV. Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund. — Established 
February 2, 1944, by Mrs. Elihu Grant "to commemorate the service 
to Haverford College of Dr. Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938 a mem- 
ber of the College Faculty. The income from this fund is applied to 
scholarship assistance to students in Humanistic studies, primarily 
those specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental 
Subjects." In special circumstances the income may be utilized to 
assist those working for a postgraduate degree at Haverford College. 
Two scholarships of $300 each are available. 

Most of the scholarships listed above are permanent founda- 
tions. In addition, the alumni in various districts support regional 
scholarships. 



84 Haverford College 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Clementine Cope Fellowship, of the annual value of $700, 
may be awarded by the Faculty to the best qualified applicant from 
the Senior Class. He is required to spend the succeeding year in 
study at some American or foreign university approved by the 
Faculty. Applications for the Clementine Cope Fellowship should 
be in the hands of the President of the College before March I. 

Teaching Fellowships. — With the remaining funds from the 
Clementine Cope Foundation there may be appointed one or more 
graduates of Haverford College as Teaching Fellows, with or without 
specific duties at Haverford College; or a second Cope Fellow may 
be appointed with a stipend of $400 or $500, as the income of the 
Fund may permit. 

Graduate Fellowships. — For information regarding graduate fel- 
lowships, see page 37. 

PRIZES 

All material submitted in competition for prizes should be depos- 
ited with the Registrar under assumed names, with a sealed envelope 
containing the writer's real name, before May 1. 

All prizes awarded in books are marked with appropriate book- 
plates. As soon as possible after the award a list of standard books, 
from which selection is to be made, should be submitted for approval 
to the head of the department awarding the prize. Books selected 
from the approved list may then be ordered through the College 
Office or elsewhere. The College grants an average discount of 
ten per cent on prize books, and supplies the bookplates. 

Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory 

The Alumni Association, in the year 1875, established an annual 
prize of |50 for excellence in composition and oratory. 

John B. Garrett Prizes for Systematic Reading 
IN Literature 

A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $25 will be given at the 
end of the Junior or Senior year to the two students who, besides 
creditably pursuing their regular course of study, shall have carried 
on the most profitable program of reading in a period or compre- 
hensive topic in the field of liteature (ancient, American, or foreign) 
during at least two years of their college career. 

The administration of these prizes is in the hands of the Commit- 
tee on Fellowships and Prizes, with which the candidate shall register 



Prizes 85 

and which shall approve the subject chosen. The Committee will 
then recommend the candidate to the department or departments 
to which he should apply for counsel and guidance. An oral exam- 
ination will be arranged in the final year to determine the scope 
and quality of the reading. 

The winners will be determined by the Committee after consulta- 
tion with the departments concerned. Either or both of these prizes 
may be omitted if, in the judgment of the Committee, the work does 
not justify an award. 

The Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin and Mathematics 
These are two prizes worth |10 each. They will be awarded in 
books at the end of the Sophomore year to the students who have 
done the best work for the two years in Latin and Mathematics, 
respectively. 

The Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry 
The Class of 1898, on the twenty-fifth anniversary of their gradua- 
tion, established a prize in honor of Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor 
of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 1917. 

This prize amounts to $100 and may be awarded to a student who 
has attained a high degree of proficiency in Chemistry and who shows 
promise of contributing substantially to the advancement of the 
science. This prize may be awarded to a Junior, to a Senior, or to 
a graduate of Haverford College within three years after gradua- 
tion. It may be awarded more than once to the same student, or 
may be withheld. 

The Class of 1902 Prize in Latin 
The Class of 1902 offers a prize of $10 in books to the Freshman 
whose work in Latin, in recitation and examinations combined, shall 
be the most satisfactory to the professor in charge of the Department. 

The Department Prizes in Mathematics 
A first prize of $15 and a second prize of $10 are awarded on the 
basis of a three hour examination on selected topics in Freshman 
Mathematics. The examination is held on the first Monday after 
the Spring Recess, and is open to Freshmen only. 

The Elliston P. Morris Prize 
A prize of $40, open to all undergraduates and to graduates of 
not more than three years' standing, is offered every year for the 



86 Haverford College 

best essay bearing on the general problem of "International Peace 
and the Means of Securing It." No prize will be awarded unless a 
high standard of merit is attained. Essays should be deposited with 
the Registrar before May 1. The judges shall be appointed by the 
President of the College. For the 1945-46 competition the following 
subjects are ofiEered: 

1. The relationship between atomic energy and international 
peace. 

2. A critical evaluation of the contributions of the United Nations 
Organization to international peace. 

3. Race Relations and World Peace. 

4. Universal peace-time conscription and world peace. 

5. The implications of extensive programs of relief and rehabili- 
tation for international peace. 

The presentation should be not merely a catalog of events but also 
an interpretation and estimate of them. Each essay should contain 
references, in the form of footnotes and bibliography, to the authori- 
ties consulted. 

Essays for this prize submitted by undergraduates may also be sub- 
mitted for the Elizabeth P. Smith Prize, but the two prizes will not 
be awarded to one person. 

The Elizabeth P. Smith Prize 
A prize of $40 is ofiEered annually to the undergraduate who pre- 
sents the best essay on international peace under the same conditions 
and terms as the Elliston P. Morris Prize. Essays for this prize should 
be deposited with the Registrar before May 1. The judges shall be 
appointed by the President of the College. 

Prizes in Philosophy and Biblical Literature 
A prize of $40 in books is oflFered each year to any student who, in 
the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most satisfactory 
amount of outside reading in Philosophy in connection with the 
courses in that Department. A second prize of $25 in books is also 
ofiEered. 

A prize of $40 in books is offered each year to any student who, in 
the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most satisfactory 
amount of reading on the Bible and related subjects. A second prize 
of $25 in books is also ofiEered. 



Prizes 87 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes 
A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $45 will be given at the 
end of the Senior year to the two students who, in the opinion of 
the judges appointed by the President of the College, show the 
most steady and marked improvement in scholarship during their 
college course. 

The Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes 
Two prizes of $15 and $10, respectively, are awarded for the 
best verse written by a Haverford undergraduate during the year. 
Typewritten manuscript, under an assumed name, should be de- 
posited with the Registrar not later than May 1. The judges shall 
be appointed by the President of the College. 

The Logan Pearsall Smith Prize 
An annual award of $50 in books will be made to that member of 
the Senior Class who, in the opinion of the Committee on Prizes, has 
the best personal library. Consideration of the books collected will 
be entirely independent of their cost. 

Candidates must register with the Committee on Fellowships and 
Prizes before March 1. The contest closes May 1. By that date every 
candidate shall have deposited with the Registrar a list of books 
and a brief essay explaining the purpose of his collection. 

The Founders Club Prize 
A prize of $25 is ofiFered by the Founders Club to the Freshman 
who is judged to have shown the best attitude toward college activi- 
ties and scholastic work. 

The S. p. Lippincott Prize in History 

A prize of $100 is offered for competition in the Department of 
History under the following general provisions: 

First — ^The prize may be withheld in any year, if the conditions 
listed below are not met by any of the competitors to the satisfaction 
of a majority of the judges. 

Second — The prize shall not be awarded twice to the same student. 

Third — Competition is open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors 
who have taken or are taking work in the Department of History. 

Conditions 
In competition for this prize an essay of not less than 5,000 
words shall be submitted as evidence of scholarly ability in the col- 



88 Haverford College 

lection and presentation of historical material, treating a subject 
selected from a list announced by the Department of History before 
November 15. The essay should contain references in footnotes to 
the authorities consulted and a bibliography of works cited. 

The essay shall be typewritten and deposited, under an assumed 
name, with the Registrar before May 1. 

For the competition of 1945-46 the following subjects are sub- 
mitted: 

1. The development of the English Church during the Reign of 
Henry VIII. 

2. German Reparations, 1919-1933. 

3. Southern Arguments in Defense of Slavery after 1830. 

4. The Relations between the United States and Japan from 
1921 to 1941. 

The NEwrroN Prize in English Literature 
The Newton Prize in English Literature ($50) may be awarded 
annually on the basis of Final Honors in English, provided that 
the work of the leading candidate, in the judgment of the English 
Department, merits this award. 

The William Ellis Scull Prize 
The William Ellis Scull Prize ($50) will be awarded annually to 
the upperclassman who shall have shown the "greatest achievement 
in voice and the articulation of the English language." 

The George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics 
In memory of Dr. George Peirce, 1903, a prize of $50 is offered 
annually to a student of Chemistry or Mathematics "who has shown 
marked proficiency in either or both of these studies and who intends 
to follow a profession which calls for such preparation. Preference 
is to be given to a student who has elected organic chemistry, and 
failing such a student, to one who has elected Mathematics or some 
branch of Chemistry other than organic. Should there be two stu- 
dents of equal promise, the one who is proficient in Greek shall be 
given preference." The prize is offered, however, exclusively for 
students who expect to engage in research, and it will not be awarded 
unless the candidate has this intention. 



Prizes 89 

The National Foundation for Education in 
American Citizenship Prize 

A cash prize of $100 for the best essay by a Haverford under- 
graduate on the subject of "The Basic Principles Underlying the 
Government of the United States" is offered by the National Founda- 
tion for Education in American Citizenship. The essay shall be 
typewritten, shall not exceed five thousand words, and must be 
deposited, under an assumed name, with the Registrar before May 1. 
Accelerating Seniors are eligible for this competition and may sub- 
mit their essays within one year after leaving College. 



DEGREES, PRIZES, AND HONORS 
GRANTED IN 1944-1945 

DEGREES 
The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
January 27, 1945: 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 
Kent Franke Balls, 1945 Ruth Antoinette Driscoll, 1945 

John Howard Benge, 1945 Richard William Norton, Jr., 1944 

MuRDOCK Stearns Bowman, 1943 Robert Gilmore Pontius, 1945 

Robert Paul deLong, 1945 Edmund Preston, III, 1945 

Paul Henry Domincovich, 1945 John Walker Stuart, 1945 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
Francis Evarts Fairman, III, 1945 William Robert McShane, 1944 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
June 2, 1945: 

DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 
Henry Shoemaker Conard, 1894 

MASTERS OF ARTS 

Sydney Thomson Brown (B.A., Smith, 1943) 

Thesis: "American Newcomers: A study of recent European refugees and of 
the refugee service agencies in New York City." 

Fay Gilkey Calkins (B.A., Oberlin, 1943) 

Thesis: "Colonia Santa Rosa, Mexico: Organization and Administration of 
a Polish Refugee Camp" (In collaboration with Miss Laurama Page) . 

Sarah Comfort Gary (A.B., Vassar, 1940) 

Thesis: "Formal Education in Germany: Retrospect and Prospect." 

Helen Joy Fowle (B.A., WeUesley, 1943) 

Thesis: "Sleighton Farm Training for Life: A Study in Juvenile Rehabili- 
tation." 

Elizabeth Brosius Garrison (A.B., Swarthmore, 1938) 

Thesis: "The Resettlement of Japanese-Americans in the Philadelphia Area." 

Annette Roberts Jones (B.A., WeUesley, 1941) 
(M.Ed., Winnetka, 1942) 
Thesis: "Jewish Resettlement in Palestine." 

Laurama Page (B.A., Swarthmore, 1943) 

Thesis: "Colonia Santa Rosa, Mexico: Organization and Administration of 
a Polish Refugee Camp" (In collaboration with Miss Fay Calkins) . 

Lois Virginia Plumb (B.A., Wilson College, 1943) 

Thesis: "A Program for the Employment of Youth in Farm Labor, 1942- 
1945." 

Jean Adele Wehmeyer (B.A., Smith, 1943) 

Thesis: "Some of the Social and Psychological Problems of Camp Manage- 
ment as illustrated in the Japanese Relocation Centers." 

Mary Esther Williams (B.A., Vassar, 1943) 

Thesis: "A Study of Principles and Operations of Federal Migratory Labor 
Camps in the United States." 

90 



Degrees, 1944-45 91 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 

John Post Beardsley, 1945 Theodore Martin Hiltner, 1946 

Angus Malcolm Cameron, 1946 James Sewell Hutchins, Jr., 1945 

Lewis Edward Coffin, 1946 John Kelwav Libby, 1946 

Edward Marshall Cook, Jr., 1946 David Eugene Long, 1946 

Robert Crocker Good, 1946 Philip Carl Mann, 2nd, 1945 

Earl Wesley Grecson, 1945 Philip Fletcher McLellan, 1945 

Theophilus John Hierter, 1945 Thomas Joseph Ryan, Jr., 1946 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
August 24, 1945: 

MASTERS OF ARTS 
Anna Margaret Atkinson (A.B., Brown, 1942) 

Thesis: "The High School Age Group in the War Relocation Centers, Their 
Program and Activities." 

Mary Barclay (A.B., Middlebury, 1943) 

Thesis: "Volunteer Work Communities in Postwar Europe." 

Maria Luisa Gildemeister (B.A., Haverford, February, 1944) 

Thesis: "American Relief and Reconstruction Work in Austria, 1918-1923." 

Arthur Walden Palmer, Jr. (B.A., Amherst, 1942) 

Thesis: "A Biographical Index to the Barrett-Browning Love Letters." 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 
Thomas Alonzo Benham (B.S., Haverford, 1938) 

Thesis: Part One — "Theory and Application of Bessel Functions." 
Part Two — "High Frequency Demonstration Experiments." 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 
Frederick Henry Bartlett, Jr., 1946 Sheldon Harley Gross, 1946 
Thomas Morrison Birdsall, 1946 Howard Tenbroek Lutz, 1943 

William Huston Chartener, 1946 James Fenninger Mumma, 1946 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
Donald BABBrrx McNeill, 1946 George Montgomery, Jr., 1946 

PRIZE FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

(for graduate study at another institution) 

Clementine Cope Fellowships for 1944-1945 
David Eugene Long, 1946 Masamori Kojima, 1945 

Corporation Scholarships for the Summer Term, 1945 

(Award Made on the Basis of Semesters Completed) 

7 Semesters 
William Huston Chartener 

5-6 Semesters 
JiH-ius Katchen 

3-4 Semesters 
James Fowler Adams, Jr. William Hamilton Harris 

7-2 Semesters 
David Edward Thomas Judson LaMoitre Ihrig 

Entering Class 
George Elson Ruff, Jr. 



92 Haverford College 

Corporation Scholarships for the Fall Term, 1945-1946 

1-8 Semesters 
Roberto Pablo Payr6 Julius Katchen 

5-6 Semesters 
James Fowler Adams, Jr. Alan Spencer Rogers 

3—4 Semesters 
WiLUAM Hamilton Harris Monroe Edward Alenick 

1~2 Semesters 
Richard Arden Couch James Babbitt Hastings 

Entering Class 
Sttephen Raben Miller Paul Sherwood Kelly 

PRIZES 

The Class of 1896 Prize tn Mathematics ($10 in books) for Sophomores 
Ian Huebsch, 1947 

The Class of 1902 Prize in Latin ($10 in books) for Freshmen 
Alan Mark Levensohn, 1948 

The Mathematics Department Prize ($15) for Freshmen 
Harold Frederick Vedova, 1948 

The Elizabeth P. Smith Prize ($20) for the best essay on international peace 
Robert Barlow, 1948 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes ($95) for the two Seniors who have 

shown the most steady and marked improvement in 

scholarship during the college course 

First Prize ($50) —Philip Carl Mann, 2nd, 1945 

Second Prize ($45) — Paul Henry Domincovich, 1945 

The Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes ($25) for the best verse written by a 
Haverford undergraduate during the year 

First Prize ($15) — ^James Donald Walters, 1947 

Second Prize ($10) — Alfred Durant Grossman, 1948 

The Founders Club Prize ($25) for the Freshman who has shown the best 
attitude toward college activities and scholastic work 

William Pierson Barker, II, 1948 

The S. P. Lippincott Prize in History ($100) for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors 

Richard D. Rivers, 1947 

The William Ellis Scull Prize ($50) for the upperclassman who 

shall have shown the "greatest achievement in voice and 

the articulation of the English Language" 

John Post Beardsley, 1945 

The National Foundation for Education in American Citizenship Prize ($100) 

for the best essay on "The Basic Principles Underlying the 

Government of the United States" 

James Donald Walters, 1947 



Honors, 1944-45 93 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

The following students have been elected to the 
PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 
Masamori Kojima, 1945 Lewis Edward Coffin, 1946 

David Eugene Long, 1946 Edward Burroughs Irving, Jr., 1944 

The following students have been elected to the 

FOUNDERS CLUB 

for merit in both studies and college activities 

1944 

Thomas Paton Goodman, 1946 Joseph Stokes, III, 1946 

Walter Yoneo Kato, 1946 James Boyer Wright, 1945 

David Eugene Long, 1946 

1945 
Lewis Edward Coffin, 1946 Masamori Kojima, 1945 

Paul Henry Domincovich, 1945 Richard D. Rivers, 1947 

Robert Crocker Good, 1946 Lawrence D. Steefel, Jr., 1947 

Julius Katchen, 1947 

The following students have been elected to 

TAU KAPPA ALPHA 

National Hbnorary Debating Fraternity 

1944 

Daniel Bard Thompson, 1948 

1945 

Timothy Breed Atkeson, 1948 Julius Katchen, 1947 

Robert Pearson Roche, 1947 

HONORS 

FINAL HONORS 

Including Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors awarded upon gradua- 
tion, and by vote of the Faculty on recommendation of a department or group of 
related departments. Awarded only to students whose work has been more pro- 
found in a given field, or more extensive in scope than the minimum required, 
and who have fulfilled all the requirements for Final Honors in their respective 
Major Departments. 

High Honors 

William Huston Chartener, 1946 History 

David Yi-Yung Hsia, 1945 Chemistry 

Masamori Kojima, 1945 Government 

David Eugene Long, 1946 Government 

Honors 

Edward Block, 1945 Physics 

Paul Henry Domincovich, 1945 Reconstruction and Relief 

Ruth Antoinette Driscoll, 1945 Reconstruction and Relief 

Robert Crocker Good, 1946 Philosophy 

HONORABLE MENTION 

In single courses in the Freshman or Sophomore year representing a minimum 
of 60 hours of Honors work in addition to that required for the course named, 
plus a grade of 88 or better in the same course. 

Timothy Breed Atkeson, 1948 Government 3a 

Timothy Breed Atkeson, 1948 Government 13a 

Richard Kenneth Dorn, 1948 English 2b 

Martin Julius Oppenheimer, 1948 English 2b 

John Alexander Stone, 1948 English 2b 



DIRECTORY 
STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory 
room; Be for Barclay Center, Bn for Barclay North, F for Founders 
Hall, G.H. for Government House, L.H. for Language House, L for 
Lloyd Hall, D for day student. The field of major concentration is 
indicated in parentheses. The figure following the name indicates 
the number of the term now being completed. 

Name Home Address College Address 

A 

ADAMS, James Fowler, Jr., 6 (Philosophy) 26 L 

2900 Harrison Street, Wilmington, Del. 
ALENICK, Monroe Edward, 5 (Chemistry) 37 L 

292 Eastern Parkway, Newark 6, N. J. 
ALLINSON, Andrew Prevost (History) 7 L 

Town's End Farm, West Chester, Pa. 
ALLYN, Herman Bryden, II, 1 63 Bn 

10 State Street, Framingham Centre, Mass. 

B 

BAKER, William Perrin, Jr., 2 23 L 

355 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton, Pa. 
BALDI, Virgil Bismarck, Jr., 2 21 F 

437 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BARKER, William Pierson, II, 5 (Biblical Literature) 21 L 

1553 Shorb Avenue, N.W., Canton 3, Ohio 
BARRAZA, Carlos, 1 70 Bn 

Donato Guerra 315 S, Torreon, Coah, Mexico 
BECK, Stuart Morgan, I 14 L 

3900 Cathedral Avenue, N.W., Washington 16, D.C. 
BEHRENS, Robert H D 

4042 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BELL, William Warren, 5 (History) 25 L 

4409 Greenwich Parkway, N.W., Washington 7, D. C. 
BESSE, Byron Earl, 4 (Chemistry) D 

823 Old Gulph Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
BIRDSALL, Joseph Cooper, Jr., 4 29 L 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
BLECKER, Solomon, 5 38 L 

5022 N. lOth Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. 
BOGER, John Neil, 1 69 Bn 

341 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 
BOUZARTH, William Francis, II, 5 (Chemistry) 22 L 

635 Belair Avenue, Aberdeen, Md. 
BRENES, Luis Guillermo, 1 67 Bn 

San Jose, Costa Rica 
BRIEGER, Henry Arthur Nicholas, 3 15 F 

58 N. Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
BRODHEAD, Charles Daniel, 1 10 F 

621 Rising Sun Avenue, Philadelphia 40, Pa. 

94 



Directory 95 

Name Home Address College Address 

BROWNLEE, John Erskine, 1 68 Bn 

6531 Holmes Street, Kansas City 5, Mo. 
BRUCKNER, Robert J., 1 D 

911 Kenmore Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BUTTRICK, David Gardner, 3 34 Be 

21 E. 79th Street. New York, N. Y. 

c 

CARROLL, John MacGregor, 1 58 Bn 

468 Riverside Drive, New York City 
CLAYTON, Robert Francis, Jr., 6 (Mathematics) 1 L 

49 E. Providence Road, Lansdowne, Pa. 
CLEWS, Margaret, Special Student D 

Dorset Road, Devon, Pa. 
CLEWS, M. Madison, Special Student D 

Dorset Road, Devon, Pa. 
COAXES, George Morrison, 2nd, Special Student D 

Paoli, Pa. 
COHEN, Walter Leo, Special Student 24 F 

73 E. Market Street, Long Beach, L. 1., N. Y. 
COLLINS, Benjamin McVickar, 3 32 L 

Broadlea Farm, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 
COOPER, Nathaniel Fenimore, 1 13 L 

453 N. Highland Avenue, Merion, Pa. 
COUCH, Richard Arden, 2 12 F 

601 Clearview Avenue, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 
CULBERT, Craig Dunlap, 3 D 

26 Chatham Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
CUMBEE, H. Wayne, 2 5 L 

2430 Boulevard Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

D 

DALLETT, Francis James, Jr., 1 D 

324 Overhill Road, Wayne, Pa. 
DAVIES, David Elwyn, 2 1 1 F 

3012 -44th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
DAVIS, Francis A., Jr., 2 29 L 

304 Somerset Road, Baltimore 70, Md. 
DAVIS, John Gilman, 1 15 L 

76 Brooks Street, West Medford, Mass. 
DE MARCO, Michael Charles, 2 D 

7201 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia 26, Pa. 
DINKER, William Richard Merion Annex 

12 N. Portland Avenue, Ventnor, N. J. 
DISBROW, Donald Willis, 1 66 Bn 

R. D. 3, Dundee, New York 
DORN, Richard Kenneth, 4 17 L 

6140 Nassau Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
DRAKE, C. Daniel, 3 14L 

47 Main Street, Franklin, N. J. 
DVORKEN, Henry Jacob, 2 14 F 

435 W. Fifth Avenue, Roselle, N. J. 

E 

ECHIKSON, Edward, 1 33 L 

31 Midland Boulevard, Maplewood, N. J. 
EDGERTON, Charles Willis, Jr., 3 30 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
EDGERTON, Robert, 2 10 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 



96 Haverford College 

Name Home Address College Address 

EISELE, George William, 1 D 

(404 Center Street, Westmont, N. J.) 

1438 Westwood Lane, Overbrook Hills, Pa. 
ESHLEMAN, Benjamin, Jr., 1 27 L 

Mountpleasant Road, Villa Nova, Pa. 
EWELL, Albert Hunter, Jr., 8 (Psychology) 38 L 

4937 Walton Avenue, Philadelphia 43, Pa. 
EXTON, Frederick, Jr., 2 G.H. 

4519 Davenport Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

F 

FALTERMAYER, Edmund Kase, 2 G.H. 

46 E. Gowen Avenue, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FEROE, Barton Kenneth, 5 D 

213 Marlboro Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
FINCH, George Frank, Jr., 1 31 Be 

509 E. Mt. Airy Avenue, Philadelphia 19, Pa. 
FREEMAN, Murray Fox, 5 (Mathematics) D 

324 N. Bowman Avenue, Merion, Pa. 

G 

GANTER, Robert Lewis, 3 30 Be 

830 Elsinore Place, Chester, Pa. 
GARDNER, Kenneth Adelman, 2 12 L 

2214 Forest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
GEBHARDT, John Frank, 2 35 L 

140 E. 29th Street, Erie, Pa. 
GERLACH, Thomas Bradfield, 1 72 Bn 

1526 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GIFFORD, Thomas, 1 50 Bn 

468 Hope Street, Providence 6, R. L 
GOODMAN, I. Robert, 2 11 L 

3749 Nortonia Road, Baltimore 16, Md. 
GOULD, Stanley Benton, 2 IIL 

3505 Edgewood Road, Baltimore, Md. 

H 

HAMILTON, Richard Truitt, 6 8 L 

Rosslvn Farms, Carnegie, Pa. 
HAMMOND, Stanley George, 2 Be, 4th floor, E. 

104 Park Road, Llanerch, Pa. 
HAND, Thomas Spencer, 1 54 Bn 

1 Holmcrest Road, Jenkintown, Pa. 
HANDRICH, Paul Charles, 1 68 Bn 

48 Colonial Road, Bellerose, L. I., N. Y. 
HARDEN, Robert Schermerhorn, 3 30 L 

341 E. Main Street, Moorestown, N. J. 
HARPER, Robert, 2 24 L 

190 Crowell Avenue, Staten Island, N. Y. 
HARRIS, Margaret G., Special Student Merion Annex 

774 Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
HARRIS, William Hamilton, 5 (Chemistry) 34 L 

204 N. 17th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
HARRIS, William Macey, 7 Merion Annex 

774 Millbrook Lane. Haverford, Pa. 
HARVEY, Randolph Charles, 4 19 L 

112 Chamounix Road, St. Davids, Pa. 
HASTINGS, David Spencer, 1 69 Bn 

79 Connecticut Avenue, Kensington, Md. 



Directory 97 

Name Home Address College Address 

HASTINGS, James Babbitt, 2 10 L 

30 Elston Road, Upper Montclair, N. J. 
HAUGHTON, Anson B., 7 (Engineering) D 

Radnor Inn, Radnor, Pa. 
HAUSER, John Norman, 3 24 L 

7443 Oakhill Avenue, Wauwatosa, Wis. 
HAZELWOOD, Robert Nichols, 2 25 L 

3405 N. Hackett Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
HEDGES, William Leonard, 7, (History) 16 F 

9 John Street, Providence, R. I. 
HENNE, John Kraffert, 6 (Chemistry) 32 L 

332 W. Oak Street, Titusville, Pa. 
HERTER, Theophilus John, Graduate Student D 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. 
HIGINBOTHOM, William Curran, 3 25 L 

5403 Springlake Way, Baltimore, Md. 
HOLLINGSHEAD, Irving, Jr., 1 51 Bn 

309 Chestnut Street, Moorestown, N. J. 
HOOPES, John Robison, Jr., 3 37 Be 

5500 Moorland Lane, Bethesda, Md. 
HOSKINS, Robert Graham, 2 L.H. 

86 Barick Road, Waban 68, Mass. 
HOWE, Gerald Shropshire 28 L 

Detachment VII Corps, Camp San Luis Obispo, Calif. 
HUEBSCH, Ian, 6 (Mathematics) 7b F 

285 Central Park, West, New York 24, N. Y. 

J 

JACKSON, John Albert, 2 5 F 

20 Summer Street, Adams, Mass. 
JACOB, James Archibald, Jr., 4 (Chemistry) 21 L 

1310 Pleasant Avenue, Wellsburg, W. Va. 
JACOBS, George Wayne, Jr., 6 (Mathematics) 27 L 

The Kingsway, Bloomingdale Avenue, Wavne, Pa. 
JOHNSON, David, 7 .' 3 L 

18 W. 122nd Street, New York, N. Y. 
JOHNSON, James Dexter, 2 5 L 

250 S. Brentwood, Clayton, Mo. 
JOHNSON, Richard Schaper, 3 31L 

328 W. 22nd Street, Erie, Pa. 
JOHNSON, Victor Lawrence, 1 13 L 

1007 Valley Road, Melrose Park, Pa. 
JOHNSTON, Robert James, Jr., 2 D 

Merion Hall, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. ^ 
JONES, Corson 39 Be 

9 Hesketh Street, Chevy Chase, Md. 
JONES, Evan Gordon Newton, 1 L.H. 

Hectors River P. O., Jamaica, B. W. I. 

K 

KATCHEN, Julius, 8 (Philosophy) 20 L 

2 Hollywood Avenue, W. Long Branch, N. J. 
KATO, Walter Yoneo, 7 (Physics) 21b F 

5210 Winthrop Avenue, Chicago 40, 111. 
KEETZ, Francis A., 1 D 

Hilldale Road, Villa Nova, Pa. 
KELLY, Paul Sherwood, 1 15 L 

118 W. 36th Street, Erie, Pa. 
KINDLER, Don, 3 18 L 

Jessups, Md. 



98 Haverford College 

L 

Name Home Address College Address 

LAITY, Walter Asbury, 1 58 Bn 

105 Elliott Place, East Orange, N. J. 
LAMBERT, Richard Meredith, 2 15 F 

104 Webster Avenue, Wyncote, Pa. 
LASDAY, Harrison Robert, 1 60 Bn 

1322 Square Hill Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
LASH, William Stanley Mallory, 1 22 F 

R. R. 1, Fonthill, Ontario, Canada 
LEAMAN, Arthur, 4 (Spanish) 30 F 

40 Fifth Avenue, Apt. 7D, New York City 
LEE, Charles Smith, Jr., Special Student 19 L 

518 Audubon Avenue, Philadelphia 18, Pa. 
LEUCHTER, Ben Zion 2 L 

East Park Avenue, Vineland, N. J. 
LEVINSON, Henry Walter, 3 18 L 

4724 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
LIBBY, Edward Kelway, 2 G.H. 

1324 Euclid Street, N.W., Washington 9, D.C. 
LIMBER, Wayne Stevenson, 1 56 Bn 

166 Elm Street, Montpelier, Vt. 
LONGSTRETH, Frank Hoover, Graduate Student D 

31 Railroad Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
LONGSTRETH, Martha Comfort, Special Student D 

31 Railroad Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

M 

MALEY, Eugene Pat 9 F 

1414 Regina Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 
MARVIN, John Howell Williams, 1 67 Bn 

100 Park Place, Kingston, Pa. 
MATHIAS, Edward Trail, 1 53 Bn 

103 Council Street, Frederick, Md. 
MATLACK, Charles William G.H. 

King's Highway, Moorestown, N. J. 
McGUIRE, Charles Robison, 1 36 Be 

3310 Warrington Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
MEAD, Brian, Jr., 5 (Chemistry) 34 L 

11 Hbrseguard Lane, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
MELCHIOR, Charles M., 1 35 Be 

108 Greenwood Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
MILLER, Bruce Marten, 5 (Chemistry) 35 L 

c/o Ward, 1608 Upshur, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
MILLER, James Quinter, 1 60 Bn 

10 Manor Drive, Tuckahoe 7, N. Y. 
MILLER, Stephen Raben, 1 62 Bn 

1501 Undercliff Avenue, Bronx 53. N. Y. 
MOORE, Charles Byrd, 3 6L 

25 Amherst Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 
MORRIS, Robert Lee, 1 71 Bn 

90 Oakwood Avenue, Long Branch, N. J. 
MOSES, Charles Henry Mann, Jr., 5 (Chemistry) D 

433 Haverford Road, Wynnewood, Pa. 

N 

NAMY, Claude A., 1 6 F 

97 Brd. de la Resistance, Casablanca, Morocco 
NEWMAN, Paul Freedman, 4 64 Bn 

7 Balfour Circle, Lansdowne, Pa. 



Directory 99 

Name Home Address College Addrest 

NEYERLIN, John Thomas Merion Annex 

NICKLIN, George Leslie, Jr., 2 L.H. 

Alden Park Manor, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 

O 

OBERHOLTZER, Wendell Woodward D 

Mont Clare, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
OLIVIER, Daniel Dretzka, 4 G.H. 

Box 306, R. D. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. 
OSWALD, David Statton, 4 (Chemistry) 37 L 

826 The Terrace, Hagerstown, Md. 

P 

PARKE, Robert Gerber, 1 66 Bn 

20 Cornell Place, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 
PAYNE, William Spencer, 5 34 L 

91 Pointer Lane, Clayton 5, Mo. 
PAYR6, Roberto Pablo, 8 (English) 3 L 

Lavalle 357, Buenos Aires, Argentina 
PETERS, David Alexander, 5 (Chemistry) 23 L 

45 N. 11th Street, AUentown, Pa. 
PETERSEN, Hans Eberhard, 7 (Greek) 7a F 

145 - 95th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
POST, Arnold Rae, 7 (History) D 

9 College Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Q 

QUEK, Soo Tong, 2 4 L 

115 W. 73rd Street, New York City 

R 

RAMIREZ, Rafael Roberto, Jr., Special Student 71 Bn 

Box 205, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 
REYNOLDS, Edward Allan, 1 2 F 

111 Spring Avenue, Chestertown, Md. 
REYNOLDS, James Conrad, 2 16 L 

208 W. State Street, Kennett Square, Pa. 
RICHIE, Douglas Hooten, 2 11 F 

8 N. Main Street, Brewster, N. Y. 
RIVERS, Richard D., 7 (Physics) 33 Be 

1281 Everett Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 
ROBINSON, Richard Edward, 1 52 Bn 

San Ignacio #22, Altos, Havana, Cuba 
ROCHE, Robert Pearson, 8 (English) 1 L 

111 -7th Street, Garden City, N. Y. 
ROGERS, Alan Spencer, 7 D 

Woodside Cottage, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 
RUFF, George Elson, Jr., 2 36 L 

7358 Rural Lane, Philadelphia 19, Pa. 

s 

SCHUMAN, Richard Waldron, 8 31L 

2210 Forrest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
SETTLE, Lyle G., 5 (Music) L.H. 

Dryden, N. Y. 
SHAKESPEARE, Edward Oram, 1 D 

482 Sabine Avenue, Wynnewood, Pa. 
SHEPARD, Royal Francis, Jr., 2 36 L 

128 N. Mountain Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 



100 Haverford College 

Name Home Address College Address 

SINGER, Ellis Paul, 1 33 L 

139 Tuscan Road, Maplewood, N. J. 
SNODGR ASS, Francis Mattlage, 1 5 L 

Windfall, R. D. 1, Martinsburg, W. Va. 
SPROULE, Joseph D 

College Avenue and Darby Road, Haverford, Pa. 
STEEFEL, Lawrence D., Jr., 7 (History) D 

430 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 
STEERE, Paul Winsor L.H. 

Marquette, Mich. 
STERN, Thomas Louis, 1 66 Bn 

88-10 Whithey Avenue, Elmhurst, L. L, N. Y. 
STEWART, David William, II, 1 D 

117 St. Paul's Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
STONE, John Alexander, 4 (History) 26 L 

319 W. 88th Street, Apartment 8, New York, N, Y. 
STURR, George Bowler Tullidge, 7 (Government) 17 L 

129 Fourth Avenue, Haddon Heights, N. J. 
SWARTLEY, William Mover, 3 24 L 

Woodland Drive, Lansdale, Pa. 

T 

TAGGART, George Webster, 3 19 L 

1245 E. Broad Street, Hazleton, Pa. 
THOMAS, David Edward, 4 (Economics) 19 L 

518 Foss Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
THOMPSON, Daniel Bard, 6 (Biblical Literature) 21 L 

110 S. Broad Street, Waynesboro, Pa. 
THORPE, James Hancock, 1 68 Bn 

Apt. A.I., 7910- 19th Road, Jackson Heights, L. I., N. Y. 
TODD, John Arnold, 1 21 F 

Serpentine Lane, Wyncote, Pa. 
TOLAN, David John, 1 61 Bn 

2951 N. Marietta Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
TURNER, Conrad William, 1 51 Bn 

307 Hamilton Road, Wynnewood, Pa. 
TYCHANICH, John Dimitri, 2 12 L 

53 Balmforth Avenue, Danbury, Conn. 

V 

VAUGHAN, Clark A., 2 Be, 4th floor, E. 

Gate House, Milton Academy, Milton 86, Mass. 
VEDOVA, Harold Frederick, 3 D 

1463 Hampstead Road, Penn Wynne, Philadelphia 31, Pa. 

W 

WAGNER, Daniel Hobson, 6 39 Be 

10 Conestoga Road, Berwyn, Pa. 
WALNUT, Francis Kane, 1 18 F 

1 Lehman Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
WHITE, Robert Phillips, 3 36 Be 

301 Brookline Court Apts., Brookline, Upper Darby, Pa. 
WHITEHEAD, Herbert Macy, 8 (Philosophy) 30 F 

R. D. #1, South Windham, Maine 
WHITMAN, John Turner, 4 20 L 

Nashawtuc Hill, Concord, Mass. 
WIDMER, Robert J., Special Student D 

7G8 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
WILCOX, John Rogers, 2 16 L 

127 South West Street, Allentown, Pa. 



Directory 101 

Name Home Address CoIIece Address 

WINDER, Richard Bayly, IV 3 F 

5908 Cedar Parkway, Chevy Chase, Md. 
WIRES, John Stanley, 6 (Philosophy) 3 F 

45 Windsor Road, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

WRIGHT, Theodore Craig, 2 22 F 

107 Lee Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 

Y 

YAM ANE, George Mitsuyoshi, 7 4L 

1938 Panoa Road, Honolulu 23, T. H. 

Z 

ZWEIFLER, Nathan Joseph, 5 (Chemistry) 22 L 

46 Wilbur Avenue, Newark 8, N. J. 

RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF TRAINING UNIT 

DOUGLAS, Deborah Adams (A.B., Sweet Briar, 1943) G.H. 

704 E. 44th Street, Savannah, Ga. 

ELLIOTT, Rosalie Calhoun (B.A., Mt. Holyoke, 1945) D 

(c/o J. D. Allen) 27 Tenmore Road, H^averford, Pa. 

(418 Belvedere Street, La Jolla, Calif.) 
FEISE, DoRELEN (B.A., Oberlin, 1944) G.H. 

401 Rosebank Avenue, Baltimore 12, Md. 
GRAHAM, Carolyn (B.A., H. Sophie Newcomb, 1944) G.H. 

7821 Freret Street, New Orleans 18, La. 
HOVEY, Sarah Edith (A.B., Reed, 1944) D 

c/o Dr. H. Comfort, 5 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 
(833 - 34th Avenue, N., Seattle 2, Wash.) 
KNIGHT, Bernice Eva (B.A., Colby, 1944) G.H. 

County Road, Westbrook, Maine 
LITCHMAN, Jean Marx (A.B., University of Washington, 1943) G.H. 

408 E. 50th Street, Seattle 5, Wash. 
POHL, Claudine Blanche (A.B., Oberlin, 1944) G.H. 

215 W. 83rd Street, New York 24, N. Y. 
RUSSELL, Florence O. (A.B., Scripps, 1944) G.H. 

1811 El Encanto Road, Santa Barbara, Calif. 
SHORTER, Fred Claiborne (A.B., Reed, 1944) IF 

3208 Franklin Avenue, Seattle 2, Wash. 
WALTEN, Constance (B.A., Vassar, 1944) G.H. 

6318 Mossway, Baltimore 12, Md. 
WILHELM, Frederick Oscar (B.A., Wesleyan, 1944) 23 F 

Box 35, North Granby, Conn. 
WOLTER, Rebecca Sturtevant (B.A., Carleton, 1943) G.H. 

75 W. Division Street, Fond du Lac, Wis. 
WYLIE, Anne Stiles (Mrs. Laurence W.) (B.S., Simmons. 1943) G.H. 

8 College Lane, Haverford, Pa. 



102 Haverford College 

FACULTY AND STAFF 

Residence Telephone 

Name (Haverford, unless (Ardmore, unless 

otherwise noted) otherwise noted) 

Allendoerfer, Carl B., 750 Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr 

(Founders, Center West) B.M. 2568-J 

AsENSio, Manuel J., 2 College Lane (Founders, West) 4163 

Beard, Mabel S., Infirmary, Haverford College (Infirmary) 3036 

Beattv, Mrs. Ethel E., Founders Hall, Haverford College 

(Founders, Dining Room) 9533 

Benham, Thomas A., 3 College Lane (Sharpless 14) 6044 

Brinton, Howard H., Plushmill Road, Wallingford Media 4057 

Cadbury, William E., Jr., 791 College Avenue (Chem. Lab. 22) 0203-W 

Caselli, Aldo, Merion Hall, Haverford College (Roberts, 1st fl.) 5562 

Chandler, Charles L., Government House (Library 2) 

Comfort, Howard, 5 College Circle (Sharpless 40) 3732 

Comfort, William W., South Walton Road 0455. 

Cooper, Bennett S., 521 Panmure Road (Founders, East) 3254-M 

Docherty, William, Jr., 747 Church Lane, Yeadon (Gymnasium) 
Drake, Thomas E., 702 Pennstone Road, Bryn Mawr 

(Library, Treasure Room) B.M. 1534 

Dunn, Emmett R., 748 Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr (Sharpless 39) B.M. 2753 

Evans, Arlington, 324 Boulevard, Brookline, Upper Darby 

(Gymnasium) Hilltop 2043 

Evans, Francis Cope, 1 College Lane (Sharpless 32) 4049-W 

Fetter, Frank W.** (Whitall 9) 

FitzGerald, Alan S., Warick Road and Cotswold Lane, Wynnewood 

(Sharpless 9) 1404 

Flight, John W.,* 753 College Avenue (Sharpless 42) 4409-W 

Foss, Martin, la College Lane (Library 49) 1599 

Green, Louis C.,** 791 College Avenue (Observatory) 4409-J 

Haddleton, Alfred W., 29 Tenmore Road (Gymnasium) B.M. 1235-W 

Henry, Howard K., 1464 Drayton Lane, Penn Wynne (Sharpless 31) 3913-J 

Herndon, John G., 1 College Lane (Library 2) 0364 

Hetzel, Theodore B.,** 768 College Avenue (Hilles, 2nd fl.) 4393-W 

HoAG, Gilbert T., Woodside, Haverford College (Roberts, 2nd fl.) 1402-W 

Holmes, Clayton W., 720 Millbrook Lane (Hilles, 1st fl.) 4269-W 

Jones, Rufus M., 2 College Circle 2777 

Jones, Thomas O.** (Chem. Lab. 6) 

Kelly, John A., 3 College Lane (Whitall 11) 4160 

Lester, John A., Jr. (Government House) 

LocKwooD, Dean P., 6 College Circle (Library) 1402-J 

LuNT, William E., 5 College Lane (Whitall 10) 1507-W 

Macintosh, Archibald, 3 College Circle (Roberts, 2nd fl.) 0961 

Meldrum, William B., 747 College Avenue (Chem. Lab. 10) 0881 -J 

Oakley, Cletus O., Featherbed Lane (Founders, Center East) 3109-W 

Palmer, Frederic, Jr., 1 College Lane 6878 

Pepinsky, Abraham, 7 College Lane (Sharpless 21) 5324 

Pfund, Harry W., 624 Overhill Road, Ardmore (Whitall 8) 5532 

Post, Amy L., C-3 Dreycott Apts. (Library 28) 1643-M 

Post, L. Arnold, 9 College Lane (Library 51) 0258-M 

PuRNELL, Theodore L., 304 Cornell Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa Swarth. 0157-M 

Randall, Roy E. (Gymnasium) 

Rantz, J. Otto, 2122 Chestnut Avenue, Ardmore (Hilles, Lab. fl.) 

Reid, Legh W., Merion Hall, Haverford College 1742 

Rittenhouse, Leon H., 6 College Lane 5522 

Sargent, Ralph M., 4 College Circle (Whitall 7) 3339 

Snyder, Edward D.,** 36 Railroad Avenue (Whitall 12) 0712 

Spaeth, J. Duncan, Upper Gulph Road, Wayne (Whitall 14) Wayne 2244 

Steere, Douglas V., 739 College Avenue (Whitall 3) 0162 

Stinnes, Edmund H., 751 Millbrook Lane 6759 



Directory 103 

Residence Telephone 

Name (Haverford, unless (Ardmore, unless 

otherwise noted) otherwise noted) 

Sutton, Richard M., 785 College Avenue, facing Walton Road 

(Sharpless 17) 0742-W 

Swan, Alfred, 624 Overhill Road, Ardmore (Union, Music Room) 5532 

Taylor, Dr. Herbert VV., 457 Lancaster Avenue (Infirmary) 2383 

Teaf, Howard M., Jr., 3 College Lane (Whitall 9) 4049-J 

Watson, Frank D., 773 College Avenue (Whitall 6) 2937 

Williamson, A. Jardine,** 4 College Lane 4023 

Wilson, Albert H., 765 College Avenue 1853 

Wyue, Laurence W., Government House, Haverford College 

(Founders, West) 9461 

COLLEGE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

When there is an operator at the switchboard (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, none Sunday) any of the 
oflBces listed below can be reached by calling Ardmore 6400. 
When there is no operator on duty, use the following telephone numbers: 
Ardmore 6400 — Library; Maintenance and Operation OfiRce 
Ardmore 6401 — Dean; Comptroller 
Ardmore 6402 — Hilles Laboratory; Physics Laboratory 
Ardmore 3036 — Infirmary 
Ardmore 3761 — President's OfiBce 

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONES 
The offices of most of the members of the Faculty may be reached by calling 
Ardmore 6400 during the hours when there is an operator at the switchboard. 

•Absent during first semester. 
** Absent during whole academic year. 



104 Haverford College 

COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Unless otherwise noted, all telephones below may be reached 
by calling Ardmore 6400 

Acting President, Archibald Macintosh 
Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 
Alumni Office, Bennett S. Cooper, Secretary 
Assistant to the President, Bennett S. Cooper 

Barclay Hall, North (Pay Station) 9506 

Barclay Hall, Center (Pay Station) 9459 

Barclay Hall, South (Pay Station) 9508 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 
Business Office, Aldo Caselli, Comptroller 
Chemistry Laboratory 
Dean's Office, Gilbert T. Hoag, Dean 
Dietitian, Mrs. Ethel E. Beatty 
Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 

Founders Hall, East (Pay Station) 9460 

Founders Hall, Dormitory (Pay Station) 9533 

French Department Office •: 

Government House, 8 College Lane (Pay Station) 9613 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) 9512 

Gymnasium Office 

Haverford News 4894 

HaverfcJrd Review, Bennett S. Cooper, Managing Editor 
Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering) 
Infirmary, Mabel S. Beard, R.N. 

Kitchen (Pay Station) 9544 

Language House, Manuel J. Asensio, Director (Pay Station) 9428 

Library: D. P. Lockwood, Librarian 

Amy L. Post, Assistant Librarian 

Circulation Desk 

Treasure Room: Thos. E. Drake, Anna B. Hewitt 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) , Rooms 1-12 (Pay Station) 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbridge) , Rooms 13-26 (Pay Station) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) , Rooms 27-38 (Pay Station) 9628 

Maintenance and Operation Office 

Merion Hall 9458 

Observatory 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Power House (Pay Station) 9540 

Radio Room 5042 

Registrar's Office 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Romance Language Department Office 

Sharpless Hall: T. A. Benham, H. Comfort, F. C. Evans, H. K. Hfenry, 

A. Pepinsky, R. M. Sutton 
Whitall Hall: J. W. Flight, J. A. Kelly, H. W. Pfund, E. D. Snyder 



105 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF 
HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

President 

Edward A. Edwards, '08 

Walnut Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Vice-Presiden ts 

James P. Magill, '08 

Scotford Rd., Mt. Airy, Phila., Pa. 

WiLLARD E. Mead, '26 
5800 Walnut St., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Garrett S. Hoag, '23 
131 Glen Rd., Wellesley Farms, Mass. 

Secretary 

Bennett S. Cooper 

Haverford Colleo^e, Haverford, Pa. 

Treasurer 

Walter C. Baker, '32 

Girard Trust Co., Phila., Pa. 



Haverford Club of Philadelphia 
1607 Moravian St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

President George W. Emlen, Jr., '08 

Vice-President Edward A. Edwards, '08 

Secretary Harris G. Haviland, '26 

Treasurer John C. Lober, '27 

New York Haverford Society 

President Geoffroy Bili.o, '25 

30 Broad St.. New York, N. Y. 

Vice-President Oliver W. Melchior, '28 

Junior High School, Scarsdale, \ Y. 

Secretary R. Wilfred Kelsey, '33 

60 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer Herbert F. Taylor, '28 

806 Pelhamdale Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. 



106 Haverford College 

Haverford Society of Maryland 

President Joseph M. Beatty, Jr., '13 

308 Thornhill Rd., Baltimore, Mrl. 

Vice-President Gilbert Henry Moore, '17 

1125 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Secretary Mennis Lawson, '17 

11 E. Lexington St., Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer Howard O. Buffington, Jr., '31 

4805 Belle Ave., Baltimore. Md. 

Haverford Society of Washington 
President Allan B. Fay, '27 

3 Ardmore Circle, Washington 16, D. C. 

Vice-President Thomas Wistar, Jr., '30 

2558 - 36th St., N. W., Washington 7, D. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer Meredith B. Colket, Jr., '35 

4410 Albermarle St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association of Haverford College 

President Gifford K. Wright, '93 

First National Bank Building, Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

Secretary Willard E. Mead, '26 

5800 Walnut St., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Treasurer James M. Houston, '31 

1639 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

Haverford Society of New England 

President Frank M. Eshleman, '00 

40 Broad St., Room 600, Boston, Mass. 

Secretary-Treasurer Elliott W. Brown, '21 

401 Summer St., Boston, Mass. 



INDEX 

PACE 

Academic Council 21 

Accelerated Course 25 

Administration, Officers of 20 

Admission — Advanced Standing 24 

Admission — Examinations 22-24 

Admission — Graduate Students 36 

Admission — Requiriments for 22 

Admission — Veterans 24 

Alumni Associations 105-106 

Art Collection 78 

Astronomy 46-47 

Athletic Fields 68-69 

Autograph Collection, Charles Roberts 78 

Biblical Literature 47-48 

Biology 48^9 

Bryn Mawr College, Cooperation with 30 

Bucky Foundation 79 

Calendar 4-7 

Campus Club 80 

Chemistry 49-51 

Clubs 44-45 

College Entrance Examination Board 23-24 

Committees — Board of Managers 14 

Committees — Faculty 21 

Conflicting Courses 29 

Corporation — Officers of 12 

Corporation — Standing Nominating Committee 12 

Courses of Instruction 46-76 

Curriculum 25-34 

Degrees Awarded in 1944-45 90-91 

Degrees — Bachelor's 36 

Degrees — Master's 36-37 

Delinquent Students 34-35 

Directory 94-104 

Economics 51-53 

Engineering 54-56 

English Language and Literature 56-58 

Examinations for Admission 22-24 

Examinations for the Master's Degree 36 

Expenses 40^1 

Extra Courses 29-30 

Faculty — Members of 15-19 

Faculty — Standing Committees of 21 

Faculty — Residence and Telephone Directory 102-103 

Fees and Special Charges 41-42 

Fellowships — List of 84 

Fellowships — Awarded in 1944-45 91 

Free Electives 28 

French 73-74 

Geography and Geology 58 

German 58-59 

Government 59-61 

107 



108 Haverford College 

PACE 

Grading of Students 34 

Graduate Students 36-37 

Greek 61 

Gymnasium 69 

Health Program 79-80 

History 62 

History of Art 63 

History of Haverford College 8-1 1 

Honor Societies, Membership in 93 

Honor System 43^4 

Honors — Rules for 38-39 

Honors — Awarded in 1944-45 93 

Humanistic Studies 63 

Infirmary 79 

Italian 75 

Latin 63-64 

Lectures 78-79 

Library 77-78 

Limited Electives 26 

Loan Fund 42 

Major Concentration 27-28 

Managers, Board of 13-14 

Mathematics 64-65 

Meeting, Friends 9 

Monthly Payments of College Bills 41 

Music 66-67 

Observatory 46 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 44 

Philosophy 67-68 

Physical Education 68-69 

Physics 70-72 

Placement Bureau 42 

Prizes— List of 84-89 

Prizes— Awarded in 1944-45 91-92 

Program of Courses 29 

Professions, Preparation for 30-34 

Psychology 72 

Publications, Official 80 

Reconstruction and Relief, Graduate Training in 76 

Required Courses 25-26 

Romance Languages 73-75 

Rooms 40 

Scholarships— List of 80-83 

Scholarships — Awarded in 1944-45 91-92 

Sociology 75-76 

Societies and Organizations 44-45 

Spanish 74 

Student Directory 94-101 

Student Government 43-44 

Student Publications 45 

Swarthmore College, Cooperation with 30 

Telephone Directory 104 

Tuition 40-41 

Veterans, Admission of 24 




. Founder! Hall 

. Barclay Hall 

. Boberti Hall 

■ Harerford TJnlon 

. Lloyd HaU 

. Servants Dormitory 

. WhltaUHall 

. Cbase Hall 

. Observatory 

. Morrli In&rmary 

Mary Nenlin Smith Memorial 

Garden 

The Library 

Lyman Beecher Hall Clicmlitry 

Laboratory 

The Oymnaslum 

Isaac Sharpless Hall (Archeology. 

Biology and Phyilca) 

Cricket Pavilion 

Power House 

Walter B. Smith Grand Stand 

Farm Buildings 

Government Houie 

Merlon Hall 

Merlon Annex 

Strawbrldga Gateway 

Edward B. Caoklln Memorial 
Gateway 

Class of 1906 Gateway 
Class of 1912 Gateway 
George Smith Bard Gateway 
Hllles Laboratory of Applied 
Science (Engineering) 



Kelly. 



30. Class of 1905 Gateway 

101. Messrs. F. C. Evans. Foss, 
Hemdon. and Palmer 

102. Language House, Mr. and Mrs. 
Asenslo 

1U8. Messrs. Benham, 
and Teaf 

104. Mr. Williamson 

105. Mr. Lunt 

106. Mr. BIttenlicuse 

107. Mr. Peplnsky 

108. Government House, Mr. Wylte 

109. Mr. Post 
110. 

111. Mr. R. M. Jones 

112. Mr. Macintosh 

113. Mr. Sargent 

114. Mr. H. Comfort 

115. Mr. Lockwood 

116. Mr. Hoag 

117. President-Emeritus Comfort 

118. Mr. Beld and Mr. Caselli 

119. Mr. Snyder 

120. Messrs. Cadbury and Green 

121. Mr. Sutton 

122. Mr. Watson 

123. Mr. Wilson 

125. Mr. Flight 

126. Mr. Meldrum 

127. Mr. Steere 
129. Mr. Oaltley 
ISO.Selence House 




u 



IIB[ 




Reports of 

PRESIDENT AND 

ACTING PRESIDENT 

1943-44 

1944-45 




FEBRUARY 
1946 



VOLUME XLiV 



NUMBER FOUR 



Issued October, November, December and February by 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 

Entered as Second Class matter, November 2, 1944 at the Post 
Office at Haverford, Pa. under the act of August 24, 1912. 



HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



Reports of 

PRESIDENT AND 

ACTING PRESIDENT 

1943-44 

1944-45 




HAVERFORD -PENNSYLVANIA 



* 



1943 ' 1944 



— (.~l— V— V— I— V— i— V— v.— C--V~V— V— i~V--V~V~«.~V~«.--V— V>-i>-V---V--i~«.->^ 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

Presented at the 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

of Haver ford College 

October 17 y 1944 



M- 



Y last report to the Corporation, presented at the annual meeting 
on October 19, 1943, was revised before publication to cover the 
period to January 1, 1944. In its printed form, including the 
Librarian's Report, that of the Curator of the Quakeriana Collection and 
the current list of faculty publications, this revised statement has been made 
available to all present here today. If there is no objection, the same pro- 
cedure — making the final report cover the calendar year — will be followed 
this year and, I anticipate, for the duration of the accelerated program. 

Since January 3, 1943, Haverford College has been in continuous opera- 
tion. As the institution does not close during the Summer, the traditional 
Fall opening no longer possesses the special significance of normal times. 
More Freshmen entered Haverford in July than in September, and the 
entrants next February will probably be nearly as numerous as the Septem- 
ber group. The calendar year at least survives the pressures and strains of 
total war, and adaptation of the President's report to that period is the more 
logical since the College fiscal and academic years do not in any case 
coincide. 

Some regret has been expressed that this procedure prevents combination 
of the President's and Treasurer's Reports in a single volume, as in the past. 
Off the record, may I point to one advantage in this separation. To achieve 
a balanced budget, for the current fiscal year, it will be necessary to obtain 
sizeable contributions applicable to current expenses. The President's report 
will be utilized in that connection. Its influence to this end would be vitiated 
if attached to a financial statement showing a small operating surplus, and a 
substantial increase in invested funds, for the past fiscal year. 

One notable advantage in the present change of procedure is that it per- 
mits circulation of the present ad interim report, as presented to the 

one} 



Corporation, to all members of the faculty, thus insuring that any errors of 
omission or commission in the preparation can be rectified before the report 
is printed in definitive form. This is important not only to insure complete 
historical accuracy but also because it recognizes the fact that Haverford is 
becoming ever more pronouncedly a truly cooperative undertaking, with the 
faculty and also the student body carrying an increasing amount of adminis- 
trative responsibility. The war has done much to force this development, 
but it also coincides with my personal interpretation of the nature of execu' 
tive function in a democratic organization. 

THE ISSUE OF ACCELERATION 

It should not be inferred, however, that placing the President's report on 
a calendar year basis implies any indorsement of acceleration as other than 
an emergency undertaking. While the experience has taught us many 
valuable lessons, the balance of faculty, student and administrative opinion 
is now probably unitedly against continuing year-round instruction as 
normal procedure. The Summer just past marked our third consecutive 
Summer Term and brought definite, if sometimes intangible, evidence of 
excessive strain. Any plebiscite at the College would now, I believe, show 
a strong majority against the principle of acceleration. 

Nevertheless I cannot feel confident that campus opinion is going to 
determine the long-range outcome in this matter. In the first place, accelera- 
tion must certainly be continued for the duration of the war, as to eliminate 
it would be to deny a precious college term to many boys approaching draft 
age. My own expectation is that this factor alone will necessitate Summer 
Terms at Haverford in 1945 and 1946. 

In the second place, our students returning from military and other 
wartime service will undoubtedly demand an accelerated program for at 
least a year or two after the close of the war. Many of these men will have 
been away from college for three years or more and will be long past the 
normal graduating age. They will be anxious to secure their degrees and 
get into desirable employment with as httle further delay as possible. To 
meet this situation an accelerated program presumably will have to be con- 
tinued for perhaps two years after the close of the major demobilization 
period, indicating Summer Terms in both 1947 and 1948. 

Still a third important consideration is the position the professional schools, 
especially those of medicine, will eventually take on the extent of prerequisite 
college training. If the provision that only three years of undergraduate 
work are necessary for entrance to medical school is maintained, there will 
obviously be a demand that the college degree be obtainable in those three 

[two 



years. This would mean either permanent acceleration for premedical 
students, or a separate degree in their case, or a substantial lowering of the 
present degree requirements. 

In this connection the very real possibility of a continuation of com- 
pulsory military training after the war must be envisaged. Such a develop- 
ment would of course have a profound influence on all four-year colleges, 
especially those which because of their religious background would find it 
difficult to cooperate with the War Department in the far-reaching extension 
of the R.O.T.C. system now being considered. The effect of permanent 
conscription, moreover, would be most pronounced on the pre-professional 
students who have long constituted a large proportion of Haverford under- 
graduates. Many premedical and pre-law students, if required to give a 
year after high school to military training, would simply not be able to afford 
four years of college and three years of post-graduate work, plus internship 
or law clerk work, before becoming self-supporting. The strain of the year 
commanded by the Government would have to be taken up somehow and 
the only slack apparent is in the leisurely four-year college curriculum. 

Finally, there is the question of the post-war financial position of the 
bourgeoisie which at present constitutes the main reservoir of Haverford 
students. The inflationary policy of deficit financing, now firmly established, 
is not promising for the so-called Middle Class. Many of its members may 
in the future be unable to underwrite four years of college for their sons 
and daughters. 

In short, the issue of acceleration is one which will not be decided by 
faculty, administrative or student preference. It will be determined by 
factors the weight and incidence of which arc not yet fully discernible. 

POST-WAR PLANNING 

While the same general conclusion is applicable to other questions relat- 
ing to the period after the war, we are not using this as an excuse for a policy 
of laissez-faire. A faculty Post-War Planning Committee, under the chair- 
manship of Dr. Ralph Sargent, was established in November, 1943, has 
divided into sub-committees the better to explore its wide field of inquiry, 
and has already accomplished a great deal of valuable preliminary work. 
This committee is empowered to examine the way other colleges are con- 
fronting the same problem and a pleasant tribute to the reputation of 
Haverford is found in the number of visits we have had from delegates 
of institutions anxious to ascertain our intentions for the period after the 
war. 

The conclusions as to the desirable procedure for Haverford, in a matter 

three] 



of such great importance to the future of the College, will of course not be 
made by the faculty and administration alone. At my request the Board 
of Managers, on January 21, 1944, appointed a special committee, intended 
to be broadly representative of the Alumni as well as the Management, 
which in due course will consult with the faculty Post-War Planning Com- 
mittee. The first step, however, is for the latter to agree on specific 
recommendations and to secure faculty approval for these. Thereafter the 
committee of the Board of Managers will be called into active collaboration, 
both to review proposals which seem desirable from the campus viewpoint 
and to make such additional suggestions as may be deemed appropriate. It 
should be noted that student opinion is being actively sought, and carefully 
considered, in the preliminary work of the faculty committee. 

On one phase of its inquiry — that pertaining to the instruction of men 
returning to college after discharge from the Armed Services and C.P.S. 
camps — the faculty Planning Committee has already made important recom- 
mendations which have been examined by the Academic Council and are 
now about to be passed on by the faculty as a body. The tenor of these 
recommendations is that ex-service men (military or civilian) should in 
general conform to the college curriculum, rather than vice versa, and that 
every effort should be made to unify, rather than differentiate between, the 
normal and the post-service undergraduate. 

It is emphasized, however, that the application of overall regulations to 
ex-service students must make allowance for individual circumstance, and 
that latitude should be exercized in such matters as time of admission, selec 
tion of courses and discipHnary requirements. Success could not be 
anticipated from any attempt to treat as identical cases the man of 22 who 
has commanded a ship or military unit, and the youth of 17 fresh from 
high school, even though both will in many cases be on the same academic 
footing. 

STUDENT SELF-GOVERNMENT 

The issue of arbitrary regulations for ex-service students is connected 
with that of the campus code, inherited from an easier period, for normal 
undergraduates. In order to unify the two groraps successfully it would 
seem desirable to expand the area of self-government for the latter, so far 
as is clearly warranted. There are many indications that this development 
would prove wise in practice, in addition to being sound in theory. 

During the past Summer a very interesting movement in favor of exten- 
sion of the Honor System developed spontaneously among the civilian 
student body. It was asserted, not without logic, that since Havcrford 
undergraduates for years have been successfully on their honor in respect 

[folr 



to examinations, the same principle might properly be extended to the con- 
duct of campus life in general. The reasoning was fortified by justified 
observation that certain existing rules are in effect unenforceable by the 
college administration yet are not really under the alternative control of the 
Students' Association. It was asked whether it is really desirable to continue 
a pretense that rules now subject to violation are scrupulously observed — 
a question which I have frequently directed to myself with unsatisfactory 
results. 

In meetings with the officers of the Students' Council, and with the 
civilian student body as a whole, I pointed out that the Honor System and 
Student Self-Government are two sides of the same picture and that exten- 
sion of the scope of the former would necessarily involve increase in the 
responsibility of the latter. In other words, any disciplinary responsibility 
ceded by the College administration, which carries it in loco parentis, must 
be specifically accepted and continuously exercised by the Students' Associa- 
tion as such. Otherwise we would risk the development of student anarchy 
rather than the promotion of student self-government, in which I strongly 
believe, both in principle and as a definite and important part of under- 
graduate education. 

The student leadership was quick to appreciate the point and towards 
the end of the Summer Term presented a definite program, designed to 
enlarge the area of student self-government in all matters of student con- 
duct, envisaging the appointment of a joint Administration-Faculty- Student 
Guidance Committee to direct its operation, and accepting for the Students' 
Council responsibility, as a court of first instance, for the enforcement of 
regulations agreed upon. This program, with certain minor modifications, 
meets with my full approval as an experiment, subject to reconsideration, 
and is now before the Board of Mangers for decision on policy grounds. 

In one important respect, and with the knowledge of the Board, the 
enlarged Honor System is already in operation. No regular seats are this 
semester allotted for Fifth Day Meeting, now held at the normal morning 
hour, and no roll of attendance is taken. Attendance, however, is still 
expected of every student and he is on his honor to report absences above 
the allowance to the Dean's office. The result of this innovation, to date, 
has been an obvious improvement in the psychology and spirit of the Meet- 
ing, further advanced by the practice of faculty attenders in taking seats 
on the benches originally reserved entirely for undergraduates. It is hoped 
that more members of the Board of Managers will, in the months ahead, 
attend on the schedule suggested to them or otherwise, themselves sitting 
among and identifying their communion with that of the students, if that is 
their desire. It will be a great gain for the College community if the 

five] 



spiritual experience of Fifth Day Meeting is heightened by subordination of 
the disciphnary or penal aspect and success in this direction now seems 
probable. 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

Haverford is fortunate not only in the quality but also in the quantity of 
its present civilan enrollment. The present Semester started with a total of 
125 regular undergraduates as compared with 127 at this time last year. 
While under forty per cent of normal, this is a far better showing than that 
of most small men's colleges, where a civilian enrollment less than twenty per 
cent of normal is now customary. On classification by terms, which neces' 
sarily replaces the shattered class divisions, the comparison with a year ago 
is as follows: 



Term 


Fall Semester, 1944 


Fall Semester, 1943 


VIII 


i 


3 


VII 


n 


10 


VI 


4 


10 


V 


12 


16 


IV 


10 


19 


III 


9 


14 


II 


38 


33 


I 


36 


22 



Totals 125 127 

From the above tabulation it is clear that while the wartime attrition of 
older students increases, the number who think it worth while to endeavor 
to secure at least a year of college training is also gaining. Undoubtedly this 
last is partly due to the popular belief that the war, at least in Europe, is 
now entering its final stage and one can only hope that events will justify 
that opinion. The result, at Haverford, is that what would normally be our 
Freshman Class is not far below standard in size, but constitutes almost 60 
per cent of the entire student body. 

It may well be asked whether this preponderance of those who were so 
recently schoolboys does not constitute a strong argument against extension 
of the Honor System at the present time. I have given the point careful 
consideration and believe that the answer is in the negative. Under present 
conditions boys of 17 have a maturity beyond their years. They are almost 
pitifully eager to utilize to the best advantage such college time as is avail' 
able to them before they reach draft age. Much more than the course of 
study has been accelerated as a result of the war and the attitude of the 
second-term student now is comparable to that of the upper classman in the 

[six 



pre-war period. A considerable leaven of exempted older students remains 
to us and this is already being strengthened by the return of war veterans, 
discharged after hospitahzation, who are accustomed both to accept and to 
impose discipline. Finally, there is the desirability of making student self- 
government more complete and effective before that development is 
demanded as of right by a flood of returning ex-service students who will 
be men and who will expect to be regarded as such. 

The civilian student body this year represents 23 States, as compared with 
20 last year and 29 two years ago. Undergraduates who are members of 
the Society of Friends number 14, or 11.2 per cent of the total. A com- 
parative table of the course registrations for civilia n students follows, carried 
back through 1939, the last year before passage of the Selective Service Law. 
The sharp recovery, against wartime trends, in English and Music is 
especially interesting. Particular emphasis is being placed on the latter 
subject, partly as an offset to the consolidation of our instruction in Art 
with that of Bryn Mawr College. Courses taken by Haverford under- 
graduates at this sister institution, under the Three College Cooperative 
Program, are not included in this table: — 
Department Registrations 

1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 

Art 1 3 14 19 17 

Astronomy 1 15 22 43 23 

Biblical Lit 12 3 12 18 27 18 

Biology 32 46 66 81 92 77 

Chemistry 54 78 228 224 180 156 

Economics 22 27 124 147 155 169 

Engineering 15 25 95 74 62 48 

English 101 77 195 224 187 250 

French 26 25 36 64 93 105 

German 59 52 117 100 111 122 

Government 36 34 94 100 121 71 

Greek 7 6 24 18 12 18 

History 60 45 98 143 156 155 

Italian 4 1 8 2 

Latin 4 5 30 24 29 36 

Mathematics 50 59 162 158 121 130 

Music 14 5 31 18 23 10 

Philosophy 

(incl. Psychology) 37 35 86 99 95 94 

Physics 35 58 120 77 83 55 

Sociology 14 28 43 72 82 60 

Spanish 20 21 65 48 12 27 

seven] 



THE MILITARY UNITS 

While the civilian enrollment remains practically identical with that of a 
year ago there has been virtual elimination of our military students, of whom 
we had 373 at the end of September, 1943, divided into 175 Pre-Meteor- 
ology trainees and 198 in the A.S.T.P. units, 140 of these last in Area and 
Language and 58 in Basic Engineering. In December, 1943, when a second 
group of Basics arrived, our military enrollment reached its maximum, 397 
at the highest. This figure, however, was substantially cut by the gradua- 
tion, on February 12, 1944, of the 149 P-M trainees who successfully 
completed their scheduled one-year course at Haverford. 

During March, in anticipation of the invasion of France and with little 
preliminary notice to the participating institutions, the entire A.S.T. program 
was sharply curtailed, resulting first in the complete elimination of the 
Basic group and then in the liquidation of Area and Language training at 
all but a few large universities. The effect of this sharp contraction at 
Haverford was to some extent offset by the arrival in March of a small Pre- 
Medical unit of 40 men, this part of the A.S.T.P. being continued. 

In September, however, the Pre-Medical unit in turn was cut as a result 
of the failure of Congress to appropriate for Pre-Dental trainees, who com- 
posed about one-third of our Pre- Professional contingent. In consequence 
we started the present academic year with only 26 Army students on the 
campus, as opposed to 373 a year ago. This abbreviated Pre-Medical unit, 
containing some excellent professional material, will be with us until the 
expiration of its nine-month course on December 2. Informal graduation 
exercises will be held at a dinner in the Common Room the evening of 
November 30, at which Colonel Francis M. Fitts, U.S.A.M.C, Dr. Mel- 
drum, as Academic Director of this Unit, Captain Ralph Henry, as its 
Commandant, two of the trainees and myself will speak briefly. Members 
of the Board of Managers would be most welcome guests at this dinner, if 
they will notify my office of intention to attend. 

The heavy and sudden contraction of the Army training program 
naturally raised serious administrative and financial problems. The 
immediate confusion can be more easily imagined than described. As 
quickly as compatible with obligations there was demobili2;ation of the 
temporary faculty carefully gathered to assist our regular staff in the three 
curricula of Basic Engineering, German and Italian area study. Dining 
room, janitorial and grounds employes were curtailed in proportion. 
Merion Hall and Annex, and later Science House on Panmure Road, were 
closed and the civilian students concentrated in Lloyd Hall. Such other 
economies as seemed appropriate were instituted. 

Administrative difficulties, including measures to protect the budget, were 

[eight 



augmented by uncertainty as to whether or not a "Reservist" unit, approved 
by the Board of Managers and authorized for us by the War Department, 
would actually arrive and if so whether it would be desirable on balance to 
accept two hundred of these 17 -year-old students, not actually in but 
destined for the Army. The budget for the current fiscal year, as drafted 
in May, assumed the advent of this unit. During the early Summer both 
the uncertainty of allocation and the scholastic deterioration of the cur- 
riculum for this group became more pronounced. In the middle of August, 
following inquiries which I made on several visits both to Third Service 
Command headquarters in Baltimore and to the A.S.T.P. executive in the 
Pentagon Building, this type of training was by mutual consent eliminated 
for Haverford. As a result an estimated income of $216,420 was cut from 
the 1944-45 budget. 

Three alternative possibilities for complete utilization of our physical 
facilities and faculty services were considered during the difficult Summer 
months. The first of these was for extension courses with German prisoners 
of war at Fort Dix. The second was for rehabilitation, but post-hospitali- 
zation, training on the campus of Air Force casualties, for the most part 
shot down or seriously burned in action. 

The third possibility, a civilian undertaking, was for In-Service training 
for Border Inspectors of the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the 
Department of Justice. Partly because of its intrinsic desirability, partly 
because it was urged on us more strongly than the other activities, partly 
because it involved the fewest complications, I agreed, after correspondence 
with the Chairman of the Board of Managers, to take the I.N.S. group 
which was ready to start a month of training on September 20. This 
executive action was given retroactive approval by the Board at its meeting 
on September 22 and the unit, composed of 26 men and 14 women, are now 
completing their month of residence at Haverford, the former being housed 
in South, the latter in North Barclay, with the Pre-Medical unit, now 
concentrated in Center Barclay, in between. Agreement has now been 
made to extend the reaUzation of our facilities for this purpose to a second 
group of I.N.S. trainees, which will be in residence here from November 8 
to December 7. 

It may be mentioned that in preparing North and South Barclay for the 
installation of this group I decided to furnish attractively for reception and 
general social purposes one room on the ground floor of each dormitory. 
These rooms will be maintained as now equipped when Barclay reverts to 
normal student occupancy. By contrast with other colleges of our class 
Haverford has long been deficient in the provision of general social accom- 
modations, a factor not without influence in the whole issue of "girls in 
dormitories". 

nine] 



RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION UNIT 

The R. and R. Unit, now opening its second year, has been very success- 
fully integrated with the College establishment, an accomplishment for 
which Dr. Douglas Steere, Director of the unit, deserves particular credit. 
It should be realized that these graduate students, in addition to their 
specialized work, attend many of our normal courses — in Economics, French, 
German, Philosophy and Spanish, thereby considerably enlarging the 
registration totals as listed in the table on page 5. Difficulties in coordin- 
ating the Quarter System of R. and R. with' the Semester System to which 
the regular College still adheres have somehow been overcome, as also in 
the case of electives allowed the Pre-Medical students who are on still a 
third calendar. 

Of the 22 R. and R. members who started their post-graduate training at 
Haverford a year ago, 17, of whom all but one are women, are now back 
to complete their fifth and last quarter. Their Summer was spent in 
approved field work projects, five directing A.F.S.C. work camps, five others 
taking staff posts at institutions for delinquent women, two working at a 
Polish Refugee Camp in Mexico, one with U.N.R.R.A. and the others in 
equally significant activities. The incoming group is composed of 20 women 
and 5 men, of whom the former are housed in Government House, with 
Dr. and Mrs. Wylie as house directors. The original unit is again located 
in Language House, with Mr. and Mrs. Asensio in charge. 

Of the members of the new unit 4 come from the Pacific Coast, 4 from 
the South, 7 from the Middle West and 10 from the East, a geographical 
dispersion which recalls that all members of the first I.N.S. unit are 
from west of the Mississippi. The greater catholicity of viewpoint given 
Haverford by the wide geographical distribution of those now in residence 
on the campus is welcome, as is the broader national reputation which 
results. 

The R. and R. girls have, on the whole, merged so satisfactorily into 
campus life, and contributed so much to the College, as to justify the sug- 
gestion that this graduate unit might desirably be maintained as a 
permanency, the more so because the need for relief workers will become 
greater, not less, with military demobilization. I am inclined to favor this 
outcome, provided another residential house can be allocated to the unit 
when Language House and Government House revert 100 per cent to the 
distinctive and valuable undergraduate purposes for which they were 
created. 

[ten 



FINANCIAL OUTLOOK 

The College attendance at the present time, exclusive of E.S.M.W.T. 
enrollment, is thus composed of 125 Civilian Undergraduates; 42 Graduate 
Students (R. and R.); 26 Army Pre-Medical and 40 I.N.S. In Service 
trainees, making a total of 233 as against 522 at this time last year and a 
normal of 350. By the new year, however, the total will certainly sink to 
under 200 and possibly to under 150. 

This explains why the financial outlook is grim, even though the operating 
surplus for the past three years has fortunately wiped out most of the 
accumulated debt from earlier operating deficits. The larger part of the 
loss of anticipated revenue from a Reservist Unit, to which is added income 
lost by the premature elimination of our Army PrcDental students, has 
been covered by economies already made. Nevertheless, as I reported to 
the Board of Managers on September 15, the anticipated deficit for the 
current fiscal year stands at $98,185.30 and no large proportion of this can 
be safely reduced by further curtailments. The plan for a contributory 
pension system for non- faculty employes, as recommended in my last year's 
report and on which Albert Linton and others had done much careful pre 
paratory work, is now necessarily postponed, as are other desirable 
expenditures. As yet I have not advocated any salary cuts and greatly 
hope this can be avoided, even though faculty and administrative salaries 
on the relatively generous Haverford scale constitute almost exactly half 
of our expenditure commitments for the current fiscal year. But the only 
alternative to salary cuts is to raise substantial new revenues and the 
question here is: How? 

Study of the Treasurer's Report will show that additions to the College 
endowment for the past fiscal year amounted to $82,072.47 while donations 
for current purposes totaled approximately $20,000, including a generous 
gift of stock which the donor expects the College to sell for current use. 
This 4 to 1 disproportion between donations for capital account and for 
current outlay results from one large bequest. Nevertheless the ratio 
emphasizes the desirability of a change of emphasis for the duration of the 
emergency period. Instead of favoring further endowment increase, 
supporters of the College should as a temporary policy cooperate in tiding 
it over the difficulties of the wartime period. I shall be frank to say that, 
almost three years after Pearl Harbor, my ingenuity in obtaining current 
revenues from sources other than donations is nearly exhausted. 

This thinking is fortified by the substantial success of the ''Library 
Associates", launched just a year ago. No reflection on any individual is 
involved in saying that a lethargic inertia, easily and frequently confused 

eleven} 



with the vital tradition of Haverford, must be held responsible for the 
fact that we did not take this step until years after similar action had proved 
successful at other colleges. As the Librarian shows in his report, and 
largely as a result of his effort, a single year of experience has now done 
much to compensate for earlier inactivity. The Associates have greatly 
increased community interest in our excellent Library, and have stimulated 
a flow of very valuable presentations. Beyond this the organization 
brought in, during the last fiscal year, membership fees and cash contri- 
butions of $1,004 from no less than 163 separate famiHes and individuals, 
many of whose names appear for the first time on our list of donors. The 
Library Associates, during the current year, might well be urged to assist 
in sustaining, not merely embellishing, an organ of the College which 
under its present able direction has demonstrated much more than intra- 
mural value. 

Following the same line of reasoning a step further, it seems high time 
that our Alumni Association should be encouraged to establish, at least for 
the duration of the emergency, a sustaining fund of which all receipts would 
go towards meeting the current expenditure of the College during the year 
in which they are raised. In this manner Earlham College, with a smaller 
and poorer alumni body than Haverford, has already this year raised over 
$12,000 towards meeting its current budgetary strain. Connecticut Wes- 
leyan, a more comparable case, during the academic year 1943-44 raised 
over $70,000 in 2548 separate contributions from its well-organi2;ed Alumni. 
I know of no college other than Haverford which is now failing to mobilize 
the loyalty of its Alumni for current needs. Yet what we could do in this 
direction is indicated by the fact that a single active class — that of 1917 — 
on a single solicitation this year contributed $565 to the Scholarship Fund 
of that class. At the moment, however, our urgent need is not more scholar- 
ships, or more capital accumulation of any kind. It is unallocated current 
income to maintain faculty salaries and preserve the standing, prestige and 
accomplishment of Haverford as a going concern. 

Convinced both of the desirability and necessity of an Alumni Sustaining 
Fund, contributions to which will be deductible for income tax purposes, I 
suggested its inauguration at an executive committee meeting of the Alumni 
Association on September 27. The step would involve dropping the AU- 
Haverford Plan for the duration, but with intercollegiate athletic contests 
now sharply curtailed, and travel difficult, the advantages of that Plan are 
much contracted. The executive committee responded favorably to my 
suggestions and steps looking towards the formal establishment of the 
Sustaining Fund are now being taken. 

May I urge all Haverford Alumni present today actively to throw their 
[twelve 



weight behind an undertaking which should simultaneously stimulate loyalty 
to Haverford in its time of need and also materially assist solution of the 
current budgetary problem. Heretofore, in spite of the protracted strains 
of war, I have made no general appeal for Alumni financial support. 
Through the medium of this report I do so now. I would like to see the flow 
of checks start tomorrow, payable to Haverford College. Whether sent in 
the first instance to me, to the Alumni Association, or to Henry Scattergood 
as Treasurer, they will be duly credited to the individual alumnus, to his 
class and to the Alumni Sustaining Fund of 1944-45. 

THE COLLEGE AND THE COMMUNITY 

The service of the College to the Community, in ways other than those 
already indicated, has continued to be pronounced during the period under 
review. The E.S.M.W.T. program, which has now completed its third 
year of operation on the campus, is of perhaps particular interest as a 
practical form of adult education in which our share entitles us to modest 
satisfaction. 

During the first year of these evening classes, where the instruction is 
given almost entirely by Haverford faculty or alumni, the total enrollment 
was 98. In 1942-43 it increased to 148 and last year mounted to 180, even 
though the effect of the draft has been increasingly to Hmit those enrolled to 
women and older men. Most of the students live close to the College but 
work in various parts of the Philadelphia area, as draftsmen, designers, tool- 
makers, electricians, chemists, engineers, researchers and inspectors. 

Many letters of appreciation regarding the courses have been received. 
The Vice-President of the Autocar Company, from which we have had some 
60 worker-students, says that: "The individuals who have taken these 
courses have benefited to an extent which has made them definitely more 
valuable to the Company". After completing a course a young woman 
writes us: "I miss my school evenings at Haverford College. I wish it were 
Co-ed. I would be the first girl to register". 

It should be emphasized that much E.S.M.W.T. instruction is easily of 
college grade and that some of the students are college-trained. One 
member of the Electronics Course is the Chief Research Engineer of a very 
important company and has brought to the campus for solution an 
industrial research problem of great technical interest. With the retirement 
of Professor L. H. Rittenhouse, who from the outset has served most 
competently as institutional representative for the U. S. Ofiice of Education 
in this important program, its supervision passes to Professor Clayton W. 
Holmes, Acting Chairman of our Department of Engineering. 

thirteen] 



Open to the public last year were the Tuesday morning Collections, 
addressed by a number of important speakers, among whom may be 
mentioned Oswald Garrison Villard, Howard Kershner, Rev. Stephen F. 
Bayne, Jr., Dr. Edward H. Hume, Dr. Duncan Spaeth and Earl G. Harri' 
son. More notable, because speaking as part of a more coordinated program, 
was the series of distinguished Europeans brought to the campus to conduct 
seminars in the R. and R. program, frequently extending to meetings with 
both the A.S.T.P. and regular civilian students. Among these guests were 
Dr. Heinrich Bruening, Wolfgang Stressemann, Robert Ulich, WiHiam 
Sollmann, Father Damasus Winzen (German) ; Professor Halecki, Baron 
de Ropp (Polish) ; Antonin Basch, Joseph Hrdmadka (Czech) ; Hendrik de 
Kaufmann (Danish) ; Valery Tereshtenko (Russian) ; Signe Mikkola 
(Finnish); Halvdan Koht (Norwegian). 

The success of these R. and R. seminars is not unconnected with the 
establishment of the Main Line Forum, of which the opening meeting, with 
Judge Curtis Bok speaking on "Problems of Youth", will be held in Roberts 
Hall this Thursday evening. Much school, church, and civic interest has 
been aroused in this significant community undertaking, addressed to the 
winning of a lasting peace, and great appreciation is due Dr. Edmund H. 
Stinnes, of our Department of Government, whose vision and energy are 
primarily responsible for its initiation. Because of the greater moment of 
these evening public meetings Tuesday Collections, except on call, will not 
be held this semester. 

In mentioning distinguished campus visitors a special acknowledgment 
is due to Dr. John W. Flight who, serving as unofficial chaplain for the 
Pre-Meteorology Unit, last winter brought to the Inter'Faith Vesper 
Services in Roberts Hall an inspiring list of religious leaders, including our 
own Dr. Rufus Jones; Rabbi W. H. Fineshriber; Bishop O. J. Hart; Mother 
Mary Lawrence; Rev. Andrew Mutch and a number of others no less 
celebrated. Extra-curricular undertakings of this character are partly 
responsible for the expressed desire — and formal application — of many of 
our Army students to return to Haverford after discharge. Many of these, 
like our regular students in service, frequently spend part of their precious 
furloughs revisiting the campus. They are welcome for themselves, and as 
substantial evidence that Haverford has won the hearts of the G. L Joes, of 
very varied backgrounds, who in the past two years have experienced its 
influence. Worthy of consideration in this connection is the result of an 
inquiry made in our PrcMedical Unit, showing that 12 of its 26 members, 
who complete their studies here in December, could not have aspired to 
the medical profession except for the financial help afforded by A.S.T.P. 

The Shipley Lecture during the past year took the form of a delightful 
[fourteen 



variety of sketches, before what may with understatement be called an 
overflow audience, by Cornelia Otis Skinner. This was on January 12. 
The Library Lecture was grven by Dr. W. W. Comfort on April 27, with 
"William Penn's Religion and Government" as his subject. Special dis' 
plays of our rich Penn material in the Quakeriana Collection are being made 
during the Tercentenary Celebration, in which many Haverfordians are 
playing an active part. 

One reason for welcoming the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
trainees is that the presence on the campus of these civil servants is more 
stimulating than any text book in developing student appreciation of 
governmental function and operation. Active cooperation of the College 
in governmental undertakings of a public service nature is increasing. The- 
most outstanding example this year has been a survey of the self 'employed 
in Philadelphia, undertaken during April by the R. and R. unit at the 
specific request of the Social Security Board, in order to collect data bearing 
on the possible extension of social insurance to this category of workers. In 
reference to this undertaking John J. Corson, then Director, Bureau of 
Old' Age and Survivors Insurance, for the Social Security Board, wrote on 
May 17: "All the members of our staff who were associated with the survey 
in Philadelphia were impressed with the interest which these young people 
took in the work". 

Threc'ColIege cooperation, between Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarth' 
more, made further substantial progress during the year, which also saw a 
merger, under Haverford direction, of the Bryn Mawr and Haverford 
undergraduate radio stations. Faculty interchange has been intensified as 
a result of wartime conditions. Six Haverford undergraduates are this 
semester taking seven Bryn Mawr courses (Chemistry 3; Psychology 2; 
Economics 1 ; History 1 ) for Haverford credit. In addition three members 
of the R. and R. unit are studying Russian at Bryn Mawr. Dr. Louis C. 
Green, of the Haverford faculty, is now on leave of absence from Haver- 
ford to direct the Department of Physics at Bryn Mawr. 

The Three-College cooperation also proved effective in plans looking 
towards the establishment of an Association of Friends Colleges, and in 
arrangements for financial assistance to discharged C.P.S. men, in both of 
which President Nason of Swarthmore and I worked in close collaboration, 
with each other and with the American Friends Service Committee. Action 
implementing Haverford's part in these developments was taken by the 
Board of Managers at its meeting on September 22. 

During the past year the campus and facilities of the College have been 
made available to many local groups, such as the Boy Scouts of the Main 
Line District; the Main Line Cooperative Association; the Norwegian 

fifteen] 



Seamen's Church; the Main Line Community League Inter-Racial Chorus, 
from all of which grateful and appreciative acknowledgments have been 
received. The College is undoubtedly fulfilling its responsibilities to the 
community as an institution "affected with a public interest". As a result 
we are entitled to claim a larger measure of community support. 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATION 

With one exception, to be noted later, the administrative organization 
of the College, as developed and revised during the past four years, has 
proved both adaptable and efficient for meeting the strains of total war. 

Particularly satisfactory to a responsible executive is the present certainty 
that the institution could continue to function successfully independent of 
the services of any member of the staff, myself included. There is no 
"indispensable man" at Haverford, which is as it should be in a democratic 
organization where the integration of the whole must be regarded as far 
more important than limelight for any individual. A great deal of effort 
has been spent in achieving this integration, not at all by discouraging the 
zealous individual contribution which is so essential to corporate accomplish- 
ment but by ceaselessly encouraging that teamwork and orderly cooperation 
which all athletic coaches, if not all presidents, know to be basic for enduring 
success. 

The outline of administrative organization now seems to me substantially 
complete, and competent to meet the problems of the post'war period as 
it has met those of war. The Academic Council, of which a majority are 
elected by the faculty without any executive advice, should continue to 
serve both as an advisory body for the President and simultaneously as the 
executive organ of the faculty. The Council has proved itself competent to 
supplement and assist, without replacing or duplicating, the work of the 
Standing Committees, which the President continues to appoint. The 
Academic Council, the minutes of which show that my function is primarily 
that of chairman, has accomplished much more than the elimination of any 
risk of that administration vs. faculty antagonism which so seriously hampers 
some colleges. It has also during the wartime period enabled the College 
quickly and smoothly to solve problems which I believe would otherwise 
have been almost insurmountable. 

The elected faculty representatives on the Board of Managers, who are 
also ex officio members of the Academic Council, likewise perform a most 
useful function, much more so than their perhaps excessive modesty at 
Board meetings indicates. The presence of these members, let it be freely 
admitted, is a constant and healthy check on any presidential tendency to 
state a college problem in incomplete or prejudicial terms. And these 

[sixteen 



representatives are in a position to, and are expected to, report their own 
interpretation of Board actions back to the faculty without any presidential 
editing. It may be observed that in their ex officio function as my advisers 
in all matters of regular faculty appointments and promotions, a significant 
development noted in my report a year ago, these faculty representatives 
are not as reticent as they customarily are at Board meetings. 

So far the Board has not seen fit to give the faculty representatives 
appointments on any of its Standing Committees. This is perhaps due to 
my failure to urge a step which I have heretofore regarded as somewhat 
outside my prerogative. Since it is my conviction that such appointments 
would further develop that policy of integration which I deem essential for 
the full success of Haverford, I shall use the medium of this report to urge 
that the faculty representatives on the Board of Managers, like those of the 
alumni, be given responsible committee assignments at the earliest appro- 
priate opportunity. 

Another development to which I am giving serious consideration is the 
appointment of an elected Dean. of the Faculty, who would sit on the 
Academic Council in that capacity, who would preside over all faculty 
meetings, and who would have a particular responsibility to further inter- 
departmental cooperation, to suggest instructional improvements to indi- 
vidual teachers and to advise the President confidentially in regard to weak 
points in our professional accompHshment. It is a part of my duty to inform 
you that Haverford has some academic deficiencies. 

On my recommendation the Alumni Association has this Fall taken the 
somewhat revolutionary step of appointing as Alumni Secretary, for the 
remainder of this academic year, a member of the College administrative 
staff who is not himself a Haverford alumnus. I would like to express my 
appreciation of this very cooperative step and to explain briefly, for the 
benefit of the many alumni to whom this report will be sent in printed form, 
why it is significant. 

If the alumni are to be kept in touch with the College, and encouraged to 
provide assistance where it will be most effective, it will not be enough for 
the President to give an occasional talk at the Haverford Club in Philadel- 
phia, and to make an annual appearance at the formal dinners of the various 
regional groups. Of at least equal significance will be close and continuous 
collaboration between the administration and the campus representative of 
the alumni organization. This day-to-day working cooperation I have 
sought to develop over the past four years, greatly assisted by the advice of 
various Alumni Association executives and their constant disposition to meet 
me at least half-way in every step suggested. 

My belief that a hand-picked young alumnus, just out of college, should 

seventeen] 



hold the alumni secretaryship for a year or two, serving simultaneously as 
director of publicity, managing editor of The Haverford Review and con' 
fidential adviser to the President on undergraduate concerns and problems, 
was early indorsed. Unfortunately the effect of the draft has been such 
that, since Wayne Moseley, none of the very able young men selected has 
been able to hold the Alumni secretaryship for even a single year. Yet in 
spite of this discouraging turnover the theory of having as Alumni Secretary 
one who is also a responsible assistant to the President has proved sound. 
As long as the two masters have the identical objective of Haverford's 
welfare this man can serve them both, incidentally with economy both for 
the Alumni Association and the College. 

This coordination has now been emphasized by the naming as Alumni 
Secretary pro tem of Brinton H. Stone, my assistant and secretary of the 
Academic Council, who is beginning his third year at Haverford, who has 
developed a wide alumni acquaintance and who is draft exempt. Mr. Stone 
has qualifications for the post which tend to outweigh the fact that he is 
a graduate of Johns Hopkins — no offense' is there intended — and this appoint- 
ment augurs well for the efficient development of the Alumni Sustaining 
Fund already referred to in this report. 

The exception to efficient administration which I have mentioned can 
properly, though not with pride, be attributed to the unusual demands and 
complications of detailed accounting to the Government for our outlay in 
behalf of military units. In the test we found that our business office at 
the College was simply not equipped to handle this difficult technical work 
satisfactorily. The revelation of our deficiencies, however, will undoubtedly 
prove of long-range advantage to the College. 

As the difficulties became serious I asked Professor Howard Teaf, last 
Spring, to undertake a thorough examination of our entire business office 
procedure, in cooperation with Henry Scattergood in his capacity as 
Treasurer of the College. Dr. Teai, who was already serving as the 
Coordinator of Military Units, undertook this onerous assignment with his 
customary energy, efficiency and tact. He was assisted by Dr. Aldo 
Caselli, who had first been appointed as an instructor in our Italian 
Language and Area Study Unit and who was kept on after its dissolution 
in part because of his technical proficiency as an accountant. Occasion was 
taken to initiate a number of overdue reforms in our antiquated method, 
or lack of method, in bookkeeping, in taking inventory, in purchasing 
procedures, in keeping records and in other routine but all-important 
business practices. These reforms were for the most part put into operation, 
in the interests of economy and efficiency, at the beginning of the current 
fiscal year. 

[eighteen 



On October 1 these changes were signaUzed by terminating the office 
of Comptroller as such and by separating the functions heretofore directed 
by Mr. Wills, on whom an almost unendurable strain has devolved since 
the beginning of our complicated wartime relations with the Government. 
Mr. Wills is now concentrating on the duties of Registrar, which have been 
enlarged by transfer to him of certain recording functions properly belong' 
ing to that office but heretofore handled by the Dean. Dr. Caselli is serving 
as Bursar, with complete responsibility under me for all College accounting 
and financial operations not handled in the Treasurer's office, or by the 
Finance and Investment Committee of the Board. 

I have also requested Mr. Wills, in cooperation with the Librarian, to 
start the collection and classification of material essential for the eventual 
writing of a second volume of a really definitive History of Haverford 
College, which I think should be designed to cover the period from 1893 to 
1953, supplementing the admirable published record of our first sixty years 
which is still of perennial interest and value. 

IN CONCLUSION 

That research assignment to Mr. Wills is of itself evidence of my com- 
plete confidence in the future of Haverford. The year ahead will be 
difficult, perhaps the more so because, as a result of our earlier efforts, we 
have not suffered in a material sense during the first three years of our 
national participation in the war. Now the pinch has come and it will be 
severe. A prospective deficit of almost $100,000 during the current fiscal 
year is not to be regarded lightly. But I am confident that we shall surmount 
this, as we have surmounted earHer problems. 

It has sometimes seemed to me that Haverford has a certain well'bred 
reluctance to exert itself to its full capacity, whether on the athletic fields, 
in the Library, in the class rooms or in Roberts Hall. This year that 
reluctance must be overcome, cooperatively, by all, not just a few, members 
of our fraternity. It is the testing period. I think every part of our com- 
munity — students, faculty, administrative officers, alumni and managers — 
will rise to the occasioa 

Felix M. Morley, 

President. 



ninlteen] 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN FOR 1943-44 

To the President: 

I submit herewith the Report on the Library for the academic year 
1943-44. 

I 

The chief event of the year was the successful estabHshment of the 
''Library Associates" — the chmax of a long-standing poHcy of community 
service. For many years we have encouraged neighbors to use the Hbrary 
as freely as though they were regular students of the college. After many 
years' experience I can testify that this policy has neither interferred with our 
primary obligation of educating young men and women nor has it opened 
our doors to any greater proportion of undesirable readers than are acci- 
dentally found among our own students. On the positive side, the policy 
has been of great benefit: the good-will of friends and neighbors has been 
expressed by a constantly increasing stream of donations, many of which 
consist of attractive popular works ( a welcome leaven for our professional 
erudition) ; and the presence of adults and of ladies has often had a sober- 
ing effect on some of our more heedless undergraduates. (In a later section 
of this report, note that the number of volumes received by gift far exceeds 
the number acquired by purchase). 

It was, therefore, a natural and logical step (perhaps long overdue) to 
organize our friends and neighbors into a permanent body, who would, in 
the broadest sense, give the library their support and encouragement, and 
would meet occasionally, in a spirit of fellowship, to enjoy its atmosphere 
more intimately. 

The steps by which the association has grown to a body of over two 
hundred and fifty members, with almost a thousand dollars in its treasury, 
are worth recording. 

On November fifth, 1943, fifty-seven guests of the College met at dinner 
in the Common Room to consider the proposed organization, and to listen 
to the judicious remarks of a neighbor, Catherine Drinker Bowen, who had 
collected material in the Haverford Library for a now famous book, and to 
the witty "address" of one of our most distinguished alumni, Christopher 
Morley, '10, who had come under the spell of the Haverford Library at more 
different stages of his life than any living person. 

The officers appointed for the first year were: President ("without 
portfolio"), Christopher Morley; Vice-President, W. Nelson West, 3rd; 
Secretary, Dean P. Lockwood; Treasurer, Margaret Taylor Macintosh; and 
to assist these officers as members of the Executive Committee, President 

[twenty 



Felix Morley, President emeritus William W. Comfort, Catherine Drinker 
Bowen, Thomas E. Drake, John F. Gummere, Harrison Hires, Walter C. 
Janney, and Ames Johnston. 

Three Bulletins (the official publication of the "Associates") were issued 
by the Secretary on November twentieth, December twenty-seventh, and 
March first. Inaugurating an exhibition of autograph letters in the Treasure 
Room, Professor Edward D. Snyder spoke on Letters in Literature at the 
first regular meeting on Sunday afternoon, March twelfth, 1944. The 
exhibition centered about the rich collection of literary correspondence 
presented to the Library by Christopher Morley — the greatest single dona- 
tion ever made to supplement our already famous Charles Roberts 
Autograph Collection. Fifteen other associates contributed interesting 
exhibits, the rarest being those loaned by Walter C. Janney, who subse- 
quently presented to the Library two remarkable holograph letters — that of 
the youthful Napoleon and that of Woodrow Wilson to Andrew Carnegie. 

Bulletin No. 4 was issued on June first, as an invitation to the second 
regular meeting, on Sunday afternoon, June eighteenth, at which Samuel 
Scoville, Jr. spoke on Collections and Recollections (literary and biblio- 
graphical, for the most part). At this meeting four "elder statesmen" 
whose services to the Library had been outstanding were made honorary 
life-members: William W. Comfort, Rufus M. Jones, Morris E. Leeds, and 
Walter C. Janney. 

The future of the Library Associates will depend upon the variety of 
activities initiated and the enthusiasm with which they are carried out. 
Many such organizations have followed a conventional routine to the point 
of stagnation. The disposition of the funds collected by the association for 
the benefit of the Library will be decided at the end of the current year. 

II 

An encouraging feature of the "library in action" continues to be the 
student morale. Improvement began to show itself three years ago, when 
we moved into our commodious new quarters. It would, of course, be 
unfair to ascribe the improvement wholly to physical causes, for the relief 
of overcrowding, which may have benefited student conduct, is a purely 
negative matter. The improvement, moreover, to the best of my belief, has 
gone steadily on during the three years of our occupancy of the new build- 
ing. It is evident therefore that there have been more important factors. I 
am not sure that I am cognizant of them all, but, in the first place, the 
seriousness of the war effort and of the accelerated program has surely had 
something to do with it. Credit may also be given to the presence of older 

twenty-one} 



students in the military units. Coeducation has also helped, for there is 
no doubt that young women work more steadily and conscientiously than 
young men. 

It is to be hoped that further good results will come from the extension 
of the honor system. The existing library rules have been embodied in toto 
in the official "standards of conduct". Perhaps through the honor system 
something can be done to solve one of the most difficult problems of student 
conduct in the library: the temporary, surreptitious removal or hiding of 
"reserve books" at times when the cooperative spirit should prevail. 

Ill 

During the past summer the final step was made in the arrangement of 
the books in the present library building. The old division of our collection 
into two groups of books, those frequently used and those stored away in 
the old stack, had long since become an anomaly and had broken down in 
practice. After thorough study of all possibilities, with a view to merging 
the two groups, it was decided to locate the main subjects in those parts of 
the building best suited in size and convenience for each. Very appropri' 
ately, the most venerable subjects, philosophy and religion, fitted into the 
North Wing; and the South Wing accommodated the modern languages 
and literatures. The social sciences fitted neatly into the first three floors 
of the stack. AH remaining subjects — exclusive, of course, of the natural 
sciences, whose main collections are in the laboratories — were accommodated 
in the large fourth tier of the stack. The locked fifth tier has proved to be 
extraordinarily useful for the storage of archieves and duplicates and other 
collections not in circulation. 



IV 

We wish to express our gratitude to our many friends for their donations 
of books or funds. In the report of the Curator of the Quaker Collection, 
some of the rarer items are mentioned. Among the nearly two thousand 
books (including duplicates) received from 269 donors, the following are 
especially noteworthy : 

From Clarence Tobias, 168 volumes and 16 boxes of pamphlets, 
collected by him to be the nucleus of a special collection called 
"The Writings of Rufus M. Jones" 

From Nicholas and John Reitzel, 750 books from the library of 
William A. Reitze'. 

[twenty-two 



I 

From Mrs. T. Ellis Barnes, 202 volumes from the estate of her 
husband. 

From Elizabeth Williamson, 160 volumes of general literature. 

From the estate of David Calvin Weller, 19 books selected from 
a collection of 70 to be distributed to Germanic societies. 

From the Emlen family, a large number of Quaker books and 
pamphlets, of which 78 have been accessioned to date. 

From Friends Historical Library, Swarthmore, 55 volumes. 

From Mrs. M. V. Melchior, a valuable set of the complete works 
of Voltaire 

From Christopher Morley, the third London edition (1632) of 
the "Essayes" of Montaigne, and a copy of Francis B. Gum- 
mere's novel, The House of Cards, now a rarity. 

From William S. Hall, a copy of Andre Favyn (or Fa vine), The 
Theater of Honour and Knighthood, London, W. laggard, 
1623 — "brother in ink" to Shakespeare's first folio. 

From Henry J. Cadbury, 36 volumes of antiquakeriana. 

From Edith Howland, 28 Quaker books and pamphlets. 

From Pendle Hill, 28 Quaker books. 

From Charles Henry Moon, 22 Quaker items. 

From Margaret Cope, 19 Quaker items. 

From Mrs. John Koons, 14 volumes of "Life". 

V 

The total number of volumes in the Library at the end of August, 1944, 
was 164,587. During the past year 3809 volumes were added; 1256 by 
purchase, 1509 by gift, and 1044 deposited by the United States Govern- 
ment as a part of our Depository Collection. This does not include the 
hundreds of pamphlets which are classified but not catalogued. The num- 
ber of volumes discarded, as worn out or of no further use to the Library, 
was 490. 

The total circulation of library books was 14,737. Of this number, 3335 
were loaned to professors, 8643 to students, and 2759 to borrowers not 
connected with the college. In addition to the above, the circulation of 
books through inter-library loan has increased yearly. This year we loaned 
334 books and borrowed 82, mostly from cooperating libraries in the 
vicinity. Many of our students preferred to borrow directly from nearby 
libraries. 

twenty-three] 



During the year we have sent about 2500 cards to the Philadelphia Union 
Catalog, and a copy of each author card made for our Quaker collection 
was forwarded to the Library of Congress Union Catalog. The former 
cards were loaned to the Bryn Mawr College Library first. 

We have also checked the supplement to the Union List of Serials, and 
submitted all our new serial entries to the H. W. Wilson Company, for 
insertion in the supplement. 

Mrs. Julia Hutchins was a member of the staff for part of the year, 
occupying the position of Army Reference-Librarian. 

Dean P. Lockwood, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE CURATOR OF THE 
QUAKER COLLECTION 

1943-44 

Haverford's collections of Quaker books and manuscripts and rarities of 
general interest continue to grow, as more and more friends decide that 
their choicer possessions are assured a safe home in the new Treasure Room. 
During the past year forty-seven donors contributed 1,910 manusrcipts, 
maps, and pictures to the library, of which 1,796 were particularly of 
Quaker interest. Foremost among the Quaker items was a magnificent 
manuscript volume, in a seventeenth-century hand, of epistles of George 
Fox and other leading Quaker ministers to the members of the Society of 
Friends in America. The book was given to the College by Mrs. Edward 
Wanton Smith and Anna Wharton Wood, in whose family it had re- 
mained since it was signed in 1714 by its first identifiable owner, Thomas 
Richardson, of Newport, Rhode Island. Large additions were also made 
to the Allinson Collection by Caroline Allinson, and to the Taylor Collec- 
tion by Margaret Taylor Macintosh. * 

William Penn's first map of Pennsylvania, prepared in 1681 immediately 
after King Charles's grant of the Province, and sold by John Thornton in 
London, was presented by Francis J. Stokes, '94. Haverfoid's copy, which 
formerly belonged to Colonel Henry D. Paxson, is one of the five known 
examples of this earliest Pennsylvania map in the United States. 

The Autograph Collection was enriched by letters of Woodrow Wilson 
[twenty-foi'r > 



and of Napoleon, the gift of Walter C. Janney, '98. Richard L. Barrows 
presented a large group of autographs, many of which were previously 
unrepresented in our collections. Professor Frank W. Fetter's gift of nine 
autographs of prominent American and British commanders in South' 
eastern Asia is probably the most up-to-the-minute collection that we have 
ever received. Christopher Morley added to our Joseph Conrad items a 
manuscript cablegram in Conrad's hand, as well as an autographed copy of 
Lord ]im. Mr. Morley also gave to Haverford, Conan Doyle's manuscript 
of An Iconoclast. But Mr. Morley 's chief gift — a notable supplement to 
the Charles Roberts Collection — was his file of some two-hundred letters 
from over a hundred modern authors. The part which this collection played 
in the first meeting of the "Library Associates" has been described by the 
Librarian on the second page of his Report. 

Among the forty-three pictures received was a Turner drawing of 
interest to cricketers, "Brighton Cricket Ground", presented by Mrs. C. 
Russell Hinchman. 

The back files of the T. Wistar Brown Teachers Fund, a foundation to 
assist teachers in Friends' schools to further their professional training, have 
also been transferred to the College, 

Among the Quaker books and pamphlets which were accessioned during 
the year were 398 volumes which came as gifts, and 130 purchases. Most 
of the purchases were new publications, which indicates that even in war 
time the flow of Quaker publications and works of Quaker interest has not 
diminished. The gifts helped to fill gaps in our collection of earlier Quaker 
writings. Of special interest were fifteen rare examples of the pamphlet 
publications of the so-called "Primitive" Friends of Pennsylvania, which 
William Bacon Evans contributed. 

Rufus M. Jones has continued to add new volumes to his collection of 
works on mysticism, but the most notable gift of the year in this respect 
was that of Clarence E. Tobias, Jr., M.A. 1930, who gave to the College 
his great collection of the published writings of Rufus Jones, including 169 
books, and sixteen boxes of periodicals and pamphlets. A published 
bibliography of these writings, prepared by N. Orwin Rush, Librarian of 
Colby College, has also been received, and will be added to this great 
memorial of Haverford's beloved philosopher-teacher. 

Students in the Reconstruction and Relief Unit used the Quaker CoUec 
tion to good advantage during the year. Of particular value in their study 
of relief problems abroad were the manuscript files of the American Friends 
Service Committee, which are being arranged and catalogued by a member 
of the Service Committee stafl^, Dr. Walter Fales. 

twenty-five] 



We have made a special effort to obtain files of the published newspapers 
and periodicals of the Friends Civilian Public Service Camps. Many of the 
papers come to us regularly, and fifty folders of back files were deposited 
with us from the libraries of camps which have been closed. 

Special visits to the Treasure Room were made during the course of the 
year by students from the Baldwin School, by members of the Library 
Associates, by the Haverford Township Historical Society, and by various 
other groups. Fourteen research scholars, from states as far removed as 
Maine and California, used the Quaker Collection during the year. Local 
readers and visitors are coming in increasing numbers. Members of the 
Library Associates, acting as volunteers, enabled us to open the Treasure 
Room on several Sunday afternoons during the Spring. 

Thomas E. Drake, 

Curator. 

REPORT OF THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The report of the Infirmary for the year, 1943-44 is as follows: 

The report of house patients is as follows: 

1943-1944 1942-1943 

Patients admitted 192 214 

Total time (days) 595 984 

Diseases are classified as follows: 

Grippe and respiratory 80 

Intestinal 39 

Joint conditions 8 

Miscellaneous 65 

Total number of visits of dispensary patients: 

1943-1944 1942-194S 

Medical 5,352 2,236 

Surgical 2,681 1,657 

Conditions are classified as follows: 

Upper respiratory 1,079 

Fracture '. 6 

Sutures 6 

General 1,709 

[twenty-six 



1944 ' 1945 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

Presented at the 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

of Haver ford College 

October 16,1945 



THIS report to the Corporation, to be read at the annual meeting by 
Acting President Macintosh, is written at some distance from the 
Haverford campus by one who no longer has administrative responsi- 
bility at the College. The situation presents an opportunity for completely 
detached analysis of which advantage should be taken. Consequently, this 
report will concern itself very little with detail, and largely with an attempt 
to consider problems of the post-war period in the light of recent experience. 

In a material sense, Haverford has come successfully through the war 
years. Instead of suffering deterioration, the plant has been largely 
improved and moderni2;ed. The dormitories, kitchen, classrooms and general 
equipment are ready to accommodate the enrollment of 400 which has been 
approved by the Board of Managers as the desirable post-war maximum. 

The chief deficiencies are in the power plant, and to a less extent in 
laboratory equipment. Arrangements have been made for taking advantage 
of surplus property disposition to meet some of these needs. The requests 
of the Chairmen of the Scientific Departments for modern laboratory 
apparatus should be taken very seriously, for there is no reason to believe 
that the scientific side of the College work will lessen in actual or relative 
importance during the post-war period. The war-time installation of an 
outstanding electronics laboratory should be followed by parallel advances 
in other lines. 

Even the most casual observer now realizes that the development of the 
atomic bomb marks one of the great dividing lines in history. The over- 
shadowing question is whether mastery of the dreadful secret of nuclear 
fission shall be used for destructive or for constructive purposes. Haverford 
might well consider the opportunity to assume leadership on the positive 

twenty-seven] 



side of this field of research. Professor T. O. Jones, still on leave of absence, 
has given much thought to the subject. 

The financial position of the College would permit reasonable investment 
in this and other fields of development. The Treasurer's Report gives 
figures of the satisfactory results of the last year. There is no disposition 
to suggest that this further operating surplus, and the practical eUmination 
of the debt of approximately $100,000 which hung over the College five 
years ago, is of itself a notable accomplishment. On the other hand, no 
educational institution can make headway on a basis of insolvency. Finan- 
cial stability, without any salary cuts and with payment of reasonable extra 
salaries for Summer Term teaching, has been achieved. There is a solid 
foundation for post-war operations. 

This accomplishment, for the difiicult year under review, could not have 
been made except for the success of the Alumni Fund, established in Septem- 
ber, 1944. Significant for the wide dispersion, as well as the amount, of 
contributions, this Fund has demonstrated the great loyalty to the College 
of graduates of sharply varymg age and background. The love of Haver- 
ford embedded in the hearts of a very large proportion of its Alumni is an 
asset of great value to the College. The privilege of giving, as an annual 
function, should unquestionably be maintained. The Alumni Association, 
whose officers never failed to respond helpfully to every form of coopera- 
tion which I suggested during my presidency, should be encouraged to 
decide among suggestions made to them as to uses of the Alumni Fund, after 
student enrollment recovers to the extent that a deficit is no longer 
threatened. 

Behind the successful financial showing lies a long and arduous effort to 
modernize business practices at the College, and to institute control methods 
permitting the responsible administrative officers to review all details of the 
financial position at any time. In September, 1940, such methods were 
completely lacking. How well they have been established may be judged 
from examination of the first Annual Report of the Comptroller, Dr. Aldo 
Caselli, as submitted to the Treasurer of the College on September 19, 1945. 
Haverford is not merely in a strong financial position. It has also developed 
fiscal procedures which, given a reasonably stable currency, should make it 
relatively easy to maintain this happy situation. 

To insure the favorable financial position, the investment policy of the 
College must be both flexible and well-informed — far more so than during 
the more predictable pre-war years. Investment policy is not regarded as 
a primary responsibility of the President of the College. But it is a matter 
of primary importance to an endowed institution and therefore one on which 
the responsible administrative officer should not hesitate to express a 

[twenty-eight 



matured opinion, the more so since he an ex officio member of the Finance 
Committee. 

Devoted as are the services of the active members of this Committee, it 
seems desirable that professional investment counsel should be employed by 
them, developing a start made in this direction during the past two years. 
I am further of the opinion that sales and purchases of securities should be 
dispersed among various investment houses where we have strong Alumni 
representation. This would increase good-will, bring useful advice and 
develop interest in our investment problems. It would be beneficial if 
qualified faculty representatives were more informed on the operations from 
which they derive the larger part of their salaries. The current portfolio 
of the College might well be published annually as a supplement to the 
Treasurer's Report. 

It is easier to say that the College has prospered in the material sense 
than to be certain that it has not suffered spiritually during the war-time 
period. The position here cannot be analyzed in a balance sheet comparison. 
On the whole, however, the spiritual values — which are the basic values — of 
Haverford have probably been more critically re-examined and are now 
perhaps more positively supported on the campus than has been the case for 
many years. It is my belief that Haverford should always emphasize 
spontaneous rather than disciplinary spiritual activity. For that reason I 
regard it as unfortunate that the Board of Managers did not more actively 
interest itself in the underlying psychology of the war-time undergraduate 
effort to extend student self-government to all phases of campus life. The 
endowment of special pre-theology scholarships, in memory of Elihu Grant, 
was a step of significance to the spiritual life of the College taken during 
the past year. 

The College was severely hampered during the war-time period by the 
absence of a strong, well-rounded and dynamic leadership in the Dean's 
Office, a lack exceedingly difficult to meet satisfactorily during the man- 
power shortage. In securing the services of Gilbert Hoag as Dean, I beUeve 
this deficiency has been met. It is a key position, calling for an intimate 
understanding of the psychology of youth in a period of profound change, 
as well as a deep appreciation of the value of the Haverford tradition. The 
position demands as much resiliency, poise and eiquanimity of temper as 
does the presidency itself. A brief annual report on student morale from 
the Office of the Dean might usefully be appended to the President's Report, 
ia the same way that reports from the Librarian and the Medical Director 
are now attached. 

Haverford derives a great advantage from its affiliation with the Society 
of Friends. On the material side, the connection assures a nucleus of 

twenty-nine] 



students from Quaker families of a type which any educational institution 
would be happy to include. It is also a factor of importance in the relative 
prosperity of the College, since Philadelphia Quakerism is well-fortified 
financially. Limitation of other types of students, in favor of desirable 
Quaker appHcants, is always justifiable at Haverford. 

The Quaker connection, not linked to a single Meeting but embracing 
the whole Orthodox stem of the Society, has given the College much of its 
educational distinction. This is in part due to the peculiar talent achieved 
by Friends in the field of education — exhibiting a happy combination of 
liberalism in outlook and conservatism in action — and in part to the extent 
to which spiritual considerations permeate the life of the convinced Quaker. 
It is essential that this appreciation of spiritual values should be implicit in 
all aspects of undergraduate training. 

Arnold Toynbee points out that during the chaos of the Eleventh to 
Fourteenth Centuries the Papacy was able to carry civilization forward 
because of "its enlistment of the purest souls and ablest wits and strongest 
characters of Western Christendom in the service of the Holy See ... it 
offered them scope for living lives and doing deeds for which there was no 
opportunity in the secular world." 

If, as seems all too apparent, we are now experiencing a modern parallel 
of the Dark Ages, it is of fundamental importance for Haverford to lay 
even greater emphasis on the quality of its faculty than has been the case 
in the past. One may reflect on the trinity of virtues possessed by Medieval 
Catholic leaders as described by Toynbee. Haverford has had more than 
its share of ''the purest souls'' and a fair average of "the strongest char- 
acters'' among its teachers. But the "ablest wits" are sometimes discouraged. 
A part of the Quaker tradition which Francis B. Gummere and Rufus Jones 
proved to be superfluous at Haverford was the belief that godliness and 
sprightliness are incompatible. 

The most important single factor, for Haverford's post-war success, is a 
faculty of pronounced distinction. While the College has always been 
fortunate in possessing at least a sizable minority of outstanding teachers- — 
artists in their profession— Haverford has also been held back by the 
appointment of mediocre men whose services have been retained long after 
their mediocrity was all too clearly demonstrated. Because of the baneful 
effects of the system of tenure, faculty appointments are unquestionably 
the heaviest single responsibility of the President. A mistake in this func- 
tion may impede the progress of the institution over a period of decades. 
Since the faculty must be a fraternity the opinion of its best qualified mem- 
bers should be consulted in making new appointments, in addition to the 

[thirty 



approval of the Board of Managers. This pohcy is now in effect and should 
be continued. 

The result of the various Haverford assets has been to produce under- 
graduates who are, as a generality, urbane without being shallow; tolerant 
without being indifferent; thoughtful without being superficial. The pro- 
duct tends distinctly towards idealism as opposed to materialism. In all the 
professions, especially in medicine and teaching, in the arts, in science, in 
religious leadership, in enlightened business direction, the College has made 
notable contributions to society. It has been most deficient in encouraging 
public service as a career. Haverfordians have not been notable either as 
crusaders or as politicians, using the word in the correct and not the 
invidious sense. 

Here may be traced certain negative aspects of the Quaker influence, for 
this has repressive and separatist as well as ideali2;ing effects. The most 
serious weakness in Haverford training, however, is a certain smugness for 
which satisfactory justification is often lacking. The College lacks crusad- 
ing zeal; is unduly satisfied with its methods; is distinctly critical of innova- 
tion and tends to shield rather than to expose its priests and acolytes, when 
human anguish is at issue. Both faculty and students tend to emphasize 
rights and privileges rather than responsibilities. There is a debilitating 
conviction that somebody else will in any crisis solve all the problems. 

This criticism must be viewed against the background of very great 
accomplishment. But it nonetheless helps to explain why Haverford men, 
though they go far, do not more frequently go further. Haverford has too 
much of that complacency which is fatal to outstanding achievement. If 
we wish the College to become great, rather than merely to remain good, 
this issue of complacency must be squarely faced by all elements of the 
organization, most notably by the faculty. 

At least some of this deficiency can be traced to the over-centralization 
and paternalism which characterized the College organization until the 
upheavel of the recent war. War-time experience, especially the wholly 
novel problems brought by the training of military units, forced a diffusion 
of responsibility and a decentralization of administration which should 
make the College permanently more democratic and more vigorous without 
impeding its teaching efficiency. The further development of student self- 
government was favored by me as a part of this invigorating process. 

During the past year much time and energy and serious thought were 
expended by an able faculty committee, under the very competent chair- 
manship of Dr. Ralph Sargent, on the general subject of post-war planning. 
The report of this Committee, and those of- its subcommittees, are available 

THIRTY-ONEj 



and contain a great deal of extremely valuable material. Certain of its 
suggestions are already in effect. Sharp disagreement over other issues 
among members of the faculty led, however, to the Committee's resignation, 
as of June 2, 1945, with a number of recommendations not adopted. As 
the presiding officer at a series of meetings at which the faculty examined 
the Committee's report, I was in a good position to note the particularism, 
the indifference to the general welfare and the occasional pettiness of 
outlook which characterized some members of the faculty in attempting to 
solve a major problem affecting the interests of the institution as a whole. 
Paternalism and a parochial attitude have produced a situation in which the 
faculty finds it difficult to work together as a body. It is no great consolation 
to realize that this same situation exists at most educational institutions, and 
is perhaps an inevitable result of the unnaturally sheltered conditions of 
academic life. 

The inability of the faculty to agree on a post-war program was not, 
however, an unmixed evil. In the first place, Haverford instruction has 
always tended to concentrate on fundamentals, and the value of adhering 
to fundamentals is emphasized, not minimized, by the chaos of a period of 
pronounced social change. The effort to elaborate reforms to fit an antici- 
pated social framework is often more than wasted because of human inability 
to anticipate the shape the framework will take. In the words of T. S. Eliot, 
much educational reform is an attempt to give our fathers and our grand- 
fathers a better education. 

In the second place, the real issue in post-war planning is not the blueprint 
but the teacher. If the teacher is good, he will meet the problems of a 
changing age effectively as they arise. If he is not good, no blueprint of 
new methods and new courses will of itself improve his shortcomings. 

In the third place, the demonstrated inability of the Haverford faculty to 
agree on the character of desirable educational improvements at the College 
is an object lesson which should be extremely beneficial to the group. In the 
words of a memorandum which the Faculty Post-War Planning Committee 
sent me on May 23, 1945: 

"One of the chief aims of the Committee has been to lift the faculty 
from its individually separate interests to a level where it will see the 
college as a whole, to see it in relation to society of which it is a part, 
to see the whole college in relation to the pressures of the future, to 
give a vision of the possibilities for Haverford College in the days to 
come. It now appears that that aim has, at best, been only partially 
achieved." 

The efforts of the faculty to plan for the post-war College having ended 
in relative futility, it becomes the duty of the College administration to 

[thirty-two 



take such action as may be deemed desirable. The ideas on which such 
action should be based obviously have a much better chance of acceptance 
because of the demonstrated inability of some faculty members to construct 
as effectively as they can obstruct. The recommendations of the adminis- 
tration, however, should be confined to principles. If these principles are 
accepted by the Board as a matter of policy, the teachers can be counted 
upon to work out the details cooperatively. In my opinion, the principles 
which should be adopted, and which can be adopted with a minimum of 
upheaval, are as follows : 

(1) Departmental Integration. Especially in a small college there should 
be the closest possible interdepartmental cooperation, particularly in fields 
where a rigid demarcation of instruction is impossible. A good deal in this 
direction has been achieved during the war-time period. But it still remains 
true that there is inadequate consultation between the History and 
Economics Departments, or between the Government and Philosophy 
Departments, to cite only two illustrations. Naturally, this introversion 
is most pronounced in the field of the Social Sciences, least notable in the 
Physical Sciences, although even among the latter there has been inadequate 
coordination of Biology and Chemistry instruction for so fundamental a 
purpose as a well-rounded pre-medical curriculum. 

(2) Seminar Instruction. The lecture system at Haverford, requiring 
inadequate intellectual effort from either professor or student, should be 
supplemented in Languages and the Social Sciences by a greater development 
of the conversational seminar technique. The value of the latter in per- 
mitting the student to meet his teacher on an equal footing, and in 
permitting the teacher to probe the thinking processes (as distinct from 
memory) of the individual undergraduate, can scarcely be exaggerated. 
The institution of the interdepartmental seminar would further assist the 
necessary interdepartmental cooperation referred to above. 

(3) Student Initiative. The initiative and intellectual enterprise of the 
individual student should be encouraged by more special project work, 
regardless of the subject of major concentration. I wholly underwrite the 
recommendations of the Faculty Post-War Planning Committee in this 
field. There is far too much tendency to hold the Haverford undergraduate 
back rather than to push him forward. During his last two years, at least, 
the undergraduate should be encouraged to do more research on his own, 
with less class instruction and more tutorial guidance. The relative lack of 
initiative among Haverford Alumni is probably at least in part attributable 
to the tendency of the curriculum to enforce a stately, measured, perhaps 
difficult yet essentially unambitious intellectual progress. The war-time 
experience with acceleration indicates how much undergraduate time the 

thirty-three] 



College has wasted in the past. I realized this for myself when I had the 
opportunity to contrast the stimulating methods of Oxford University with 
those of Haverford instruction immediately after the last war. 

(4) Collateral Reading. Some Haverford professors, following the 
methods of secondary school teaching, rely to a pronounced degree on text- 
book instruction. Of course that is easier for the teacher, but it impresses 
the undergraduate with the pernicious idea that he can and should rely 
on a single source for his information. In spite of the excellence of our 
Library facilities, wide collateral reading is not yet adequately encouraged 
at Haverford, though more so than in the days when I was an under- 
graduate. It is pitiably true that many Haverford graduates have never 
really learned how to read, in the deeper sense of the verb. A large measure 
of elimination of textbook teaching should go hand in hand with the develop- 
ment of individual research projects. 

(5) Development of Self -Discipline. Haverford still places far too much 
reliance on arbitrary rules and regulations which tend to discourage student 
initiative and responsibility. Among the practices having this effect the 
"cut'" system ranks high. After Freshman year no student should be com- 
pelled to attend any class for which he has registered. It should be assumed 
that the class will be so interesting and worthwhile that he will attend it 
voluntarily. The student is very often a better judge than the teacher of 
whether or not his time is being fruitfully spent, especially in a college which 
is in a position to be as selective in admissions as is the case at Haverford. 
If the occasional lazy or unambitious student suffers from over-cutting, his 
defects will thus become more quickly apparent and, if necessary, his 
enforced withdrawal from the College will be expedited. The stimulus to 
the teacher of having a voluntary rather than an enforced classroom attend- 
a.re is obvious. 

(6) Examinations. The examination system is overdone at Haverford. 
Many of the tests seem to me mere memory exercises, with little more than 
a shallow disciplinary purpose behind them. A further shortcoming here 
is that meticulous grades, sometimes carried to a decimal point of a per- 
centage, are awarded for tests which actually have little educational 
significance. Here again the tendency is to emphasize arbitrary forms at 
the expense of vital education. 

(7) Required Courses. For reasons implicit in the preceding points I am 
skeptical of the desirability of any required courses other than Freshman 
English and Physical Education. In a small college, where every student is 
personally known to the Director of Admissions and the Dean, skillful 
administrative guidance can do much to direct the student voluntarily to 
those courses which should be included in his individual program. On the 

[thirty FOUR 



other hand, the American college graduate should certainly have at least 
some famiharity with the tenets of the Christian faith, with the outstanding 
spiritual achievements of Western Civilization and with the principles of 
his own form of government. In my opinion the comprehensive final 
examination of every Senior should include searching questions, both 
written and oral, in these three fields. No courses should be compulsory; 
but the demonstrated familiarity of an educated man with the cultural, 
ethical and political motivation of his civilization should be a prerequisite 
for the Haverford degree. The preparation of a reading list, to be covered 
in leisurely fashion by every student during the college course and including 
the New Testament, could properly be made a cooperative faculty under- 
taking. 

As I have often said at the College, the purpose of higher education seems 
to me reducible to three simple principles, too often obscured by a ritualistic 
mumbo'jumbo which serves only to confuse and obfuscate the issue. A 
college education, and particularly a Haverford education, should: 

(A) Stimulate the intellectual curiosity of the student, wholly regardless 
of the subject he is studying, on the reasonable assumption that since real 
education must come spontaneously from within, and can never be success- 
fully imposed from without, an aroused interest is the essential spark which 
makes the motor operate. 

(B) Development of the critical and analytical faculty, without which 
progress in any line of human endeavor is impossible. The tendency at 
many educational institutions, Haverford not excluded, is to repress rather 
than to develop this critical faculty. A volume could be written on the 
disastrous effects of such repression on every aspect of civilized life except 
the scientific, now out of balance largely because it has encouraged critical 
techniques which other so-called "discipHnes" have repressed. 

(C) As a balance wheel for the individual who has intellectual curiosity, 
and has developed a critical faculty, there must be emphasis on those 
intangibles which are summed up in the word "character". In this field, 
Haverford has been notably successful. It is important that in emphasizing 
the first two points, in which Haverford instruction is deficient, the necessity 
of maintaining and developing the third should constantly be kept in mind. 

In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to express to the 
Corporation my great appreciation for the opportunity of serving five years 
as President of Haverford. They were extremely interesting years and I 
shall always treasure the privilege which I have had. As is, I think, fully 
understood, my resignation from the position was due solely to a conviction 
that my contribution was essentially to direct the College during the difficult 
war-time period. My efi^ort during this era of transition — as it will prove 

thirty-five] 



to be — was to build a satisfactory bridge between the work of the Haverford 
that was and the work of the Haverford that will be. The institution, I 
believe, has every opportunity for even greater achievement in the future 
than it has accomplished in the past. 

Felix Morley. 

MINUTE ADOPTED BY THE CORPORATION 

AND BY THE BOARD OF MANAGERS UPON 

THE RETIREMENT OF MORRIS E. LEEDS 

FROM THE PRESIDENCY OF THE 

CORPORATION 

Morris E. Leeds 

President of the Corporation of 

Haverford College and Chairman of the Board 

of Managers 

1928 - 1945 

Morris E. Leeds has advised us that he feels he must retire as President 
of the Corporation and Chairman of the Board of Managers. He has asked 
us not to make it difficult for him to carry out this decision which he feels 
clearly is a right one. We cannot do otherwise than respect his wishes but, 
on our part, we find it difficult to look forward to his withdrawal from the 
post in which for so many years he has guided the management of the 
College. 

After graduating from Haverford in the Class of 1888, and taking up 
teaching for a year or two, he started a business career in which his unusual 
capacities and energy have won for him exceptional success. At its meeting 
in January, 1909, our Board elected him a Manager. What he has given 
to the College during the ensuing thirty'six years in loyalty, service, 
donations and leadership cannot be adequately told in words. We, who 
have been his associates, are conscious of his contribution in a deeper sense 
than we can express verbally to him or enter upon our records. 

His first committee appointment was on the Library Committee. Perhaps 
this cannot be regarded as foreshadowing his later interest in the Library 
and his munificent gifts to it, but in the light of these it may be mentioned, 
at least, as a noteworthy coincidence. In 1912 he became a member of the 
Executive Committee and served continuously on it for sixteen years until 

[thirty-six 



his election in 1928 to the presidency of the Corporation. In 1916 the 
death of T. Wistar Brown, then President, occasioned a new distribution 
of offices. Asa S. Wing became President, J. Henry Scattergood, 
Treasurer, and Morris Leeds succeeded Henry Scattergood as Secretary of 
the Board of Managers. This position he also held continuously until 
1928. The minuted during this period bear witness to the accuracy of his 
recording. In those days the minutes were read at each meeting and one 
notes the care with which he tried to achieve adequacy of the record without 
burdening the Board with lengthy readings. Though the secretaryship often 
entailed considerable labor he was frequently called upon to serve on 
important committees. For four years, 1923 to 1927, he carried not only 
the secretaryship but membership on the Executive Committee, the Com- 
mittee on Honorary Degrees and the Committee on the T. Wistar Brown 
Graduate School. There were also other assignments. His judment has 
been greatly valued with reference to faculty appointments and salaries. 
He has been a member of the standing committee to assist the president on 
these matters ever since its establishment in 1929. He served on the Pension 
Fund Committee in 1931, and when in 1934 the College was forced to 
consider the question of reduction in professors' salaries he was one of the 
committee appointed to deal with this delicate subject. He took an active 
part in matters associated with Haverford's centenary, serving on the 
Centenary Building and Endowment Fund Committee set up in 1924 and 
the later Centenary Fund Committee. 

When the retirement of Asa S. Wing in 1928 caused a vacancy in the 
presidency of the Corporation, Morris Leeds was elected to that office which 
carries with it service as chairman of the Board of Managers. Thereafter 
special responsibility rested upon him in all cases of important management 
issues. He has always responded willingly to the many demands made upon 
him and has guided the course of affairs in such a way as to evoke admira 
tion and confidence. 

Morris Leeds's gifts to the College make him one of its chief financial 
benefactors. Many different aspects of Haverford's life — buildings, 
grounds, equipment, faculty requirements and funds — bear quiet witness to 
his extraordinarily generous bounty. Some of his many donations may be 
referred to particularly. He gave liberally for Lloyd Hall and to the 
William Penn Fund. In addition to being a leading contributor to the 
Centenary Fund he has donated a large fund established by the Board in his 
name as part of the General Endowment Fund. Above all is the present 
Library. While many Haverfordians have given liberally for this, the 
extent of Morris Leeds's donations makes this building, with its special room 

thirty-seven} 



for Quaker collections (given by him exclusively), stand largely as a 
memorial to his unstinted generosity. 

The span of years of his service on the Board included the periods of both 
the first and the second World War. It was inevitable that for a Quaker 
college these should be periods of particular difficulties and serious choices 
of policy. They were complicated still further by the fact that in each case 
a new president of the College assumed office shortly before our country 
entered the war as a belligerent. In both periods Morris Leeds took a lead' 
ing part in the selection of a president and in shaping Haverford's course. 
In 1916 he was an influential member of the committee appointed to 
nominate a successor to President Sharpless, served on the committee :n 
charge of President Comfort's inauguration and was one of those appointed 
to advise the president on the possible use of Sharpless Hall as a hospital 
during the war. In the fall of 1918 he was selected to serve with Isaac 
Sharpless to assist the president in the rearrangement of faculty remunera- 
tion. 

When President Comfort was about to retire from office and the second 
world war was shortly to begin a period of much strain opened before the 
College. Morris Leeds, as President of the Corporation and Chairman of 
the Board, bore a great part of the burden. He was a member of the com- 
mittee appointed in the fall of 1938 to choose a new president. And when 
President Morley took office in all the stresses of war time it was natural 
that he should lean heavily upon the Chairman of the Board for advice and 
support. We gratefully acknowledge the great debt which the College 
owes him for all his burdensome labor, his wise counsel, and his guidance 
of its affairs during the whole period of the war. 

The leadership which he has given ever since he became President of the 
Corporation has been characterized by those qualities of mind and spirit 
which we have come to associate unforgettably with him — freedom from 
narrow or petty prejudices, the wish to see both men and issues whole and 
appraise them with the utmost fairness, a seasoned liberalism, openness of 
mind, a progressive spirit and exceptionally sound judgment. These 
qualities, combined with his unusual capacity for successful management 
and his ripe business experience, he placed at Haverford's service with an 
unfailing devotion to the best interests of the College. If we rightly sense 
his attitude, his interest lies in maintaining Haverford as a college of high 
scholarly standards and with a moral and spiritual atmosphere that reflects 
the principles and philosophy of the Society of Friends at their best. 

We cannot but have the deepest feelings of regret that we are no longer 
to have his valued and trusted leadership as President of the Corporation 
and Board Chairman. We welcome, however, this opportunity to pay him 

[thirty-eicht 



our tribute of honor, gratitude and affection and we are happy that we can 
do this with the hope that we shall continue to have him as an associate and 
friend in the Board for many years to come. 

REPORT OF THE ACTING PRESIDENT 
October 16, 1945 

Since President Morley's report was written at a distance from the campus 
and with the object of discussing policies, rather than giving details, I have 
prepared a supplement with special reference to the period from June 3, 
1945, to the present, and I have incorporated in it some of the factual 
material which, for historical purposes, is usually included in the report of 
the President. 

The President's Report to the Corporation in October 1944, together 
with the Librarian's Report, and that of the Curator of the Quakeriana 
Collection, and the list of Faculty Publications, was issued in mimeographed 
form but never published. Unless there is good reason for not doing so, 
that report, together with the combined report for this year, will be pub' 
lished together. 

ACCELERATION 

During the last year and a half, and particularly since V'J Day, the 
issue of acceleration has been discussed. There has been a growing feeling 
on the part of the faculty, and a majority of the students, that the time 
has come for us to give up year'round instruction as normal procedure. The 
Summer Term of 1945 was our fourth consecutive Summer Term and 
showed increasing evidence of the excessive strain which had been apparent 
the preceding year. 

In August, the faculty in residence went on record as opposed to a 
Summer Term in 1946, if it could possibly be avoided. For those men who 
felt they must continue, it was suggested that we list a number of uni- 
versities holding Summer Sessions, credit from which would be acceptable 
to Haverford. The majority of the students have indicated that they do not 
wish to accelerate further. Those who do, have expressed approval of the 
plan suggested above. 

There are a number of veterans who feel the necessity for pushing on as 
rapidly as possible, but in the main, these men feel that they have been 
pushed long enough, and since they are under no obligation to hurry as far 
as their government benefits are concerned, they express themselves as 
anxious to get their education at a pace which allows for assimilation. The 

THIRTY'NINE] 



professional schools, 'also, have expressed themselves as less than pleased 
with the results of acceleration. 

At present, the general feeling about acceleration seems reasonably clear. 
But, as President Morley indicated in his 1944 report, there still remain 
factors, such as the institution of a plan of universal military training, to 
mention the chief one, which might upset the present trend, and call for a 
different solution. 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

Beginning in June, applications for admission mounted rapidly, with a 
further rise after V'J Day in September as the rate of discharge from the 
services increased. This semester started with a total of 172 under 
graduates, as compared with 125 at this time last year. In addition, there 
are fourteen in the Reconstruction and Relief Unit, and one graduate 
student. 

The activity in the Admissions Office continues, with many inquiries and 
applications. It is already clear that we shall further enlarge the size of the 
student body in January. Insofar as possible we have held to our usual 
admission standards, at the same time using all justifiable latitude in regard 
to the veterans. Had we been willing to go a few steps farther, the College 
would now be close to full. I think we are well-advised in exercising our 
customary care in selection. 

Classification of the student body by terms shows the following com' 
parison with last year: 

Term Fall Semester, 194S Fall Semester, 1944 

3 
13* 
4 
12 
10 
9 
38 
36 



VIII 


5 


VII 


10 


VI 


10 


V 


13 


IV 


13 


III 


19 


II 


34 


I 


48 


Unclassified and special 


20 



172 125 



The above table does not include the Reconstruction and Relief Unit, and 
the graduate student. 

[forty 



The student body this year represents 21 states, as compared with 23 a 
year ago. In addition, the following are represented: Hawaii, Singapore, 
Cuba, Argentina, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Canada, and 
Morocco. There is the possibility that we may have one student from China 
in the middle of the year, and two from Norway. 

Undergraduates who are members of the Society of Friends number 19, 
or 11.1 per cent of the total. 

There follows a comparative table of registrations by departments, the 
sharp increase in Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Philosophy, and 
Sociology, being worthy of note : 

Departments Registrations 

1945 1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 

Art 1 3 14 19 

Astronomy 1 1 15 22 43 

Biblical Literature 1 12 3 12 18 27 

Biology 61 32 46 66 81 92 

Chemistry 79 54 78 228 224 180 

Economics 30 22 27 124 147 155 

Engineering 17 15 25 95 74 62 

English 151 101 77 195 224 187 

French 43 26 25 36 64 93 

German 56 59 52 117 100 111 

Government 31 36 34 94 100 121 

Greek 2 7 6 24 18 12 

History 94 60 45 98 143 156 

Italian 4 1 8 

Latin 8 4 5 30 24 29 

Mathematics 68 50 59 162 158 121 

Music 7 14 5 31 18 23 

Philosophy 56 ( 

^ , < 37 35 86 99 95 

Psychology 27 (. 

Physics 34 35 58 120 77 83 

Sociology 42 14 28 43 72 82 

Spanish 22 20 21 65 48 12 

Humanistics 6 

forty-one} 



Haverford Students at Bryn Mawr 

Art 1 

English 1 

Physics 1 

Psychology 4 

Russian 1 

History 1 

Degrees, 1944'4S 
Awarded B.A. B.S. M.A. M.S. Hon. Degree 

January 27, 1945 10 2 

June 2, 1945 14 10 1 

August 24, 1945 6 2 4 1 



30 4 14 1 1 

RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF UNIT 

Our second Reconstruction and Relief Unit, now reduced to 14 (12 
women and 2 men), from its original number of 25, is now back to complete 
its final quarter which will end in December. This Unit is again housed in 
Government House, with Dr. and Mrs. Wylie as House Directors. 

Dr. Pfund has been serving as Director of the Unit in Dr. Steere's 
absence. A report on the activities of the first Unit, many of whom are 
now abroad, and on the activities of the present Unit during the summer, is 
too long to include here. 

FINANCIAL OUTLOOK 

The Treasurer's Report for the year just closed shows a much more 
favorable picture than we had dared hope. As President Morley has indi- 
cated, this i? due in no small part to the generous support of the Alumni, 
through the Alumni Fund. 

The outlook for the coming year is much brighter now than it was in 
June, at which time a deficit of $104,000 was forecast. The increased 
enrollment, and a further study of the budget, reduces this to $74,819.80. 
Although additions to the student body in the middle of the year will be of 
further help, we cannot escape a deficit this year. Again the Alumni Fund 
will be of paramount importance, and I hope that our Alumni will make the 
second year of the Fund play as vital a part in the operation of the College 
as was the case in the year just closed. 

[forty TWO 



I should like to add my word of acknowledgment to those of President 
Morley's, in regard to the splendid job that Dr. Caselli has done in his 
capacity as Comptroller. 

THE FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 

In June, Bennett S. Cooper began his work as Alumni Secretary, Direc- 
tor of Placement, and Assistant to the President. We are fortunate in 
having an interested alumnus whose experience since his graduation has 
been of particular value in fitting him for this important position. 

President Morley has spoken of our good fortune in having Gilbert Hoag 
as Dean. Mr. Morley 's suggestion that a report from the Office of the 
Dean be appended to the President's Report is one in which I heartily 
concur. 

Dr. Carl AUendoerfer has returned from his leave of absence in Washing- 
ton at a very opportune time for the Mathematics Department. 

William Docherty has been discharged from the Navy, and 'returns as 
Instructor in Physical Education, and coach of football, at a time when, with 
our growing numbers, his presence was sadly needed. 

We are most fortunate in our two visiting professors. Howard Brinton 
is with us from Pendle Hill, giving a course in "The History and Philosophy 
of Quakerism", and J. Duncan Spaeth, "American Literature to the Civil 
War". 

POST-WAR PLANNING 

On the matter of post-war planning I find myself in a most curious posi- 
tion. The limitation of time in this report prevents my discussing it here in 
the detail which I should like. 

Having sat with Dr. Sargent's committee in all its deliberations, I have 
had the opportunity to see the thoughtful consideration given to all aspects 
of the College's program, and in the main I am in agreement with the com- 
mittee recommendations. I have been struck with the degree to which the 
plans published by such institutions as Amherst, Yale, Harvard and Swarth- 
more, parallel the conclusions of the Haverford committee in their essential 
patterns. 

In his comments Mr. Morley put his finger on what I consider to be the 
basic consideration when he said that the real issue was not the blueprint, 
but the teacher. In reading the plans which I have mentioned above, I have 
been struck, not so much by tKe stupendous task involved in writing a post- 

forty-three} 



war plan, but rather by the expensive, deHcate and arduous business of 
putting it into practice. 

In my opinion there has been more agreement among the Haverford 
faculty on the proposed plan than the President's Report would seem to 
indicate. It is possible that no small part of the disagreements which arose 
may, to a degree at any rate, be attributed to the manner in which the plan 
was presented to the faculty. 

Already some of the recommendations have been put into effect. As the 
veterans began to return we were faced with the necessity of assimilating 
them as rapidly and as smoothly as possible, and the procedure for doing 
this, as suggested by the committee, has had the approval of both the faculty 
and the Board. The committee suggestions in regard to the maintenance 
and operation of the plant have already proved helpful. Certain aspects of 
interdepartmental cooperation and of individual projects recommended by 
the committee were already in effect. The requirements in regard to our 
language requirements, and our language teaching, have been scrutinized 
and changes have been made. 

When Dr. Sargent's committee resigned, the problem arose as to what 
the next step should be. It did not seem to me wise to appoint a new 
committee which would repeat the work already done by Dr. Sargent's 
committee. Obviously, it would be pointless to reappoint a committee 
which had already fulfilled its function. In order to consider the matter 
further, to smooth out the points of difference, and to refine the plan, I have 
asked the Dean and three members of the faculty to sit with me, not as a 
formal committee, but in an advisory capacity. Some intensive work by this 
group will, I believe, produce marked results. The Post-War Planning 
Committee of the Board is at work, and the Board itself has already given 
some sections of the plan its approval. 

In general, I feel that we have made somewhat more progress than these 
reports would seem to indicate. While it would be pleasant to have a com- 
plete report ready for publication, I am not at all sure that this would be 
an unmixed blessing. It seems to me imperative that we preserve a degree 
of flexibihty to meet conditions which are changing rapidly. 

The program of the College should be subject to constant review and 
constant modification. The College benefited greatly by the Centenary 
Plan, despite the fact that certain aspects of it were never put into effect. 
The College has already benefited by the work done by the Post-War 
Planning Committee. 

I conclude this section with a report of progress, and my assurance that 
we shall continue to give this important matter the attention it deserves. 

[forty-four 



IN CONCLUSION 

As the College begins its II 3th year, I am impressed by the fashion in 
which it weathered the storm of the last four years, and by the vitality with 
which it begins the difficult period ahead. This testing period showed our 
strengths, and what is more important, our weaknesses. The hurly-burly 
of the war years was an excellent preparation for a time which, though 
different in character, will be no less exacting in its demands for foresight, 
persistence, and courage. 

The period of transition will bring about many changes, but there remains 
that essential core which has made Haverford what it is; the thought, the 
energy, the hopes, that many men over the years have poured into it. 

Archibald Macintosh, 

Acting President. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN FOR 1944-45 

To the President: 

I submit herewith the Report on the Library for the academic year 
1944-45. 

GENERAL 

There is little to record in the way of new or unusual activities in the 
Library during the past year. Rigid economy of administration — both 
enforced and voluntary — and the small student enrollment combined to 
produce an uneventful year. The reduced Staff had to confine itself 
strictly to routine duties. Several pressing agenda, such as the labelling of 
the shelves to correspond with the new locations of subjects, had to be 
postponed. Cooperation with the Philadelphia Bibliographical Center was 
extended to include contributions to the master file of periodicals. Mem- 
bership in the Library Associates, as was almost inevitable in the second 
year, fell off 24 percent, but contributions declined 54 percent — an indica- 
tion, no doubt, of the current financial trend. 

We can be thankful that the endowed book-funds of the Library have 
carried us over the difficult war years without curtailment in the steady 
growth of our scholarly collections. We have not fallen behind in our 

forty-five] 



acquisitions. Reserve funds have even been built up for acquiring foreign 
books, particularly from European countries, after war time restrictions shall 
have been removed. Gifts have been notable both in quaHty and in quantity. 
The steady increase in inter-library loans is a significant development. 
It is usually misinterpreted as a financial saving. Cooperation with other 
institutions is a convenience and a valuable aid to scholarship, but it can 
never be other than an additional expense. To locate and borrow books 
which are not in our library is a great service to our readers, but we have 
to pay for it both directly and indirectly. Constant exchange and borrow- 
ing may some day reach the point where its administrative cost will be 
greater than the purchase of a reasonable annual quota of books for our own 
possession. One thing is sure at Haverford: the income of our endowed 
book-funds will continue to be used to the maximum for the purchase of 
books, and all use of the property of other institutions — whether near or far 
— will be an additional expense to the College. Any really extensive 
cooperation along these lines may well be prohibitive. 

GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS 

The total number of volumes in the library at the end of August, 1945, 
was 166,504. During the past year 2973 volumes were added, 1509 by 
purchase, 1286 by gift, and 178 sent by the United States Government for 
our Government Depository Collection. In addition to the latter item from 
the U. S. Government, there were a great many other books and pamphlets, 
which are filed uncataloged, but are readily available to the public. Fifty- 
six books were discarded. 

GIFTS 

Among the many gifts which were received the following should be 
especially noted : 

From Eli2;abeth Williamson, 131 books of general literature. 

From Mrs. Gordon Hartshorn, 56 books, mostly English literature. 

From John L. Scull, a set of the Harvard classics in 5 1 volumes, and 
140 books, mostly English literature. 

From Aldo Caselli, 4 1 books on Italian literature and art. 

From Thomas E. Drake, 33 books. 

From L. H. Rittenhouse, 30 books on engineering. 

From Rufus M. Jones, 23 books on religion and mysticism. 

From W. B. Evans, 2 1 Quaker books. 

[forty-six 



From Mrs. E. W. Smith, 18 Quaker books. 

From J. M. Walsh, 17 books. 

From Walter S. Hinchman, 1 5 books. 

From Margaret R. Ladd, 14 Quaker books. 

From W. W. Comfort, 12 books, and a large number of pamph- 
lets, as yet uncataloged. 

From Felix Morley, 8 volumes. 

From Christopher Morley, 7 volumes. 

From C. O. Oakley, 7 books on mathematics. 

From Wm. E. Sherpick, 5 books on sailing, for the Haverford 
Nautical Club. 

CIRCULATION 

The total circulation of library books vyas 13,099. Of this number, 2767 
were loaned to the faculty, 7438 to students, and 2894 to borrowers not 
connected with the college. Our largest monthly circulation was in Febru- 
ary, and the smallest in September. Twenty-five per cent of books borrowed 
by students were reserved books. 

INTER LIBRARY LOANS 

This branch of library work has grown exceedingly in the past two or 
three years, since the great usefulness of the Philadelphia Union Catalog 
has been discovered and tested. In spite of the fact that many of our 
students and professors go to cooperating libraries in this vicinity and borrow 
books for themselves, the number of books sent out by us to other libraries 
for their readers has steadily increased. We, too, have borrowed more than 
ever before and are grateful for all the volumes we have been permitted to 
use. Last year, 380 volumes were sent to other libraries and 156 were 
borrowed by us. 

Dean P. Lockwood, 
Amy L. Post. 



forty-seven] 



REPORT OF THE CURATOR OF THE 
QUAKER COLLECTION 

1944-45 

In spite of the restrictions and shortages of wartime life, the year 1944-45 
was the most active since the Library's Quaker Collection (rare books and 
manuscripts) was brought together in the Treasure Room three years ago. 
Sixtyfive friends of the College presented manuscripts, maps, pictures, and 
microfilms to the Library, to the number of 2,220, an increase both in the 
number of donors and the volume of donations over the totals for 1943-44. 
Of these, 1,891 items were of distinctly Quaker interest. Our accessions in 
books were also larger than last year, 162 being added to the Quaker Col- 
lection by purchase, and 3 1 5 by gift, a total of 477. 

Among the Quaker papers was a copy of the rare 1719 edition of the 
manuscript Discipline of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, one item in a gift 
of unusual interest by J. Morris Wistar. Mrs. Edward Wanton Smith 
added a large number of manuscripts to her previous gift of family papers. 
Interesting William Penn material was given by Carroll Frey, and a large 
file of papers relating to the Indian Agency of Enoch Hoag, a Quaker Indian 
agent of the nineteenth century, was presented to the College by Clinton F. 
Hoag, of Muscatine, Iowa. Life magazine gave Haverford a set of photo- 
graphs of the Penn country in England. Francis R. Taylor contributed a 
microfilm of the journal of Jonas Ingham, a revealing document on early 
Pennsylvania Quaker life. A warrant for the arrest of Thomas Story was 
purchased in England. A purchase of even greater interest to Quaker 
historians and genealogists was made possible through the courtesy of the 
Rhode Island Historical Society, which permitted Haverford to secure prints 
of its microfilm of the records of Nantucket Monthly Meeting since 1708. 
These records have since been returned to Nantucket for safekeeping, but 
copies are now accessible both in Providence and at Haverford. 

Two of the most important additions to our Quaker books were made 
by Rufus M. Jones, who presented the Library with a first edition of Wil- 
ham Penn's 7^o Cross 7s[o Crown, published in 1669, and a rare anti-Quaker 
tract of the same year called Canons and Institutions Drawn up and Agreed 
upon By the General Assembly or Meeting of the Heads of the ^ua\ers: 
From all Parts of the Kingdom, at their T^ew-Theatre in Grace church' 
street, in or about January 1 688/89. 

The display space which the new Treasure Room affords was used to 
capacity for special exhibitions, two of which — the WilHam Penn exhibition 
arranged in connection with the celebration of the Penn Tercentenary, and 

[forty-eight 



an exhibition of "Sherlockiana", in conjunction with a "Sherlock Hohties 
meeting" of the Library Associates — attracted more visitors than the 
Treasure Room has ever had before. The Penn exhibition, an account of 
which was given in the Haverford Review, Summer, 1944, was later lent to 
the Bryn Mawr College Library, for display in the Rare Book Room there. 
The Sherlock Holmes exhibit was enriched by a choice selection of books 
from Conan Doyle's own criminological library, lent to the College by the 
Rosenbach Galleries of Philadelphia, and arranged by Professor Edward D. 
Snyder, who described "Sherlock Holmes at Haverford College" in the 
Spring, 1945, number of the Haverford Review. 

Both of these exhibitions brought permanent additions to our collections 
in the form of gifts, Penn items as described above, and "Sherlockiana" from 
Christopher Morley and President Felix Morley, both of whom are members 
of the Baker Street Irregulars. 

The death of Franklin D. Roosevelt was the occasion for exhibiting a 
selection of portraits and autographed letters from the Charles Roberts 
Autograph Collection, of American presidents who have died in office, and 
of the vicc'presidents who succeeded them. Only one autograph was missing 
from the group, that of Harry S. Truman. Perhaps a friend of the College 
can supply that. 

Besides the Sherlock Holmes material, other non-Quaker items have been 
added to our autograph and portrait collection. An interesting early litho' 
graph print of Founders Hall was given to the Library by Murray C. Haines. 
President Morley gave a selection of autograph letters of prominent people 
from his personal files before he resigned, bringing the total of his gifts of 
this kind to 243 items. Margaret Taylor Macintosh added an autograph 
album to her numerous other manuscript gifts, and other donors gave 
autograph letters of prominent public figures such as Lord Halifax, Associate 
Justice Roberts, President Roosevelt, and, finally, Adolf Hitler. This last 
was the gift of Roy A. Vogt, of the Class of 1941, who secured it himself 
in Berlin in 19.^6. 

The Treasure Room has been host to several groups during the year, 
including the Library Associates, the Haverford Township Historical 
Society, and classes from the Baldwin School and the Haverford Friends 
First-day School. Seventeen research students made use of the facilities 
which the Quaker Collection offers, and many inquiries were received and 
answered by mail. Walter Fales continued his work with the voluminous 
records of the American Friends Service Committee, which are housed on 
the fifth floor of the stack. Anna B. Hewitt, Assistant Curator of the 
Quaker Collection, has found time from her many duties to supply duplicate 
Quaker books to a number of other libraries. She also supervised the col- 

forty-nine] 



lection and storage of American Quaker publications for the Friends 
Reference Library in London, until there was no longer any danger of the 
material being sunk in transit. It has now been forwarded to Friends House 
in London, where it will be a welcome addition to the great Quaker library 
there. 

The Curator was appointed to the editorship of the Bulletin of Friends 
Historical Association, an interesting duty which has long been associated 
with Haverford through the work of Isaac Sharpless, Allen C. Thomas, and 
Rayner W. Kelsey. 

A special ''Quaker Collection Committee*" of the Board of Managers, 
William W. Comfort, Francis R. Taylor, and William M. Maier, have 
been most helpful in their advice and assistance, as have also Jonathan M. 
Steere, William A. Battey, Stanley R. Yarnall, and Henry J. Cadbury, to 
mention only a few of the Managers and friends of the College who are 
particularly interested in furthering the work of the Quaker Collection. 
As we look forward to the coming year of peace it is apparent that this work 
will expand in many directions, and the help and guidance of such friends 
will be more than ever appreciated. 

Thomas E. Drake, Curator. 

REPORT OF THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The report of house patients is as follows: 

19444945 1943-1944 

Patients admitted 25 192 

Total time (days) 124 595 

Diseases are classified as follows: 

Grippe and respiratory 4 

Intestinal 10 

Joint conditions 4 

Miscellaneous 7 

Total number of visits of dispensary patients: 

1944-1945 194M944 

Medical 1,490 5,352 

Surgical 723 3,691 

Total 2,213 9,043 

Conditions are classified as follows : 

Upper respiratory 265 

Fractures 1 

Sutures 1 

General 717 

[fifty 



PUBLICATIONS AND ACTIVITIES OF 
THE FACULTY 

1944-1945 

ALLENDOERFER, CARL B. 
Six short reviews of scientific articles. Mathematical Reviews, 6. 1945. 

Consultant to the Office of Field Service, OSRD 

Assigned to Joint Target Group, Headquarters Army Air Forces, Washington, 
D. C. Chief of the Statistical Subsection and Coordinator of Research of the Physical 
Vulnerability Section of the Joint Target Group. Author, co-author, or editor of 
numerous classified documents published by this agency. 

Awarded "Certificate of Merit" by the OSRD. 

BENHAM, THOMAS A. 

Consultant with the Directors of the Valley Forge Hospital, Ward for the Blind. 
Director on the Board of the Alumni Association of the Pennsylvania Institution 
for the Blind in Overbrook. 

Consultant in Electronics for the Arcos Corporation, Philadelphia. 
Research for the Warren Webster Company, Camden. 

CADBURY, WILLIAM E., Jr. 

"The System Sodium ChromatcSodium Molybdate-Watcr". Journal of the 
American Chemical Society, 67:262-8. Feb. 1945. 

Member of Draft Problems Committee, Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

Member of Religious Education Committee, Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

Member of Overseers, Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

Member of Westtown School Committee, under appointment by Philadelphia 
Yearly Meeting. 

Candidate for School Board of Haverford Township on Democratic ticket, sue 
cessful in Primaries, June 1945. 

COMFORT, HOWARD 
"Sovereignty Is the Issue". Human Events, 2, no. 14, April 1945. 
Several entries on Quaker subjects. Perm's Encyclopedia of Religion. 1945. 

Director: Osborne Association; Indian Rights Association; Community Health 
and Civic Association; Main Line Federation of Churches; Richard Humphreys 
Foundation; Pennsylvania Committee on Penal Affairs; Family Society of Phila- 
delphia. 

Member of Delaware County Citizens Committee on Juvenile Delinquency. 

Member of Family Advisory Committee, Delaware County Welfare Council. 

Member of American Friends Service Committee, Committee on Italy. 

Member of American Friends Service Committee, Committee on Conscientious 
Objectors in Prison. 

fifty-one] 



Delegate of American Friends Service Committee, to Italian Committee of Ameri' 
can Council of Volunteer Agencies. 

Member of Friends Council on Education. 

Chairman of Advisory Committee of the local National Association for the Ad' 
vancement of Colored People. 

Secretary of American Academy in Rome, Classical Advisory Council. 

Chairman of American Academy in Rome, Classical Alumni. 

Member of Haverford Meeting Religious Education Committee. 



COMFORT, WILLIAM W. (President, Emeritus) 

"French and German Friends of the Early Nineteenth Century", in Byways in 
Siuaker History, pp. 95-110. Pendle Hill. 1944. 

Editor of: William Pcnn, Fruits of an Active Life, etc. Philadelphia: Friends 
Book Store. 1945. 102 pages. 

"The Penn Centenary in America". Friends Quarterly Examiner, London. 
Tenth Month, 1944, pp. 23 5-41. 

"William Penn's Religious Background". Pennsylvania Magazine of History and 
Biography, 68:341-58. 1944. 

"The Saracens in Italian Epic Poetry". Publications of the Modern Language 
Association, 59:882-910. Dec. 194'^. 

"Influences on William Penn". The Exile Herald, Philadelphia, April 1945, 
pp. 3-12. 

President of the Board, Sleighton Farm School for Girls. 
Overseer of the Penn Charter School. 
President of the Friends Historical Association. 
Member of Council, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 
Member of the Board of Managers, Haverford College. 
Chairman of the Bible Association of Friends in America. 



DRAKE, THOMAS E. 

"Elihu Coleman, Quaker Antislavery Pioneer of Nantucket", in Byways in 
Slua}{er History, A Collection of Historical Essays by Colleagues and Friends of 
William I. Hull, ed. Howard H. Brinton, pp. 111-36. Pendle Hill. 1944. 

"William Penn's Experiment in Race Relations". Pennsylvania Magazine of 
History and Biography, 68:372-87. Oct. 1944. 

Rev. of Theodore Thayer, Israel Pemberton. King of the ^ual^ers, in American 
Historical Review, 50:136-7. Oct. 1944. 

Editor of: Bulletin of Friends Historical Association, beginning with vol. 34, no. 1, 
Spring, 1945. 

Member of the Board of Directors: Friends Historical Association; The Friend 
(Philadelphia); Pendle Hill; Bible Association of Friends in America. 

Member of Friends Council on Education, representing Haverford. 

Chairman of the Draft Problems Committee of Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

Lectures: "William Penn" — New Garden Friends Meeting, October 15, 1944; 
"The Later Periods of Quakerism" — Radnor Friends Meeting, January 21, 1945; 

[fifty-two 



"Abraham Lincoln" — Montgomery School, February 9, 1945; "Collecting Book 
Collectors" — Dinner Meeting of Friends Historical Association, February 22, 1945; 
"A Satisfying Faith" — Haverford Union, February 25, 1945; "Early Haverford" — 
Haverford Township Historical Society, May 26, 1945; "Elihu Coleman and His 
Times" — at the annual meeting of the Nantucket Historical Association, July 31, 
1945. 

DUNN, EMMETT R. 

"Los Generos de Anfibios y Reptiles de Colombia, IIL Las Serpicntes". Caldasia, 
3:155-224. Oct. 1944. 

"Herpetology of the Bogota Area". Revista de la Academia Colombiana de 
Ciencias, 6:68-81. Dec. 1944. 

"A new Caecilian of the genus Gymnopis from Brazil". American Museum 
Novitates, no. 1278, p. 1. Feb. 1945. 

"Los Generos de Anfibios y Reptiles de Colombia, IV. Testudineos y Croco- 
dilinos". Caldasia, 3:307-3 5. April 1945. 

"Reptile Hunting in Colombia".* The Haverford Review, 4:11-13, 34-36. Spring, 
1945. 

Curator of Reptiles and Amphibians, Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. 

FLIGHT, JOHN W. 

Article on History of Alphabet (with Tables), in American Educator Encyclo- 
pedia,. 1945. 

"A Physician Tells Story of Jesu&" (Gospel of Luke), in Presbyterian Society Kit, 
vol. 2, 4 pages. Fall, 1945. 

Abstracts of articles on archaeological subjects in foreign periodicals. American 
Journal of Archaeology. 

Editor of: Proceedings of Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis, in Journal 
of Biblical Literature, 64:1-24. March 1945. 

Associate Editor of: Journal of Bible and Religion. 

Rev. of C. B. Russell, The Path to Reconstruction, in Journal of Bible and Re- 
ligion, pp. 264-5. Nov. 1945. 

GREEN, LOUIS C. 

Rev. of J. B. Sidgwick, Introductory Astronomy, in Review of Scientific Instru- 
ments, 15:265. Oct. 1944. 

Vice-President and Secretary, Rittenhouse Astronomical Society. 

HADDLETON, ALFRED W. 

Official in: Philadelphia High School championships; Junior High School cham- 
pionships, Westchester, Temple University Track Meets; New Jersey Indoor High 
School championships, Camden; Philadelphia Inquirer Meet. 

Member of: Executive Committee, Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Executive Committee, Middle Atlantic States Track Association; Philadel- 
phia Track Officials Qub. 

fifty-three] 



HERNDON, JOHN G. 

Business Developments of 1944. Philadelphia: John C. Winston Co., 1944. 60 
pages. 

"Federal Income Tax Law Applicable to Individuals in 1945". Winston Business 
Administration, 1:M76. 1945. 

Editor of: The Winston Business Digest, vol. 3, nos. 5'6, June-Sept. 1945. 

Member of the Executive Committee, Technical Adviser, and Delegate to the San 
Francisco Conference; Committee of Citizens to Present Philadelphia's Invitation 
to the United Nations to Establish the Seat of the United Nations in Philadelphia. 

Director of the United Nations Council of Philadelphia. 

Director of the International House, University of Pennsylvania. 

Historian of The Society of the War of 1812, Pennsylvania Chapter. 

Lectures on various phases of international obligations of the United States and on 
other governmental matters, delivered to the Y.M.C.A., the League of Women Voters, 
the Civic Club of Philadelphia, the Main Line Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary 
Club, and various Church groups. 

HETZEL, THEODORE B. 

Member of: Work Camp Committee, American Friends Service Committee; Nomi' 
nating Committee, Corporation of Haverford College; Nominating Committee, Haver- 
ford Friends Meeting; Executive Committee, Campus Club of Haverford College; 
Health Committee of the General Committee, Westtown School. 

Chairman of the Hobby Committee, Westtown Alumni Association. 

Vice-Chairman, Society of Automotive Engineers, Philadelphia Section. 

Treasurer of Parent-Teacher Association, Haverford Friends School. 

PNES, RUFUS M. (Emeriius) 

The Radiant Life (in Braille). Los Angeles: Braille Institute of America. 1945. 
2 vols. 

"Beyond the Old Frontiers", in American Pulpit Series, pp. 46-55. New York: 
Abingdon-Cokesbury Press. 1945. 

"The Quaker Conception of Man". The Friends Intelligencer, 102:587-9. Sept. 
15, 1945. 

"The Keepers of the Faith". The American Friend, 33:364-5. Sept. 20, 1945. 

"Thou Shalt Not Hate". The Christian Century, 62:83 5-6. July 18, 1945. 

JONES, THOMAS O. 
Editor and Writer on the Manhattan Project Report of 48 vols. 

LUNT, WILLIAM E. 

History of England, third edition. New York: Harper if Bros. 1945. xvi, 954 
pages. 

Rev. of Sidney Painter, Studies in the History of the English Feudal Barony, in 
Journal of Economic History, 4:220-22. Nov. 1944. 

[fifty-four 



Rev. of R. A. L. Smith, Canterbury Cathedral Priory, in Church History, 14:74-?. 
March 1945. 

Rev. of H. M. Cam, Liberties and CotnTitumties in Medieval England, in Speculum, 
20:244-5. April 1945. 

Associate Editor of: American Historical Review. 

Member of: The Chebeague Council; The Advisory Council of the History De' 
partment, Princeton University. 

Director of Studies in Anglo-Papal Relations during the Middle Ages, Mediaeval 
Academy of America. 

Overseer of Bowdoin College. 

MELDRUM, WILLIAM B. 
Associate Editor of: Journal of the Franklin Institute. 

Member of the Executive Committee, Science Teachers Association. 

Governor, Pennsylvania Chemical Society. 

National Councilor, American Chemical Society. 

Lectures on scientific topics to Norristown Chemical Society and to School groups. 

OAKLEY, CLETUS O. 
An Outline oj the Calculus. New York: Barnes W Noble 1944. 221 pages. 
Rev. of Basic Mathen^attcs for War and Industry, in Review of Scientific Instru- 
ments, 16:88-9. April 1945. 

PALMER, FREDERIC, Jr. (Emeritus) 
"Unusual Rainbows". American Journal of Physics, 13:203-4. June 1945. 
Chairman of Franklin Medal Committee and member of other Committees, Frank- 
lin Institute. 

PEPINSKY, ABRAHAM 
"Musicology, the Stepchild of the Sciences". Journal of the Acoustical Society 
of America, 17:83-6. July 1945. 

Rev. of Alexander Wood, The Physics of Music, in Journal of the Acoustical 
Society of America, 16:129. Oct. 1944. 

Rev. of International Congress of Musicology, in Journal of the Acoustical Society 
of America, 17:89-90. July 1945. 

Conductor of Musical Ensembles, Bryn Mawr Art Center. 

PFUND, HARRY W. 
A History of the German Society of Pennsylvania, Founded 1764. Philadelphia: 
German Society of Pennsylvania. 1944. 38 pagef. 

Member of the Editorial Board, American-German Review, vol. 11, Philadelphia. 
1944-45. 

Reviews in the American-German Review and the German Quarterly. 
Chairman of the Library Committee, German Society of Pennsylvania. 
Made Inventory, with Dr. C. F. Haussmann, of valuable books in the Archives 
of the German Society of Pennsylvania. 

Adviser to the Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation. 

fifty-five] 



POST. L. ARNOLD 
"The Divine in Homer". Croser Quarterly, 22:20-7. Jan. 194?. 
"Arishima at Haverford". Haverford Review, 4: 8' 10. Spring, 194?. 
Rev. of P. W. Harsh, A Handboo\ of Classical Drama, in Qassical Philology, 
40:190-2. July 1945. 

Editor: Loeb Classical Library. 

SARGENT, RALPH M. 

"Art and Letters in Their Relation to Enduring Peace", in Approaches to World 
Peace. New York: Harper and Bros., 1944, pp. 478-85. 

"Sidney's Astrophel and Stella". The News Letter of the College English Assc. 
ciation, 6:1. Jan. 1945. 

Editor of The Haverford Review. 

President of The Highlands Museum and Biological Laboratory, Highlands, North 
Carolina. 

Member of the Executive Council, College English Teachers, Middle Atlantic 
States. 

SNYDER, EDWARD D. 

"Sherlock Holmes at Haverford College". Haverford Review, 4:27-30. Spring, 
1945. 

SPAETH, J. DUNCAN 

"Rowing" (new article), in Encyclopedia Brittanica, American edition. 1945. 

"Epic Conventions in Paradise Lost", in Elizabethan and Other Essays, University 
of Colorado Studies, 2:200-10. Oct. 1945. 

"The Education of Abraham Lincoln". Philadelphia Forum, pp. 6-23. Nov. 1945. 

"The Humanities in Peace and War". Reprint in Bulletin of the American Asso' 
ciation of University Professors (from the Classical Journal), 39:193-200. Jan. 1944. 

STEERE. DOUGLAS V. 

"Meditations. Cincinnati: Methodist Church. 1945. 27 pages. 

Articles on von Hiigel, Evelyn Underbill, Imitation of Christ, Francis de Sales, 
in Ferm's Encyclopedia of Religion. New York: Philosophical. 1945. 

"Kierkegaard in English". Journal of Religion, 24:271-8. Oct. 1944. 

Rev. of The Journal: Second Session of U .J^.R.R.A. Council, in Crozer Quarterly, 
22:375-6. Fall, 1945. 

Rev. of Robert Sencourt, Carmelite and Poet (St. John of the Cross)^ in Journal 
of Bible and Religion, 12:258-9. Nov. 1944. 

Rev. of Eric Hayman, Worship and the Common Life, in Journal of Religion, 
25:219-20. July 1945. 

American Friends Service Committee: Chairman, Work Camp Committee; Vice- 
Chairman, Social-Industrial Section. Member of: Board of Directors; Nominating 
Committee; Foreign Service Executive Committee; Scandinavian Sub-Committee; 

[fifty-six 



Polish Sub-Committee; Foreign Volunteer Work Community Committee; Foreign 
Personnel Training Committee. 

Represented American Friends Service Committee as delegate conducting relief 
investigations and Quaker visitation, June-October, 1945, in Finland, Norway, 
Sweden, Denmark, and Poland. 

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting (Arch Street): Clerk of Yearly Meeting of Ministers 
and Elders; Member of Committee on Church Unity. 

Pendle Hill: Chairman of Curriculum Committee; Member of Board of Directors 
and of Executive Committee of Board of Directors. 

John V/oolman Memorial Associatior\ : Member of Board of Trustees. 

American Theological Society: President, 1945-46 

Lectures: Carew Lectures, Hartford Theological Seminary, February 1945; Flower 
Sermon, Cathedral, St. Louis, Missouri, April 1945; Annual Religious Lectures, Eden 
Theological Seminary, April 1945. 

College Preaching. Cornell, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Vassar, Oberlin, Howard, and 
Syracuse. 

Member of American Committee for Preparing Christian Classics for Translation 
into Chinese. 

STINNES, EDMUND H. 
"European Unification". Human Events. 16 pages. 

"European Economic Unification". Council on Foreign Relations. 20 pages. 
Main Line Forum. 

SUTTON, RICHARD M. 

College Physics (with D. A. Keys, McGill University). Boston: D. C. Heath and 
Co. 1944. 693, vi pages. 

"Report of National Research Council Conference of Physicists". Review of 
Scientific Instruments, 15:283-328. Nov. 1944. 

"Cider from the Newtonian Apple". American Journal of Physics, 13:203. 
June 1945. 

"A Problem and an E.xperiment on Horizontal Acceleration". American Journal 
of Physics, 13:257-60. Aug. 1945. 

Rev. of Brouwer, Keator, and McMillen, Spherographical Navigation, in Review of 
Scientific Instruments, 15:266. Oct. 1944. 

Rev. of Stewart and Pierce, Marine and Air ?S(avigatton, in Review of Scientific 
Instruments, 15:267. Oct. 1944. 

Rev. of C. L. Boltz, Basic Radio, in Journal of Applied Physics, 16:3. March 
1945. 

Rev. of W. S. Landis, Tour Servant the Molecule, in Review of Scientific Instru' 
ments, 16:84. April 1945. 

Rev. of J. Bendick, Electronics for Boys and Girls, in Review of Scientific Instru' 
ments, 16:87. April 1945. 

Articles on Physics in Encyclopedia Brittanica "Junior". 

Editor of Training Manuals and of Summary Reports, N.D.R.C, Division 6. 

Associate Editor, American Journal of Physics. 

fifty-seven] 



Representative of American Association of Physics Teachers to American Council 
on Education. 

Member of: Committee on Science and the Arts, Franklin Institute; Committee 
on the Museum, Franklin Institute; Franklin- Institute Solar Eclipse Expedition to 
Wolseley, Saskatchewan, July 9, 1945; Yearly Meeting Committee for Westtown 
School; Special Yearly Meeting Committee on Education; Committee from the Two 
Yearly Meetings on the "State of the Society"; Monthly Meeting Committee on 
Haverford Friends School. 

Chairman of Monthly Meeting Committee on Religious Education. 

Outside Examiner for Honors in Physics, Swarthmore College, 1945. 

Lectures: "The National Research Council Conference of Physicists" — Optical 
Society of America, New York, October 20, 1944; "Imagination and the Teaching 
of Physics" — U. S. Naval Academy, November 11, 1944; "Newton and His Laws 
of Motion" — Westtown School, January 6, 1945; "Liquid Air" — Haverford Friends 
School, February 7, 1945; "Some Mechanical Curiosities" — American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers, New York, March 7, 1945; "Rotations and Revolutions" — 
Penn Charter School, March 19, 1945; "Spinning Bodies" — Montgomery Country 
Day School, March 22, 1945; "Taking the Sigh Out of Science" — Engineers CluS, 
Philadelphia, May 15, 1945; "Architects and Builders" — Westtown School, May 20, 
1945; "Recreations in Physics" — Lehigh Valley Physics Club, Easton, Pa., June 7, 
1945; "Atomic Bombs and Balms" — Pocono Lake Preserve, August 20, 1945. 

TEAF, HOWARD M., Jr. 

Public Member, War Labor Board, Third Region (Philadelphia). 
Insurance Consultant and Acting Head of Insurance Branch, United Nations 
Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (Washington), December 1944'June 1945. 

WATSON, FRANK D. 

Panel Chairman, War Labor Board, Third Region. 

Hearing Office in the Industrial Disputes Division, War Labor Board, Third Region. 

WYLIE, LAURENCE W. 

Work Camp Director, Hindman, Kentucky, American Friends Service Committee, 
Summer, 1944. 

Member of: Foreign Service Section, American Friends Service Committee; Social- 
Industrial Section, American Friends Service Committee; Work Camp Executive Com' 
mittee, American Friends Service Committee. 




[fifty-eight 



College Offset Press, 43 North 6fh St., Philadelphia 6, Pa 



Haverford College 

I 

Bulletin 




DIRECTORY 



volume XLV 



NUMBER ONE 



October 1946 



1946 




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College Days in heavy-faced type. 



CALENDAR 

1946-1947 

Registration of all new students Sept. 16-17 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 9 a.m.; registra- 
tion of returning students Sept. 18 

First-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m Sept. 19 

Thanksgiving Recess (dates inclusive) Nov. 28-Dec. 1 

First Quarter ends No\'. 27 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Dec. 9 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive) Dec. 22, 1946-Jan. 5, 1947 

First-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduating 

Seniors Jan. 1 1 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations .Jan. 15-18 

First-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors in 

Major Subjects) Jan. 16 

Mid-year Examinations Jan. 20-31 

Second-Semester begins with Registration of all new stu- 
dents, 9 A.M.; approved Second Semester Programs of 

returning students must be filed by 5 p.m Feb. 3 

Second-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m.; Assembly, for all stu- 
dents, 1 1 a.m Feb. 4 

Third Quarter ends Mar. 29 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 30-Apr. 6 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Apr. 29 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts Apr. 29 

Second-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduat- 
ing Seniors May 17 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations May 21-24 

Second-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors 

in Major Subjects) May 22 

Final Examinations May 26-}une 6 

Commencement Day June 7 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1946-1947 

DIRECTORY 

FACULTY AND STAFF 





Residence 


Telephone 






Haverford, unless 


Ardmore, unless 


Name 


otherwise noted 


otherwise noted Office 


(B.M. 


= Bryn Mawr, H. C. = Haverford College) 




Allendoerfer, Carl B. 


7.S0 Rugby Rd., B.M. 


B.M. 2568 J 


Founders, 
Center West 


Archfield, Dorothy B. 


100 Grandview Rd., 








Ardmore, Pa. 


4728 


Founders 


Asensio, Manuel J. 


2 College Lane 


4163 


Founders, West 


Asensio, Elisa 


2 College Lane 


4163 




Beard, Mabel S. 


Infirmary, H.C. 


3036 


Infirmary 


Beatty, Ethel E. 


Founders, H.C. 


9460 


Founders 


Benham, Thomas A. 


3 College Lane 


6044 


Sharpless 14 


Bernheimer, Richard M. 


225 N. Roberts Rd., B.M. 


B.M. 1427 W 


B.M. College 


Berry, Alice M. 


Lincoln Highway, 


Berwyn 






Berwyn, Pa. 


0225 


Roberts, 2nd fl. 


Braatoy, Bjarne 


Government House, H.C. 


9613 


Library 43 


Cadbury, William E., Jr. 


791 College Ave. 


0203 W 


Chem. Lab. 22 


Caselli, Aldo 


1 College Circle 


5562 


Union 


Chatto, Viola 


521 Panmure Rd. 


0693 


Founders 


Comfort, Howard 


5 College Circle 


3732 


Sharpless 40 


Comfort, William W. 


South Walton Road 


0455 




Coogan, Daniel F., Jr. 


336 Brookline Blvd., 


Hilltop 






Havertown, Pa. 


2295 W 


Whitall 8 


Cooper, Bennett S. 


521 Panmure Road 


3254 M 


Founders, East 


Cooper, Michael S. 


4516 Chestnut St., 


Baring 






Phila., Pa. 


2-6208 




Cornell, Charlene D. 


Buck Lane 


2904 


Founders, East 


Crosman, Sara E. 


Griffin Lane 


6220 


Roberts, 2nd fl. 


Davis, Evan 


3730 Locust St., 


Evergreen 






Phila., Pa. 


6-5083 


Whitall 8 


Docherty, William, Jr. 


746 Panmure Road 


B.M 0569 W 


Gymnasium 


Drake, Thomas E. * 


702 Pennstone Rd., B.M. 


B.M. 1534 


Library, 
Treasure Room 


Duisberg, Peter C. 


170 Hansberry St., 


Germantown 






Phila., Pa. 


8-5045 


Chem. Lab. 22 


Dunn, Emmett R. 


748 Rugby Rd., B.M. 


B.M. 2753 


Sharpless 39 


Evans, Arlington 


653 E. Jamestown St., 


Roxborough 






Phila., Pa. 


8-3876 J 


Gymnasium 


Evans, Francis Cope 


1 College Lane 


4049 W 


Sharpless 32 


Fetter, Frank W. 


5 Canterbury Lane, 


Wayne 






St. Davids, Pa. 


2449 J 


Whitall 9 


FitzGerald, Alan S. 


531 Panmure Rd. 


5092 


Sharpless 9 


Flight, John W. 


753 College Ave. 


4409 W 


Sharpless 42 


Foss, Martin 


la College Lane 


1599 


Library 49 


Goldberger, Else 


Crum Creek Farm, 








Goshen Rd., R.F.D. 1, 


Newtown Square 




Newtown Square, Pa. 


0342 W 


Whitall 2 


Green, Louis C. 


791 College Ave. 


4409 J 


Observatory 


Haddleton, Alfred \V. 


20 Tenmore Rd. 


B.M. 1235 W 


Gymnasium 


Harold, Agnes 


322 Farwood Rd., 
Carroll Park 
Phila., 31, Pa. 


5060 


Union 


Henry, Howard K. 


1464 Drayton Lane 








Penn Wynne, Pa. 


3913 J 


Sharpless 31 


Herndon, John G. * * 


1 College Lane 


0364 




Hetzel, Theodore B. 


768 College Ave. 


4393 W 


Hilles, 2nd fl. 


Hewitt, Anna B. 


245 S. 38th St., 


Evergreen 


Library, 




Phila. 4, Pa. 


6-4946 


Treasure Room 



Name 



Hoag, Gilbert T. 
Holmes, Clayton VV. 
Jones, Thomas O. * * 
Jones, Rufus M. 
Kahn, Lessing A. 
Kelly, John A. 
Lester, John A. 
Lockwood, Dean P. 
Lodge, F. Ruth 

Lunt, William E. 
Macintosh, Archibald 
Meade, Edward G. 
Meldrum, William B. 
Oakley, Cletus O. 

Palmer, Frederic, Jr. 
Pepinsky, Abraham 
Pfund, Harry W. * * 

Post, Amy L. 
Post, L. Arnold 
Randall, Roy E. 
Rantz, J. Otto 

Reid, Ira De. A. 
Rittenhouse, Leon H. 
Rogers, Dorean Mary 
Sargent, Ralph M. 
Schroeder, Seaton 

Snyder, Edward D. 
Spaeth, J. Duncan 

Steere, Douglas V. 
Stefan, Marie 

Stulb, Florence B. 

Sutton, Richard M. 

Swan, Alfred 

Taylor, Dr. Herbert W. 
Teaf, Howard M., Jr. 
Ufford, Wilbur C. 
Walter, Barbara L. 

Watson, Frank D. 
White, Gilbert F. 
Williamson, A. Jardine 
Wilson, Albert H. 
Wonson, Gertrude M. 
Wylie, Laurence W. 



Residence 


Telephone 




Haverford, unless 


Ardmore, unless 


otherwise noted 


otherwise noted Office 


= Bryn Mawr, H. C. = Haverford College) 




Woodside Cottage, H.C. 


1402 W 


Roberts, 1st fl. 


720 Millbrook Lane 


4269 W 


HiUes, 1st fl. 
Chem. Lab. 6 


2 College Circle 


2777 




330 S. 4th St., Phila. 6, Pa. 




Sharpless 21 


3 College Lane 


4160 


Whitall 11 


36 Railroad Avenue 


3168 


Chase 3 


6 College Circle 


1402 J 


Library 


1527 Fairfax Rd., 






Rosemont, Pa. 


B.M. 0663 W 


Whitall 5 


5 College Lane 


1507 W 


Whitall 10 


3 College Circle 


0961 


Roberts, 2nd fl. 


214 Bryn Mawr Ave., B.M. 


B.M. 1767 W 


Library 39 


747 College Ave. 


0881 J 


Chem. Lab. 10 


Featherbed Lane 


3109 W 


Founders, 
Center East 


1 College Lane 


6878 




7 College Lane 


5324 


Sharpless 21 


624 Overhill Rd., 






Ardmore, Pa. 


5532 




C-3 Dreycott Apts. 


1643 M 


Library 28 


9 College Lane 


0258 M 


Library 51 


2 Griffin Lane 


4565 W 


Gymnasium 


2122 Chestnut Ave., 






Ardmore, Pa. 




HiUes, Lab. fi. 


Founders Hall, H.C. 


9460 


Library 50 


6 College Lane 


5522 




Woodside Cottage, H.C. 


3109 M 


Union 


4 College Circle 


3339 


Whitall 7 


418 St. Davids Road, 


Wayne 




St. Davids, Pa. 


0224 


Founders 


36 Railroad Ave. 


0712 


Whitall 12 


Upper Gulph Rd., 


Wayne 




Wayne, Pa. 


2244 


Whitall 14 


739 College Ave. 


0162 


Whitall 3 


4837 Cedar Ave., 


Granite 




Phila. 43, Pa. 


2-2845 


Union 


4730 Conshohocken Ave. 


Trinity 




Phila. 31, Pa. 


7-0916 


Roberts, 1st fl. 


785 College Ave. 






facing Walton Rd. 


0742 W 


Sharpless 17 


624 Overhill Rd., 






Ardmore, Pa. 


5532 


Union, Music 


457 Lancaster Ave. 


2383 


Infirmary 


3 College Lane 


4049 J 


Chase 7 


774 Millbrook Lane 


7995 W 


HiUes, 3rd fl. 


5713 W. Ashland Ave., 


Sherwood 




Phila. 43, Pa. 


7-5939 


Roberts, 1st fl. 


773 College Ave. 


2937 


Whitall 6 


1 College Circle 


4642 


Roberts, 2nd fl. 


4 College Lane 


4023 


Founders, West 


765 College Ave. 


1853 




112 Mondela Ave., B.M. 




Roberts, 2nd fl. 


Government House, H.C. 


2163 W 


Library 42 



'Indicates absence during second semester. 
**Indicates absence during whole academic year. 



COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

All telephones below may be reached by calling Aidniore fi400 
iDiless otheriuise noted 

Admissions Office: Archibald Macintosh, Director of Admissions 

Gertrude M. Wonson, Assistant to tlic Dircctf)r of Admissions 
Alumni Office: Bennett S. Cooper, Secretary 
Assistant to the President: Bennett S. Cooper 

Barclay Hall, North ." (Pay Station) . . . <).")0r, 

Barclay Hall, Center (Pay Station) . . .0 159 

Barclay Hall, South (Pay Station) . . .9508 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) : E. R. Dunn. F. C. F.\ans. H. K. Henry 
Bookstore: Else Goldbcrger. Manaii;cr 
Business Office: Aldo Caselli, Comptroller 

Agnes Harold, Secretary to the Comptroller 
Dorean Mary Rogers (Accounts Payable) 
Marie Stefan (Accounts Rccci\ablc) 
Cashier's Office: Marie Stefan 
Chase Hall: John A. Lester, Howard M. Teaf. Jr. 

Chemistry Laboratory: W. E. Cadhury, Jr., P. C. Duisbcrg, \V. B. Mcldrum 
Dean's Office: Gilbert T. Hoag, Dean 

Barl)ara L. Walter, Secrctai\ to the Dean 
Dietitian: Ethel E. Beatty 

Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) : T. B. Hetzel, C. W. Holmes. J. O. Rantz, 

^V. C. Ufford 

Founders Hall, East (Pay Station) . . .9100 

Founders Hall, Dormitory (Pay Station) . . .9.533 

French House: Laurence AV. Wylie, Director . (Pay Station) . . .9013 

Goyernment House: Laurence W. Wylie, Director (Pay Station) . . .9()13 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) . . .9512 

Gymnasiiun Office: \W Docherty, Jr., .\. F.yans. A. W. Haddleton, R. E. Randall 
Ha\erford News 

Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering) 
Infirmary: Herbert W. Taylor, M.D.. College Ph\sician 
Mabel S. Beard, R.X. 

Kitchen (Pay Station) . . . 9511 

Langtiage House: Manuel J. Asensio, Director (Pay Station) . . .9128 

Library: D. P. Lockwood, Librarian 

Amy L. Post, Assistant Librarian 

Circidation Desk 

Treasure Room: Thomas E. Drake, Anna B. Hewitt 
Library Offices: B. Braatoy, M. Foss, E. G. Meade, L. A. Post, Ira Dc. A. Reid, 
L. W. Wylie 

Lloyd Hall. 3rd Entry (Kinscv) Rooms 1-12 (Pay Station) . . .9520 

Lloyd Hall. 5th Entry (Strawi)ridge) Rooms 13-26 (Pav Station) . . .9514 

Lloyd Hall, Sth Entry (Leeds) Rooms 27-38 (Pay Station) . . .9628 

Maintenance and Operation Oflicc: Seaton Schroeder. Superintendent 

Viola Chatto, Secretary to the Superintendent 

Merion Annex ' . (Pay Station) . . .9.561 

Merion Hall (Pay Station) . . . 9 158 

Obseryatory: Louis C. Green 

Panmure Road — 521, Dormitory (Pay Station) . . .9516 

Panmure Road — 740, Dormitory (Pay Station) . . .Bryn Mawr 9275 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) : T. A. Benham! R. M. Sutton 
Placement Bureau: Bennett S. Cooper, Director 

Power House (Pay Station) . . .95 10 

President: Gill^ert F. White 

President's Office: Alice M. Berry, Secretary to the President 

Publicity Director: Bennett S. Cooper 

Radio Club: Station WHAV (Hayerford Union) (Pay Station) . . .5012 

7 



COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

All telephones Iielow may be reached by calling Ardmore 6400 
unless otherwise noted 

Registrar's Office: Margaret R. Coggeshall, Florence B. Stulb 

Research Laboratory: Alan S. FitzGerald, Director (Pay Station) . . .5092 

Sharpless Hall: T. A. Benham, H. Comfort, E. R. Dunn, F. C. Evans, 

A. S. FitzGerald, J. W. Flight, H. K. Henry, L. A. Kahn, 
A. Pepinsky, R. M. Sutton 
Veterans' Counsellor: Howard Comfort (Whitall Hall 5) 

F. Ruth Lodge, Secretary to the Veterans' Counsellor 
Vice President: Archibald Macintosh 

Sara E. Crosman, Secretary to the Vice President 
Whitall Hall: H. Comfort, D. F. Coogan, Jr., Evan Davis, F. W. Fetter. 

E. Goldberger, J. A. Kelly, W. E. Lunt, R. M. Sargent, E. D. Snyder, 
J. D. Spaeth, D. V. Steere, F. D. Watson 

COLLEGE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

When there is an operator at the switchboard (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, none Sunday) any of the offices 
listed below can be reached by calling Ardmore 6400. 

When there is no operator on duty, use the foUo^ving telephone number: 

Ardmore 6400 Library; Maintenance and Operation Office 

Ardmore 6401 Dean; Comptroller 

Ardmore 6402 Hilles Laboratory; Physics Laboratory 

Ardmore 3036 Infirmary 

Ardmore 3761 President's Office 

Ardmore 1942 Vice President; Director of Admissions 

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONES 

The offices of most of the members of the Faculty may be reached by calling 
Ardmore 6400 during the hours when there is an operator at the switchboard. 



DIRECTORY 
STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory room: 

Be for Barclay Center L.H. for Language House 

D7i for Barclay North ' L. for Lloyd Hall 

Bs for Barclay South M.A. for Merion Annex 

Bc.T.W. for Barclay Center Tower, West M. for Merion Hall 

Bc.T.E. for Barclay Center Tower, East 521 for Panmure Road 

F. for Founders Hall 746 for Panmure Road 
G.H. for Government House 

(NOTE: The number preceding 521, 746, M.A., and M. indicates the room occu- 
pied by the student.) 
Name Home Address College Address 

A 

ACKER, George Nicholas Day 

New Oxford, Pa. 

Local Address: 28 Cricket Ave., Ardmore, Pa. 
ACTON, John Thomas 50 Bn 

Buck Road, Br)n .'\thyn. Pa. 
ADAMS, James Fowler. Jr 35 L 

2900 Harrison Street, Wilmington 270, Del. 
ADDOMS, Jeremy Day 

25 Hilltop Road, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. 
AGNEW, Robert Lewis Day 

1133 Patton Avenue, Springfield, 111. 

Local Address: Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 
ALDEN, Charles Seymour Day 

8 Craigie Street, Caml:)ridge Mass. % Mrs. Murray P. Horwood 

Local Address: 225 Roberts Road. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

% Dr. Richard M. Bcrnheimer 

Telephone: Bryn Mawr 3029-R 
ALENICK, Monroe Edward 37 L 

292 Eastern Parkway, Newark 6, N. J. 
ALLEN, Robert Walker Day 

Buck Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
ALLINSON, Andrew Prevost 7 L 

Town's End Farm, West Chester, Pa. 
AMBLER, William Webster, Jr Day 

1635 DeKalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Local Address: 2936 Rising Sun Road, Ardmore, Pa. % Mr. John Mercer 

Telephone: Ardmore 1 t38-W 
AMUSSEN, Christopher Robin 32 Be 

125 Kenwood Avenue, Chevy Chase, Md. 
ANDERSON, John Dickson . . .' 8 F 

580 Second Street, Butler, Pa. 
ATKESON, Timothy Breed 33 Be 

3673 Upton Street, N. W., Washington 8, D. C. 
AUSTAD, Ragnar 10-521 

Mjondalen, Norway 

B 
BACON, Roger 30 F 

3307 Clarendon Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
BAER, Bruce Lawrence 31L 

738 Gimghoul Road, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
BAILEY, MosES Omar 17 L 

160 N. Main Street, West Hartford 7, Conn. 

9 



Name Home Address College Address 

RAIR, Gkorgk Eldriik;k MM 

Siuyvesant, N. Y. 
RAKER, Elwood Tate 19 Bs 

37-23 83rcl Street, Jackson Heights, L. I., N. Y. 
BAKER, RoBKRT Knoche 1 1 M 

355 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton, Pa. 
BAKER, William Perrin, Jr 23 L 

355 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton, Pa. 
B.\LDI, Virgil Bismark, Jr 19 1" 

437 W. School Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BALDWIN, Gordon Brewster 23 Bs 

Orchard Glenn, R. D. 1, Rochester 10, N. Y. 
BARKER, Harold Joseph, Jr 51 Bn 

201-30th Street, Brigantine, N. J. 
BARKER, William Pierson, U 21 L 

1553 Shorb Avenue, N. W., Canton 3, Ohio 
BARRAT, Bernard John 12-521 

54 Avenue de Neuilly, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France 
BARRAZA, Carlos ' 70 Bn 

Donato Guerra 315 S, Torreon, Coah, Mexico 
BARRON, Daniel Aloysius 5 M 

13 W. Bertsch Street, Lansford, Pa. 
BARROWS, William Monroe 24 Bs 

24 Willard Street, E. Braintree 84, Mass. 
BASSERT, David Erisman 5 F 

118 Island Avenue, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 
BASSLER, Carl Bruce '. Day 

Ainsworth Iowa 

Local Address: Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 
BEAULIELT, Charles Emile Day 

27 Hooker Street, Pitkin Homes, E. Hartford, Conn. 

Local Address: 1011 Roosevelt Avenue, Manoa, Pa. % Mrs. Muller 

Telephone: Hilltop 6209 
BECK, Stuart Morgan 14 L 

3900 Cathedral Avenue, N. W., Washington 16, D. C. 
BECKLEY, Addison Summers ." 3-746 

277 S. Douglas Avenue, Springfield, Ohio 
BEEKEN , Warren Lazell 5 1 Bn 

150 Beaver Street, Beaver, Pa. 
BEHRENS, Robert Herman Day 

4042 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BENNETT, Piter Goldthwait 9 F 

82 Washington Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
BERNSTEIN, Daniel Seymour 37 L 

3700 Hilton Road, Baltimore 15, Md. 
BETSON, Robert Boyd Day 

239 Crawford Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
BETSON, Wesley Rhodes Day 

239 Crawford Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
BILLO, Joseph Geoffrey 6 Bs 

11 Axtell Drive, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
BLNGHAM, Jules Mer. Annex 3id Fl. 

63 Wall Street, New York 21, N. Y. 
BIRDS ALL, Joseph Cooper, Jr 7 L 

139 Booth Lane. Haverford, Pa. 
BISHOP. William Spoiswood 1-716 

226 Greenwood Road, Sharon Hill, Pa. 
BLAKE, Frederick Leichton 9 L 

202 W. Beech tree Lane, Wayne, Pa. 
BLASllJS, Leslie Gordon 4 L 

529 Wyoming Avenue, Millburn, N. J. 

10 



Name Homo Address College Address 

BLUM, David Meyer 37 L 

3603 Forest Park Avenue, Baltimore 16, Md. 
BOCK, Gerhard Patrick Day 

706 Merion Avenue, Havertown. Pa. 
BOGER, John Neil 69 Bn 

341 Cumberland Street, Leljanon, Pa. 
BOND, Carl Taylor 6 L 

4 Walnut Street, Bristol, N. H. 
BOTELER, Charles Magdf.fr au, f r 32 Be 

4600 Sedgwick Street, N. W., AVashington, D. C. 
BOUZARTH, William Francis, II 22 L 

635 Belair Avenue, Aberdeen, Md. 
BOWDEN, Robert L Day 

732 Railroad Avenue. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
BOYD, Andrew, Jr '. 56 Bn 

6840 W. Barnett Lane, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
BRENES, Luis Guillermo 66 Bn 

San Jose, Costa Rica 
BREWER, Paul Clisby, Jr L.H. 

36 Hamilton A\enue, Auburn. N. Y. 
BRICK, Allan Randall 23 Bs 

239 W. Glen Avenue, Ridgewood, X. J. 
BRODHEAD, Charles Daniel 10 F 

621 Rising Sun Avenue, Philadelphia 10, Pa. 
BRONNER, Edwin Blair Day 

229 N. 18th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BROOM, William Thomas 22 Bs 

7031 Boyer Street, Philadelphia 19. Pa. 
BROUS, Norman Scattergood Day 

118 E. Gorgas Lane, Philadelpliia 19. Pa. 
BROWX. Edwin Louis 23 Bs 

20 Griffing Boulevard, Asheville, X. C. 

BROWN, Joseph Ei'Es, III 102 M.A. 

Southwest Harbor, Me. 
BROWX, Robert Edwin 35 Be 

22 Woodbine Avenue, Larchmont, N. Y. 
BROW^NLEE, Harold Joseph, Jr 24 Bs 

Quaker Oats, Ltd., Southall, Middlesex. England 
BROWNLEE, John Erskine 38 L 

Quaker Oats, Ltd., Southall, Middlesex. England 
BUCKLEY, James Coakley 18 L 

620 Shadeland Avenue, Drexel Hill. Pa. 
BULLOCK, John Robert 113-115 M.A. 

418 S. 47th Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
BUSH, John Hathaway 8 L 

4901 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 
BUTTRICK. David Gardner 1 L 

21 E. 79th Street, New York, N. Y. 

C 

CADBURY. Warder Henry 18 F 

7 Buckingham Place, Cambridge. Mass. 
CALHOUN, Crede Crespi 17 Bs 

Box 194. Balboa Heights, Canal Zone 
CAN AN, James Franklin G.H. 

1803 Third Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 
CAN AN, Lawrence Henderson, Jr G.H. 

1803 Third Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 
CARMAN, John Braisted 26 Be 

40 W. Hyatt Avenue, Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 
CARRINGTON, George Cabell. Jr 28 Bn 

3715 Woodley Road, N. W., Washington 16. D. C. 

11 



Name Home Address College Address 
CARROLL, John MacGregor G.H. 

468 Riverside Drive, New York City 
CARTIER, George Thomas Day 

248 Conestoga Road, % Lowry, Wayne, Pa. 
CARY, John Richard Day 

627 Walnut Lane, Haverford. Pa. 
CASE, Ward Calvin 25 L 

2512 Dryden Road, Columbus, Ohio 
GATES, Paul Barker 26 Be 

East Vassalboro, Me. 
CHAPMAN, William Dewson G.HL 

Wellesley Farm, Sutton-West, Ontario, Canada 
CHEYETTE, Herbert Basil 28 Be 

646 Locust Street, Indiana, Pa. 
CLARK, Donald Engle Day 

122 Ardmore Avenue, Ardmo'.e, Pa. 
CLARK, William Richmond 22 Bs 

Box No. 81, Williamstown, Mass. 
CLAYTON, Robert Francis, Jr 3 L 

49 E. Providence Road. Lansdowne, Pa. 
CLEMENT, Frederick Tomson 8 L 

407 Woodland Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 
CLOS, John Pulver 14 M 

95-A Glenwood Avenue, Jersey City. X. J. 
COALE, Edgar Bellville 15 M 

521 E. Mermaid Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 
COLE, Don Hagler 52 Bn 

1210 E. 19th Street, Tulsa, Okla. 
COLKET, Tristram Coffin, 3rd 4 L 

835 Mt. Moro Road, Villa Nova, Pa. 
COLLIER, Reginald Bruce 61 Bn 

7 Negus Street, Webster, Mass. 
COLLINS, Benjamin McVickar 2 F 

Broadlea Farm, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 
COLMAN, George Dickson 53 Bn 

159 Chapin Street, Binghamton, N. Y. 
COOPER, Brooks Baxter Day 

521 Panmure Road, Haverford, Pa. 
COOPER, Everett Bruen Day 

115 E. 5th Avenue, Conshohocken, Pa. 
COPE, Paul Markley 9-521 

Hotel Morton, Atlantic City, N. J. 
COPE, Walter Harvey Day 

Hotel Morton, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Local Address: 768 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

% Dr. Theodore Hetzel 
CORNELL, Edward Hussey Binns Day 

Buck Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
COUCH, Richard Arden G.H. 

601 Clearview Avenue, Pittsburgh 5. Pa. 
COWAN, William Edgar 9-746 

3220 Cove Road, Merchantville, N. }. 
CROLIUS, Thomas Potter ' Day 

The Manor, Alden Park, Philadelphia, Pa. 
CROSMAN, Dorland Loring Day 

736 Railroad Avenue. Bryn Mawr. Pa. 
CULBERT, Craig Dunlap Day 

26 Chatham Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
CUNNINGHAM. Bradley, III 12 M 

3509 "O" Street, N. \V., Washington. D. C. 

12 



Name Home Address College Address 

D 

DAUDON, Marc Daniel 17 L 

623 Walnut Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
DAVENPORT, Robert Montgomery Day 

1825 Green Street, Philadelphia 30, Pa. 
DAVIES, David Elwyn 12-521 

3012-44th Street, N. W., Washington 16, D. C. 
DAVIS, Alan Marvin 4 Bs 

1401 Beach 28th St., Far Rockaway, N. V. 
DAVIS, John Gilman 13 L 

76 Brooks Street, West Mcdford, Mass. 
DEITSCH, Peter Herbert 6 L 

Ritz Tower, Park Avenue at 57th Street, New York City, N. Y. 
DEITZ, James Gilbert 53 Bn 

135 Bompart Avenue, Webster Grove 19, Mo. 
DELP, William Taylor 10 L 

520 Derstine Avenue, Lansdale, Pa. 
DE MARCO, Michael Charles Day 

7201 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia 26, Pa. 
DE SCHWEINITZ, George Lord, Jr 14 L 

R. D. 2, Bethlehem, Pa. 
DI GIOVANNI, Carmen Day 

1036 Montgomery Avenue, Narberth, Pa. 
DI PHILLIPO, Anthony John Day 

26 Edgemont Avenue, Clifton Heights, Pa. 
DISBROW, Donald Willis 72 Bn 

R. D. 3, Dundee, N. Y. 
DOANE, John Winthrop 4 G.H. 

316 Stanwood Street, Philadelphia 11, Pa. 
DOANE, Robert Fay 37 Be 

127 Harrison Avenue, Glenside, Pa. 
DORN, Richard Kenneth Day 

6140 Nassau Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
DOWNING, George Valentine, Jr 103 M.A. 

427 Market Street, Salem, Va. 
DRAGSTEDT, Lester Reynold, II 53 Bn 

5200 Greenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
DRAKE, Charles Daniel 14 L 

47 Main Street, Franklin, N. J. 
DURLING, James Alger 27 L 

154 Main Street, Wadsworth, Ohio 
DVORKEN, Henry Jacob 14 F 

435 W. 5th Avenue, Roselle, N. J. 
DYER, Kimball Decker 13 Bs 

14114 Grandmont Road, Detroit, Mich. 
DYSON, John Colter 52 Bn 

1426 Harlem Boulevard, Rockford, 111. 

E 

EASTMAN, Albert Theodore 52 Bn 

1544 Columbus Avenue, Burlingame, Calif. 
ECHIKSON, Edward .* 33 L 

31 Midland Boulevard, Maplewood, N. J. 
EDGERTON, Charles Willis, Jr .30 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
EDGERTON, Hugh McIlvain Be T.E. 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
EDGERTON, Robert 2 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
EDMONDS, Thomas Hartley 61 Bn 

Box 225, Goldens Bridge, N. Y. 

13 



Name Home Address College Address 
ELKIXGTOX, PiiiFR West Day 

6514 Germ:into\vn Avenue, Philadelphia 19, Pa. 
ELLIOTT, R Ai I'M Mf.n(;i:s 3-746 

19 Grace Court, Brooklyn, X. \. 
ESTEY, John Siii-rm w . . .'. 5 L 

Overbridge Earni, Ephrata, Pa. 

F 

FALTERMAVER, Edmund Kasi. G.H. 

46 E. Gowen Avenue, Philadelphia. Pa. 
FEIL, John Philh- 2-746 

Alger Court. Rronxville, X. \. 
FEROE, Bar roN Ki \ m th Day 

213 Marlboro Road, .\rdniore. Pa. 
FEROE, Richard Aian 6 Bs 

327 Highland Road, Pottstoun. Pa. 
FLAHERTY, Joseph Paul, Jr 12-521 

286 Trent Road, Penn Wvnne, Pa. 
FLEMING, Thomas Talhot.' 21 L 

E. Valley Green Road. Flourtown. Pa. 
FLETCHER. Richard McCliirc 58 Bn 

3112 "O" Street. X. W.. Washington 7, D. C. 
FLINT, Peter Boone 60 Bn 

61 W. 9th Street. Xew York 11. X. Y. 
FOSTER. jAMi s Henry 1 1 L 

88 Blake Road, Hanulcn, Conn. 
FOX, Samuel Tucker, "rd Day 

164 Pennsyhania Axenue. Br\ n Maxvr, Pa. 
FREEMAN, Murray Fox Day 

Thistle Run, Gladwvn, Pa. 
FRIEDRICH, Gerhard Gunter 23 F 

49 Kenilworth Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

G 

G AGER, Forrest Lee, Jr Day 

719 E. Willow Gro\e .Avenue, Philadelphia. Pa. 
GAILEY, John Robert. Jr 37 Be 

401 Roosevelt Avenue. .\pt. A., York, Pa. 
GARDXER, Kenneth Adelman 12 L 

2214 Forest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
GARRETT, Philip Cresson, II ' 36 Be 

Lincoln Highway, Malvern, Pa. 
GATELY, Edward Joseph, )r 11 L 

476 Fair Street, Providence 5, R. 1. 
GEBHARDT, John Frank 15 L 

140 E. 29th Street, Erie, Pa. 

GEIGES, Charles Kirkwood 21 F 

124 Hastings Avenue. I'pper Darbv. Pa. 
GEOFFROY, Charles HENR^ 19 L 

509 Wilde Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
GERLACH, Thomas Bradfifld 68 Bn 

1526 N. 15th Street. Philadelphia. Pa. 
GILBERT, Charles Edward 61 Bn 

3 Gleudale .4venue, Delmar, X. Y. 
GILMOUR, Richard Malcolm 33 Be 

249 Green Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
GINSBURG, Silas Jay 7 M 

5317 N. 16th Street. Philadclpin'a. Pa. 
GOOD, Anson Bixli r 1 1-521 

141 Snider Avenue, Wavncsboro, Pa. 

GOODMAN, 1. Robert. 12 F 

3749 Nortonia Road, Baltimore 16, Md. 

14 



Name Huiiif Addre.ss College Address 
GORHAM, Wii.i.iAAi Kane, III •. . 10 M 

3316 Tildcn Street, Philadelphia 29, Pa. 
GOULD, Sr ANLiv Benton 12 L 

3505 Edge^\ol)d Road, Baltimore, Md. 
GRAFF, Thomas D()U(;las 9-746 

Sugar town Road. Paoli, Pa. 
GRAHAM, Roland Boswill. Ju Day 

7802 Lincoln Drive. Phihidelphia 18, Pa. 
GRAHAME, Edward Li nnox G.H. 

6411 Grays Avenue. Philadelphia. Pa. 
GREENWALD. Stanley Morton 21 F 

2847 N. 22nd Street, Philadelphia 32. Pa. 
GRIER, Jesse 38 Be 

134 Irwin Avenue, Ben Avon, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
GRISTE, Richard DeHavi a Day 

6111 Lebanon Avenue, Philadelphia 31, Pa. 
GROSHOLZ, James Richard Day 

% J. D. Burnham, Radnor and Ciulph Roads, Wayne, Pa. 
GROSSMAN, Alfred Durant 35 Be 

10 Wakeman Place, Larchniont, N. Y. 

H 

HAGNER, George \Vills, |r Day 

251 W. Harvey Street, Philadeli^hia 44, Pa. 
HAMILTON, Richard Truitt Day 

856 County Line Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
HAMMOND, Stanley George Be T.E. 

104 Park Road, Llanerch, Pa, 
HAND. Thom.\s Spencer 54 Bn 

1 Holmcrest Road, Jenkintown. Pa. 
HANDY, Edward Haven, Jr L.H. 

19 Bradford Street, Needham, Ma,ss. 
HARDEN, David Stewart 30 L 

341 E. Main Street, Moorestoun, N. J. 
HARDEN, Robert Schf.rmerhorn 30 L 

341 E. Main Street, Moorestoun, N. J. 
HARKINS, Richard Stewart 8 M 

6208 N. 6th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
HARPER, Lee Richard 50 Bn 

190 Crowell Avenue, Staten Island 2. N. Y. 
HARPER, Robert 24 L 

190 Crowell Avenue, Slalcn Island 2, N. Y. 
HARRER, John Morrison Day 

7138 Cresheim Road, Mt. .\irv, Pliiladcli)hia. Pa. 
HARRER, Susan Smith Day 

7138 Cresheim Road, Mt. Airv, Philadelphia, Pa. 
HARRIS, William Hamilton 34 L 

204 N. 17th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
HARVEY, Randolph Charles 19 L 

112 Chamounix Road, St. Davids, Pa. 

HASTINGS, David Spencer 69 Bn 

79 Connecticut A^e^ue, Kensington, Md. 
HAUSER, John Norman 36 L 

7443 Oakhill Avenue. Wainvatosa, Wis. 
HAWKINS, Lee Wveth 20 L 

4949 Quebec Street, N. ^V., Washington. D. C. 
HAYES, Donald Day 

113 Sharon Avenue. f:ollingdalc. Pa. 

HAZELWOOD, Roberi Nichols 25 L 

3405 N. Hackett Avenue, .Milwaukee 11, Wis. 

15 



Name Home Address College Address 
HEALEY, Robert Joseph Day 

Bryn Mawr Gables, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
HEBERTON, Craig, 3rd Day 

182 Lakeside Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
HENDERSON, Robert Earl 29 L 

306 Lincoln Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 
HENDON, Robert Randall L.FL 

1208 N. Pitt Street, Alexandria, Va. 
HENKELS, John Bernard, 3rd L.H. 

446 Church Lane, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 
HENKELS, Paul MacAllister, II 26 L 

446 Church Lane, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 
HENNE, John Kraffert 32 L 

332 W. Oak Street, Titusville, Pa. 
HERMAN, David Ovenden 28 Be 

5510 Roland Avenue, Baltimore 10, iMd. 
HERTER, Theophilus John Day 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. 
HICKMAN, HoYT Leon 29 L 

829 Osage Road, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 
HILL, Robert White L.H. 

84 Kenilworth Avenue, Garrett Park, Md. 
HOBART, John Hampden 66 Bn 

11 Oldfield Avenue, Apt. 6, Montreal, Canada 
HOFFMAN, George L., Jr 1-746 

301 S. Linden Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
HOLLINGSHEAD, Irving, Jr 67 Bn 

309 Chestnut Street, Moorestown, N. J. 
HOLMES, Robert William Day 

720 Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
HOOD, Henry German, Jr G.H. 

3308 Warden Drive, Philadelphia 29. Pa. 
HOOPES, John Robison, Jr Be T.W. 

5500 Moorland Lane, Bethesda, Md. 
HOPKINS, Frank Thomas 12 L 

316 Thornhill Road, Baltimore 12, Md. 
HOSKINS, Robert Graham L.H. 

86 Barick Road, Waban 68, Mass. 
HOUGH, William Jarrett Hallowell, Jr 24 L 

60 E. Butler Avenue, Ambler, Pa. 
HOWE, Gerald Shropshire 109-1 1 1 M.A. 

1038 31st Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
HUGHES, Charles Martin 21 b-F 

321 E. Second Street, Lansdale, Pa. 
HUME, Harry Alan Day 

550 Beverly Road, Upper Darby, Pa. 
HUTCHINSON, Ernest Charles Day 

101 Grandvievv Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

I 

IMHOF, Lawrence George 50 Bn 

678 Richmond Road, Staten Island 4, N. Y. 

J 

JACKSON, Ralph Barnes 13 M 

28 Grove Street, Adams, Mass. 
JACOB, James Archibald, Jr 21 L 

1310 Pleasant Avenue, Wellsburg, W. Va. 
JACOBS, Denhoi.m Muir Day 

Crum Creek Farm, Devon, Pa. 

16 



Name Home Address College Address 

JACOBS, George Wayne, Jr 5-746 

% Mrs. L. R. Kinnard, 25 Fifth Avenue, New York 
JAMESON, Thomas Edward 2-746 

505 N. Lake Street, Carlsbad, N. M. 
JAMISON, Edgar Merritt, Jr 60 Bn 

11 Canterbury Court, Toledo 6, Ohio 
JOHNSON, James Dexter 5 L 

250 S. Brentwood, Clayton, Mo. 
JOHNSON, Lewis Marshall 1 1 Bs 

R. R. 2, Box 263, Jeflersontown, Ky. 
JOHNSON, Richard Schai-er 31 L 

328 W. 22nd Street. Erie, Pa. 
JOHNSON, Victor Lawrence 13 L 

1007 Valley Road, Melrose Park, Pa. 
JOHNSTON, Robert James, Jr Day 

510 W. Montgomery Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
JONES, Aldred Wilson 30 Be 

616 Regester Avenue, Baltimore 12, Md. 
JONES, Arthur Edward 32 Be 

139 Ellis Road, Haver town. Pa. 
JONES, Corson Be T.E. 

9 Hesketh Street, Chevy Chase, Md. 
JONES, Evan Gordon Newton L.H. 

Hectors River P. O., Jamaica, B. W. 1. 

K 

KATZ, John Zadoch 33 L 

2609 Talbot Road, Baltimore !fi, Md. 
KELLY, Paul Sherwood 15 L 

118 W. 36th Street. Erie, Pa. 
KENNEDY, Francis Richard. Jr 38 Be 

810 High Street, Paris, Ky. 
KIMMICH, Homer Marshall Day 

505 Lancaster Avenue, Havt rloicl, Pn. 
KINDLER, Don 1 L 

Jessups, Md. 
KING, Milton Paul Day 

2509 N. 31st Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
KIRK, Robert Louis 5 Bs 

20 W. Baltimore Avenue, Media. Pa. 
KIRKPATRICK, Richard Bruci 4 F 

206 Oak Street, Butler, Pa. 
KLEIN, Edwin Benedict, Jr 5 Bs 

231 Bedford Road, Pleasant\ille, X. Y. 
KLEIN, Gilbert Wood Day 

Mt. Pleasant Avenue and Panorama Road, Villa Nova. Pa. 
KLEIN , Robert Anderson 5 Bs 

231 Bedford Road, Pleasaniviilc, X. Y. 
KNOWLTON, Andrew Mutch Day 

126 Sharon Avenue, Sharon Hill, Pa. 
KONOWITZ, David Bernard 7 M 

85-21 Homelawn Street, Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 

I. 

LAITY, David Sanford 68 Bn 

105 Elliott Place, East Orange, X. J. 
LAITY, Richard Warren 69 Bn 

105 Elliott Place. East Orange, X. [. 
LAITY, Walter Asbury ! G.H. 

105 Elliott Place, East Orange, X. j. 
LAMBERT, Richard Meredith 15 F 

104 Webster Avenue, Wyncote, Pa. 

17 



Nnmc Homf Addrciis C(jllcge Address 
LANGSTON, i homas Dinsmore Day 

621 Malvern Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
LARSON, John Wai.ti r 1-746 

87 E. jessamine Avenue, St. Paid, Miini. 
LASDAY, Harrison Robi rt 27 L 

1322 Sq. Hill Avenue, Pittsljurgh, Pa. 
LASH, William Stanley Mallory 22 F 

R. R. 1, Fonthill, Ontario, Canada 
LAWTON, Mortimi R Povvixl Day 

1301 Durand Drive, Atlanta, Ga. 

Local Address: 785 College Avenue, HaNcrloid, Pa. 

% Dr. Richard M. Sutton 
LEA, Sperry 1-746 

Lake Success, N. Y. 
LEAMAN, George Arthi r L.H. 

40 Fifth Avenue, Apt. 7d, New ^'ork Citv, N. Y. 
LEE, William Marshall 10 L 

21 Park Lane, E. Walpole, Mass. 
LENTON, Charles Trewartha, Jr Day 

1725 N. Edgewood Street, Philadelphia. Pa. 
LESLIE, Alexander Moir L.H. 

116 E. 53rd Street, New York 22, \. \. 

LEUCHTER, Ben Zion 3 L 

East Park Avenue, Vincland, X. J. 
LEVINSON, Henry Walter ' 1 L 

4724 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
LI, Ta-Kuang Day 

285 Riverside Drive, New York 25, New York 

Local Address: 322 Locust Avenue. Archuoie. Pa. % Mrs. MacConncI 
LIGHTEN, William Lewis Day 

205 W. Tulpehocken Street, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 

Local Address: Swarthmore C'ollege. Swartinnorc, Pa. 
LIMBER, Wayne Steven.son 67 Bn 

166 Elm Street, Montpelier, \i. 
LIND, INGE-ROLV 42 Bs 

Valkyriegt 21.4, Oslo, Norway 
LINTHICUM, William Abner. Jr 58 Bn 

110 S. Washington Street, Rock\illf. .\!d. 
LONG ACRE, Jacob Andrews 7-746 

115 N. Reading Avenue, Boyertown, Pa. 
LONGSTRETH, Frank Hoover Day 

31 Railroad Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
LORENTZEN, Richard Peter 1 Bs 

4601 Waveland Court, Des Moines, Iowa 
LUCAS, Robert Moreland 28 L 

Main Street, Cedervillc, N. J. 
LUCINE, Andrew Deran Day 

Centennial Road, Penn Vallev, Philadelphia 27, Pa. 
LYCETT, Isaac C.-vte, Jr 13 Bs 

"Seldom Come By," Owings Mills, Md. 
LYNCH, Harold Vincent. Jr 25 Be 

7203 Cresheim Road, Piiiladclphia, Pa. 

M 

Macintosh, Walter Bruc:e, Jr 13 Bs 

AUentown, Pa, 
MAGILL, Donald Adair 34 Be 

117 Carpenter Lane, Mt. Airv, Phikidoliihia, Pa, 

MANWILLER. Karl Samuel, Jr. 60 Bn 

654 Arhor Road, Ycadon, Pa. 

18 



Xnnie Homp Adclrrss Collecp Addipss 
MAQLJINAY. RobilRT 6-7 in 

% H. Atwood. 30 Rotkclcllcr Pl:i/;i. Room 2213, \cw York 20, N. Y. 
MARONEY, Philip Marvfl Dav 

437 Berkley Road, Haver ford, I'a. 
MARTIN, Donald Beckwith Day 

2948 Oakford Road, Aidmorc, Pa. 
MARTIN, Frank Bucha, Jr 20 F 

822-15th Avenue, Prospect Park, Pa. 
MARVIN, Cloyd 14 M 

2601-30th .Street, N. W.. Washington. D. C. 
MASON, Samuel, 3rd ' 40 Be 

Darlington, Md. 
MASSEY, Parke Duncan I 1 l-llfi M.A. 

143 E. 60th Street, New York, N. Y. 
M ATEER, George Diehl, Jr Dav 

2932 Rising Sun Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
MATLACK, Charles William G.H. 

King's Highway, Moorestown, N. }. 
McCANDLISS, Donald Henry 1-746 

Station A, Trenton, N. J. 
McCLOUD, John Madison Day 

% Dr. Howard Comfort, .5 College Circle, Havcrford. Pa. 
Mcdonald, frank Hill Day 

601 Brookstown Avenue, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Local Address: Pendle Hill. Wallini;ford, Pa. 
McGUIRE, Charles Robison Be T.E. 

3310 Warrington Road, Shaker Heights. Ohio 
McILHENNY, William John .Day 

6822 Rodney Street, Philadelphia 38, Pa. 
McKINLEY, Richard Smallbrook, III 9-746 

Arnold Inn, Northampton, Mass. 
McLaughlin, John Gerald, Jr 9 L 

10 Lowell Avenue, Floral Park, N. Y. 
MEAD, George Nathaniel Jackson Day 

2006 Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
MELCHIOR, Charles Montfort Day 

240 W. Montgomery Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
MELDRUM, Donald Nichol Day 

747 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
METCALFE, 'Rich.\rd John 1 1 L 

397 May Street, Worcester, Mass. 
MILLER, Bruce Marten 35 L 

% Ward, 1608 Upshur, N. W., Washington. D. C. 
MILLER, James Quinter 67 Bn 

10 Manor Drive, Tuckahoe 7, N. Y. 
MILLER, Stephen Raben 13 L 

1501 Undercliff Avenue, Bronx 53, N. Y. 
MILLER, William Henry 21 Bs 

7703 Crossland Road, Pikesville 8, Md. 
MOHN, William Harbester 23 L 

Valmont Farms, Robesonia, Pa. 
MOLZAHN, Klaus George Day 

16 McPherson Street, Philadelphia 19. Pa. 
MONTGOMERY, Andrew Thompson 63 Bn 

4447 Hawthorne Street, N. W., \Vashington 16. D. C. 
MONTGOMERY, DeWitt Hall. Jr ' 2 L 

1617 S. Pasfield, .Springfield, 111. 
MOORE, Warren, Jr ' 106 M.A. 

Bon Air, Va. 

19 



Name Home Address College Address 
MORRELL, Roger Merritt 4 M 

405 Vernon Road, Jenkintown, Pa. 
MORRIS, Albert Gregory 6 F 

249 Woodbine Street, Brooklyn 21, N. Y. 
MORRIS, Joseph Paul, Jr Day 

604 Georges Lane, Ardinorc, Pa. 
MORRIS, Robert Lee 71 Bn 

90 Oakvvood Avenue, Long Branch, N. J. 
MOSER, Kenneth Miles .' 6 M 

2923 N. Charles Street, Baltimore IS, Md. 
MURPHEY, Robert Wilson Day 

Tunbridge Road and College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
MYERS, Gerald Eugene Day 

7 Charles Street, Meshanticut Park, R. I. 

Local Address: 2936 Rising Sun Road, Ardmorc, Pa. % Mr. John Mercer 

Telephone: Ardmore 1438-W 
MYERS, Richard Norman Day 

118 Coulter Avenue, Ardmore, Pa. 

N 

NAMY, Claude Albert 4 G.H. 

97 Brd. de la Resistance, Casablanca, Morocco 
NASH, Henry Thomas Day 

116 Rockland Road, Merion, Pa. 
NEUHAUS, Roland Charles Day 

66 W. Eagle Road, Havertown, Pa. 
NEWLIN, William Harbold Day 

6 Buck Lane, Haverford, Pa. % Mrs. A. G. Dean 

NEWMAN, Paul Freedman 64 Bn 

7 Balfour Circle, Lansdow ne. Pa. 

NICKLIN, George Leslie, Jr 24 F 

Alden Park Manor, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 
NOFER, George Hancock, 2nd 15 Bs 

632 W. Elkins Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

O 

OBERHOLTZER, Wendell Woodward Day 

Mont Clare, Montgomery Co., Pa. 
OLIVIER, Daniel Dretzka G.H. 

1303 John Street, Baltimore, Md. 
OLMSTED, Peter Scott 29 Be 

Moylan, Rose Valley, Pa. 
OPPENHEIM, Daniel Payne 31 Be 

3029 "O" Street, N. W., Washington 7, D. C. 
OPPENHEIMER, Martin Julius 31 Be 

3506 Bancroft Road, Baltimore 15. Md. 
OSWALD, David Statton 27 L 

826 The Terrace, Hagerstow u, Md. 
OUELLETTE, Armand Roland 8 M 

29 Elmhurst Avenue, Highland Park, Mich, 

P 

PACKARD, Merlin Wadsworth 66 Bn 

Monmouth, Me. 
PANCOAST, Charles Edward, III Day 

Cushman Road, Rosemont, Pa. 

20 



Name Home Address College Address 

PARKE, Robert Gerber 1 5 L 

The Riverside, Cambridge Springs, Pa. 
PARKER, John Hunter 5-7 16 

Columbia Pike, R. 2, Ellicott City, Md. 
PARKES, Robert Irving, Jr 12-521 

87 Ivy Way, Port Washington, N. Y. 
PARRAN, Richard Bentley 17 M 

3734 Oliver Street, N. W., Washington 15, D. C. 
PATTERSON, Edward Bell, Jr 6 Bs 

34 Lenape Road, Colwick, Merchantville P. O., N. J. 
PEASE, Alfred Morgan, Jr 3 Bs 

207 Bloomfield Avenue, W. Hartford, Conn. 
PEASE, William 10 M 

207 Bloomfield Avenue, W. Hartford, Conn. 
PEIFER, William Snare 14 Bs 

309 Santa Rita Apts., Atlantic City, N. J. 
PENNYPACKER, Edward Lane Dav 

203 Kings Highway, West, Haddonfield, N. J. 
PETERS, David Alexander " 23 L 

45 N. 11th Street, Allentown, Pa. 
PHILLIPS, David Evan 15 Bs 

500 Lee Avenue, Webster Groves, Mo. 
PIERSON, John William, Jr Day 

1107 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Local Address: 1906 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 3, Pa. 
PIERSON, Philip Milroy 17 V 

4452 Beacon Street, 2nd Apt., Chicago, 111. 
PINCH, William, Jr 29 L 

Hawthorne Farm, Libertyville, 111. 
POST, Arnold Rae Day 

9 College Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
POWER, Richard Wilson 28 L 

25 Pine Street, Canton, N. Y. 
PRICE, Robert Nelson 29 L 

4918 Hillbrook Lane, Washington 16, D. C. 
PRINS, Geert Caleb Ernst 107 M.A. 

630 Fifth Avenue, Room 1002, New York 20, N. Y. 
PROSSER, Robert Arthur 18 Bs 

2047 Green Street, Philadelphia 30, Pa. 

R 

RADBILL, Hugh Russell L.H. 

Moylan, Pa. 
RANKLIN, Richard Entwisle 24 L 

715 E. 20th Street, Chester, Pa. 
RAWNSLEY, Howard Melody 13 M 

416 Park Street, Ridley Park, Pa. 
REEDER, Rudolph Rex, Jr 8 Bs 

2616 N. Lake Drive, Milwaukee II, Wis. 
REITZEL, Nicolas Martin 41 Be 

512 Harvard Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 
RENINGER, Charles William 6 M 

128 S. St. Cloud Street, Allentown, Pa. 
REYNOLDS, Edward Allan IF 

111 Spring Avenue, Chestertown, Md. 
REYNOLDS, James Conrad 16 L 

208 W. State Street, Kennett Square, Pa. 
RHOADS, William Lester, III , Day 

206 Harding Avenue, Havertown, Pa. 
RHUE, Frederick Folsom Be TM'. 

2547 N. Summit Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 

21 



Name Home Adtlrpss College Address 

RICHIE, Dou(;la.s Hooten 11 F 

8 N. Main Street, Brewster, N. V. 
RICHIE, ROBI RT HOOTKN, JR 21 Bs 

"Round Top." West Chester, Pii. 
RICKERMAN, Hi nrv Georgk Day 

731 Panmiire Road, Haverford, Pa. 
RICKS, Richard Arnold, III 7 1) F 

1506 Westwood Avenue, Rirhniond, Va. 
RIDE, Dale Burdell 10 Bs 

840 22nd Street, Santa Monica, Calif. 
RIDINGTON, Thoalxs MacKay MM 

349 E. Main Street, Lansdale, Pa. 
RITCHIE, George Blake 2 Bs 

25 Gore Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
ROBBINS, Leon Cleveland, Jr 4-746 

Elmer, N. J. 
ROBERTSON, Robert Bruce Roche 41 Be 

1334 Terry Avenue, Seattle 1. Wash. 
ROBERTSON, Walter Gordon 5 M 

Box 164, R. 1, Port Blakely, Wash, 
ROBINSON, Derrick Patrick Moore 9 Bs 

62 Moreland Avenue, Trenton, N. ], 
ROBINSON, Richard Edward 12-521 

Earlhani College, Riclnnond, Ind. 
RODEW^ALD, William Young 8 M 

508 Edgerton Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ROGOFF, Richard Caeser 6 L 

25 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, \. Y. 
ROSE, Charles Oscar 10 L 

Rose Manor, East State Street, Doylcstown, Pa. 
ROSENTHAL, David Richard 20 L 

609 Reservoir Street, Baltimore 17, Md. 
ROWE, David Knox S Bs 

5209 N. Sydenham Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
ROYER, Richard Bradley Day 

310 Brentford Road, Haverford. Pa. 

Telephone: Ardraore 4466 
RUDISILL, RuFiJs Clare, HI 4 M 

352 Kenmore Avenue. Glenside, Pa. 
RITE, George Elson, Jr 36 L 

234 W. Johnson Street, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 
RUSSELL, Robert Masters Day 

Oak wood, Wenonah, N. J. 

Loail Address: 605 Railroad .Avcmie. Haverford, Pa. % Mr. Frank lUford 

S 
ST. CLAIR, Albert Thurston, Jr 13 F 

2301 W. 11th Street, Wilmington, Del. 
SANGREE, Carl Michael, Jr.. . 1^ 7-746 

% Drake, 702 Pennstone Road, Brvn Mawr, Pa. 
S.\NGREE, Charles Si'ahr ' 26 L 

103 Madison Street, Wellsville, N. Y. 
SATTERTHWAIT, Arnold Chase Dav 

35 N. 6th Street, Reading. Pa. 

Local Address: 757 College .\vemic. Haverford. Pa. % Mrs. W. H. Collins 
SCHLEGEL, Richard Arthur 2 L 

434 Sunset Road. West Reading, Pa. 
SCHMIDT, Carl Frederic, Jr.. . . '. Day 

517 Old Gulph Road, Penn \'ailev. Xarhcrth, Pa. 
SCHMIDT. Harry Haddon, Jr Day 

1229 Wyngate Road, ^Vvnne^\()od, Pa. 

22 



Name Home Aridrpss College Address 

SCHNAARS, jAMKs Albert Day 

Bettws-Y-Coed. Apt. 7, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

SCHNEIDER, Stewart Porterfield 14 M 

14 Hathawav Lane, Verona, N. J. 

SCHUMAN, Richard Waldron 31 L 

2210 Forrest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

SCHWARTZ, William 33 L 

2921 E. Newport Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 

SCOTT, George Hubert Day 

Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

SEDER, Eugene Isaac Day 

5260 Center Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Looil Address: 605 Railroad Avenue, Haverfnrd. l>a. % Mr. Franl< l^fford 

SEGAL, Arthur Gilbert Day 

7801 Bayard Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SEGAL, Marvin Day 

729 Snyder Avenue, Philadelphia 18, Pa. 

SEIFERT, Aurel Martin 1 1 M 

162 Kimball Terrace, Yonkers, N. V. 

SELINGER, Maurice Arthur, Jr Be T.W. 

1868 Columbia Road, Washington, D. C. 

SELLERS, Alexander Deacon 8 F 

6600 McCallum Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SENER, Joseph Ward, Jr 8 Bs 

108 W. University Parkway, Baltimore, Md. 

SHAKESPEARE, Edward Oram Day 

482 Sabine Avenue, Wynnewood, Pa. 

SHEARER, Charles Robert Day 

7528 Rogers Ave., Highland Park, Del. Co., Pa. 

SHEPARD, Royal Francis, Jr 16 L 

128 N. Mountain Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

SHEPPARD, Charles Richard 8-746 

120 W. Cypress Street. Kennett Square, Pa. 

SHIELDS, Charles Agard 12 Bs 

Agard Farm, Torrington. Conn. 

SHIEN, Gi-Ming Day 

Chungking, China 

Local Address: Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 

SHOFFSTALL, Donald Hugh 18 L 

76 Chestnut Street, Maplewood, N. J. 

SINGER, Ellis Paul 38 L 

139 Tuscan Road, Maplewood, N. J. 

SMILEY, Francis Gerow, Jr 108 M.A. 

Lake Mohonk, N. Y. 

SMITH, Allen John 8 M 

141 E. Market Street, York, Pa. 

SMITH, Drayton Mellor 7a F 

Germantown Manor 804, Hortter and Greene Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SMITH, Merle Burleigh 4 L 

Box 74, Bolton Landing, N. Y. 

SMITH, Paul Reynolds Day 

509 Brookview Lane, Havertown, Pa. 

SMITH, Robert Wadsworth 14 Bs 

49 Prospect Hill Avenue, Summit, N. J. 

SMYTH, Francis Scott. Jr 1 30 Be 

916 Jackling Drive, Burlingame, Calif. 

SNADER, Edward Roland, III 55 Bn 

547 Sussex Road, Wvnnewood, Pa. 

SNIFFEN, Allan Mead. 7 Bs 

25 S. Madison Avenue, Spring Valley, N. Y. 

23 



Name Home Address College Address 
SNIPES, Eur.AR Thomas 24 B? 

Lincoln Highway, Morrisville, Pa. 
SPARKS, Donald Irving Day 

1216 Garfield Avenue, Havertown, Pa. 
SPATZ, Richard Edwin 3 L 

West View, Pittsburgh 2, Pa. 
SPROULE, Joseph 68 Bn 

College Avenue and Darby Road, Haverford, Pa. 
STACKHOUSE, Robert Clinton 25 Be 

57 N. Main Street, Medford, N. J. 
STANMYER, Joseph LeRov, Jr 16 M 

702 E. Willow Grove Avenue. Pliiladelphia. Pa. 
STARKWEATHER, Howard Warner. Jr 35 L 

815 Augusta Road, Wilmington 67, Del. 
STEERE, Paul Winsor L.H. 

409 E. Ridge Street, Marquette, Mich. 
STERN. Harris Irving 16 M 

1213 Stratford Avenue. Melrose Park, Philadelphia 26, Pa. 
STETTENHEIM, Peter Rich 16 Bs 

901 Lexington Avenue, New York 21. N. Y. 
STEVENS, Thomas McConnell Dav 

405 State Road, Bala-Cynwyd. Pa. 
STEWART, David William, II Day 

117 St. Paul's Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
STONE. John Alexander Dav 

349 W. 85th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Local Address: 773 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. % Dr. Frank Watson 
STOTT, Paul Richard 39 Be 

905 S. Main Street, Newark, N. Y. 
STREETER, Edward, Jr 20 Bs 

447 E. 57th Street, New York City, N. Y. 
STROHL, Harold Frederick Day 

24 E. Clearfield Road, Havertown, Pa. 
STUART, Spencer Raymond 7 L 

10943 Longwood Drive, Chicago 43, 111. 
SUTOR, James Frederick Day 

6710 Anderson Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
SUYDAM, William Edward .". Day 

Pennokla Farm, Malvern, Pa. 
SWARTLEY, Ray Moyer 36 Be 

Woodland Drive, Lansdale, Pa. 
S\VARTLEY, William Moyer 36 L 

Woodland Drive, Lansdale, Pa. 

T 

TAGGART, George W^ebster 19 L 

1245 E. Broad Street, Hazleton, Pa. 
TANAKA, Augustus Masashi 104 M..A. 

.591 S. E. Second Street. Ontario, Ore. 
TATN ALL, Runcie Lea, Jr Day 

26 Hilltop Road, Philadelphia 18. Pa. 
TAYLOR, Richard Clark 12 M 

713 Cameron Street, Alexandria, Va. 
TEST, Edward Webster 17 F 

Whitemarsh Road, Philadelphia 18, Pa. 
THAWLEY, Stanley Brevoort 28 L 

245 N. Somerset Avenue. Crisfield, Md. 
THOMAS, John Paca Dav 

212 W. Highland Avenue, Chestnut Hill. Pa. 
THOMAS, Sergei Cleaver 29 Be 

149 Lincoln Avenue, Newark 4, N. J. 

24 



Xame Home Address College Address 

THORPE. James Hancock 38 L 

2822-21 1th Street, Bayside, X. V. 
TILLEY, David Campbell 15 Bs 

7 Plaza Street. Brooklyn 17, X. Y. 
TODD, Thomas Abbot . .' 4 F 

Serpentine Lane, ^V^ncote, Pa. 
TODD, ^VILLIAM Ewell! Jr 22 Bs 

3609 Warren Road, Cleveland, Ohio 
TOLAX, David John 62 Bn 

2951 X. Marietta Avenue, Milwaukee 11. Wis. 
TRAVERS, John Edwin 3-746 

715 Dela^\are Avenue, Buffalo 9. X. Y. 
TURXER, Conrad ^VILLIAM L.H. 

307 Hamilton Road. Wynnewood. Pa. 
TL TTLE, Edwin Ellsworth 34 1 

76 Hillcrest Avenue, Summit, X. J. 
TYCHAXTCH, John Dimitri 12 L 

53 Balmforth Avenue, Danbury, Conn. 

V 

VAIL, Philip Cresson 30 F 

502 W. Front Street, Media, Pa. 
\'ALEXT1XE. Richard Silsbee Day 

130 X. Allegheny Avenue. Bellefonte, Pa. 

Local Address: 111 Mon Dela Avenue, Bryn Maur, Pa. 

% Mrs. Herman C. Giersch 
\'AX ARKEL. Bernard Dav 

960 Glenbrook Road. Brvn Mawr, Pa. 
\'AX HOLLEX, Christopher 8 L 

Bellona Avenue and Cedarcrutt Road. Baltimore, Md. 
VELTE, Robert Hullev 42 Be 

226 Huntlev Road, Upper Darbv, Pa. 
VIXSIXGER. Henry Edwin, Jr Day 

78 ^V. Park Place, Xewark, Delaware 

Local Address: 773 College Avenue. Ha\erford. Pa. % Dr. Frank ^Vatson 
VITELLO. John Arthur 14 Bs 

761 W. Main Street. Rochester 11, X". Y. 
\OGEL, William Whitten Day 

218 Avon Road, Xarberth, Pa. 

W 

WAGXER, Daniel Hobson 39 Be 

10 Conestoga Road, Berwyn. Pa. 
WALKER. L\n Gordon 51 Bn 

Frog Hollow Road, Rydal, Pa. 
WALKER, Richard Alan' 21 Be 

Xewton, R. D. 2, Bucks Countv. Pa. 
\VALXUT, Francis Kane 16 F 

1 Lehman Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 
\VARXER. ^VILLIAM Hamer 16 Bs 

1344 Denniston Street, Pittsburgh 17. Pa. 
\VARXKEX, Henry Frederick 7bF 

81 Chestnut Street, Oneonta. X. Y. 
^^^\TKIXS, Richard W.\lker 105 M.A. 

1120 X. Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WHEELER, Edw.\rd Stlbbs 34 L 

Greencastle, R. D. 3, Pa. 
WHITALL, Richard Be T.W. 

211 E. 49th Street, Xe\v York City 17, X. Y. 
^VHITALL, ^Valter Brlnton 59 Bn 

5363 Magnolia Avenue, Philadelphia 44, Pa. 

25 



Name Home Address College Address 
WHITBY, William Melcher Day 

127 E. Upsal Street, Philadelphia 19, Pa. 
WHITCOMB, Harold Clark, Jr 22 L 

337 N. 25th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
WHITE, Robert Blackistone Day 

655 Fern Street, Yeadon, Pa. 
WHITE, Robert Phillips Day 

464 Turner Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
WHITMAN, John Turner 20 L 

Nashawtuc Hill, Concord, Mass. 
WICKHAM, Robert Saunderson, II Day 

Devon, Pa. 
WIDMER, Robert James Day 

% R. S. Straw l)ridge, Box 66, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
WIGFIELD, Harvey 18 L 

170 Dickson Avenue, Patterson, N. J. 
WIGHTMAN. Arthur Harvey 7 Bs 

1025 Grand Avenue, Keokuk, loua 
WILCOX, John Rogers 16 L 

127 South West Street, Allentown, Pa. 
WILLIAMS, Robert Deland Day 

710 Pennstone Road, Brvn Mawr, Pa. 
WILSON, David Ryder. . . . '. 1 10-112 M.A. 

Shilmark, Mass. 
WILSON, Ernest Staton, Jr 59 Bn 

Walnut Lane and Ridge Road, Wilmington 278. Del. 
WINDER, David Allen . . .' 30 F 

7200 Hazel Avenue, Upper Darby, Pa. 
WINGERD, Robert Aitken 32 L 

Edgar Avenue and Riddle Road, Chambersbuig, Pa. 
WIRES, John Stanley 10-521 

45 Windsor Road, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

WOOD, Harry Dunseth 25 L 

1321 E. 56th Street, Chicago 37, 111. 
WOOD, Horatio C, 4th 16 Bs 

Box 248, Arden Road, Radnor, Pa. 
WOOD, James 59 Bn 

"Braewold," Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 
WORMAN, William Geor<.e Day 

1033 Rawson Place, Fremont, Ohio 

Local Address: 605 Railroad Avenue, Haverlord, Pa. % Mr. Frank Ufford 
WRIGHT, Daniel Ranney 101 M.A. 

3310 W. 131st Street, Cleveland 11, Ohio 
WRIGHT, James Boyer 38 Be 

7008 Wayne Avenue, Upper Darl)y, Pa. 
WRIGHT, Theodore Craig 22 F 

107 Lee Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 

Y 

YOUNG, Calvin Lessey 5 L 

3743 Nortonia Road, Baltimore, Md. 
YOUNG, Llewellyn Powers 9 L 

Southern Pines, N. C. 

Z 

ZIMMERMAN, Thomas Carskadon 32 L 

719 Winsons Way, Baltimore, Md. 
ZWEIFLER, Nathan Joseph 22 L 

46 Wilbur Avenue, Newark 8, N. J. 



26 



Tress of 



iNNEs & Sons 

Philadelphia. Pa. 
U. S. A. 



Issued October, ^ovemoer, December and 
Feoruary oy Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 



Entered as second-class matter November 2, 1944 at the Post 
Office of Haverford, Pa., under tke act of August 24, 1917. 



HAVERroRD College 
Bulletin 




REPORTS OF 

ACTING PRESIDENT 

AND 

PRESIDENT 

I945-I946 



VOLUME XLV NUMBER TWO 



l^J^ovember 1946 



Issued OctoDcr, November, DecemKer ana 
FeKruary Ky Haverforo College, Haverforo, Pa. 



Entered as second-class matter November 2, 1944 at the Post 
OUice of Haverford, Pa., under tke act of August 24, 1912. 



Haverford College 
Bulletin 




REPORTS OF 

ACTING PRESIDENT 

AND 

PRESIDENT 

1945-1946 



VOLUME XLV 



NUMBER TWO 



N 



ovemoer 



ber 1946 



REPORT OF THE ACTING PRESIDENT 
AND THE PRESIDENT 

Presented at the 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation 

of Haverford College 

October 15, 1946 



THE College year 1945-46 was a year of transition. As the first post' 
war year, it saw the end of war'time acceleration and the end of a 
sparse and unbalanced enrollment. The student body expanded 
rapidly to reach this autumn its largest size in the history of Haverford. New 
and heavy demands were placed upon the faculty and upon the physical 
plant. Plans were laid for far-reaching improvement in the basic college 
curriculum. 

During all but the past forty-five days of that difficult period the College 
administration was in the hands of Archibald Macintosh as Acting President. 
To him, your new president expresses warm appreciation for the balanced 
and judicious guidance which he has given Haverford aff"airs. His quiet 
service in the interest of the College has held the Faculty together, and has 
maintained the high standards of admissions and of academic performance 
which have marked Haverford over the years. 

With him, your president regards the present state of the College as 
suited to offering its students a sound liberal arts training. We feel that the 
College is solving wisely the problem most urgently confronting American 
educators today. That is the problem of how best to help the immense 
number of students who are asking for a college education and who cannot 
be cared for in the normal college and university facilities. To meet that 
demand, emergency facilities are being created throughout the United States. 
In many places this means barracks as dormitories, temporary campuses lack- 
ing in library and laboratory facilities, inexperienced instructors, and classes 
numbered in the hundreds. At Haverford we have admitted and made 
space for the largest student body ever handled in the College. All students 
who had been absent in humanitarian or military service have been re- 

one] 



admitted. At the same time we have refused to allow any important deteriora- 
tion in teaching methods or in the social and spiritual life of the College. 
Classes continue to be small. Experienced and competent men serve as 
instructors. Although the dormitories are crowded, there is a healthy, 
vigorous student life. This solution, in which solid teaching can be afforded 
to a modestly increased number of men, is, we believe, more in the public 
interest than offering superficial and disorganized instruction to a greatly 
increased number. It is a costly solution but abundantly warranted. 

At a later date we shall report upon other policies which we feel to be 
essential to the full, fruitful service of the College. This report is concerned 
with the progress during the past year, and while it comes from us jointly, it 
is primarily a record of the administration of Acting President Macintosh. 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

The increase in the size of the student body, predicted last October, began 
to take place in January when 108 men were admitted. From the middle of 
the year on, the Admissions Office was deluged with applications. There was 
no relief from this situation until College opened on September 18th with a 
student body of 492 as compared with 172 at the same time last year. 

The application list for 1947 has already assumed formidable proportions. 
There have been many inquiries as to the possibility of February admissions. 
Though a number of men now in College will finish at that time, their places 
will be filled by former students whose discharges will come through in the 
fall, and to whom we are committed. The present enrollment mak^s the 
admission of anything resembling a new class impossible even if, from the 
point of view of poHcy, we thought it advisable. 

A comparison of our present enrollment figures with 1944 and 1945 is: 

Fall Semester 1944 12^ 

Fall Semester 1945 



280 
Admitted at Mid- Year 1946 



172') 
lOBJ 



Fall Semester 1946 492 

The student body this year represents 27 states, as compared with 21 a 
year ago. In addition, the following are represented: Belgium, Canada, 
China, Costa Rica, England, France, Jamaica, Mexico, Morocco and 
Norway. 

Undergraduates who are members of the Society of Friends number 70, 
or 14.3 per cent of the total. 

There follows a comparative table of registration by departments, the 
sharp increase in EngUsh, Philosophy and Sociology being worthy of note. 

[two 



Department 






R 


egistrations 








1946 


1945 


1944 


1943 


1942 


1941 


1940 


Art 


6 








1 


3 


14 


19 


Astronomy 


12 


1 





1 


15 


22 


43 


Bibhcal Literature . 


33 


1 


12 


3 


12 


18 


27 


Biology 


93 


61 


32 


46 


66 


81 


92 


Chemistry 


193 


79 


54 


78 


228 


224 


180 


Economics 


115 


30 


22 


27 


124 


147 


155 


Engineering 


43 


17 


15 


25 


95 


74 


62 


English . . . UCi.'V . 




151 


101 


77 


195 


224 


187 


French 


107 


43 


26 


25 


36 


64 


93 


German 


140 


56 


59 


52 


117 


100 


111 


Government . . . . 


148 


31 


36 


34 


94 


100 


121 


Greek 


30 


2 


7 


6 


24 


18 


12 


History 


208 


94 


60 


45 


98 


143 


156 


Italian 


5 











4 


1 


8 


Latin 


12 


8 


4 


5 


30 


24 


29 


Mathematics . . . . 


198 


68 


50 


59 


162 


158 


121 


Music 


25 


7 


14 


5 


31 


18 


23 


Philosophy 

Psychology 


181 
97 


SI 


37 


35 


86 


99 


95 


Physics 


73 


34 


35 


58 


120 


77 


83 


Russian 


8 




















Sociology 


153 


42 


14 


28 


43 


72 


82 


Spanish 


84 


22 


20 


21 


65 


48 


12 


Humanistics 


4 


6 













Haverford Students at Bryn Mawr 

Art 6 

English 6 

Math 1 

Psychology 2 

History 1 

Degrees, June 8. 1 946 

B.A 19 

B. S 4 

M. A 8 

Hon. Degrees 2 

FINANCIAL OUTLOOK 
In October, 1945, the prospects of an increased enrollment gave some 
promise of brightening what had seemed to be a gloomy picture as we con- 

three] 



sidered the budget. Even so, it looked as if we might be faced with a deficit 
of approximately $75,000. 

The Treasurer's Report for the year shows that we came closer to escaping 
a deficit than anyone would have had the temerity to predict. The Treasurer, 
the Finance Committee, and the Comptroller are all to be congratulated upon 
this welcome outcome. 

Among the factors which account for this excellent showing is the Alumni 
Fund. Once more the Alumni contributed generously to the college, and 
though the total amount was less than in the preceding year, the addition of 
360 new names to the list, making a total of over a thousand contributors, is 
worthy of special note. The Alumni should know that their help is deeply 
appreciated and has been of immense value at a critical period for the 
College. 

The financial prospect for the year just begun is brighter than was the 
outlook in either the fall of 1944 or 1945. One word of warning is important 
at this time. It is erroneous to assume that a student body of maximum size 
is pe s€ a guarantee of relief from budgetary worries. Increased costs of 
instruction, and additional equipment, can easily and usually do offset what 
might at first glance be considered surplus. So long as our endowment 
remains unchanged, every additional student reduces the funds per student 
available for instruction. 

THE PLANT 

Constant operation during the war prevented as much work on the plant 
in the way of replacements and repairs as would have been desirable and in 
accord with what should be normal practice. The Barclay fire introduced 
a complication which was far from welcome. 

Despite our being understaffed in the Maintenance Department, a lot was 
accomplished toward bringing the plant back into good condition. New 
boilers and a shift to oil in the power house was one important undertaking. 
Exterior painting on a number of the buildings was completed. College Lane 
and the road east of Sharpless Hall were top-dressed; gutters on Lloyd, the 
Union, and Roberts were rebuilt. 

We were fortunate in Mr. Lamb's being able to complete the restoration 
work on Barclay soon after the opening of College. The new quarters on 
the fourth floor are spacious and attractive, and what is more important, the 
previous narrow stairways have been eliminated. The rebuilding program 
included the re-wiring of Barclay, an operation which was long overdue. 
Work is well under way on the Observatory, and we hope that it will be 
possible to put that building back into first-class shape soon. The formulation 
and ratification of a policy for the maintenance of faculty houses represents 
[four 



a major advance. A program of extraordinary repairs is under way and with 
the appointment of a new Superintendent this should eventually mean much 
in the preservation of our plant and in the efficiency of our operation. 

THE FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 

With the appointment of a new President, it has been possible to work out 
a distribution of the administrative load in a manner which gives some guar' 
antee of satisfactory operation. General administration, admissions, the 
Deanship and the O&ce of Comptroller are all adequately manned, a most 
fortunate circumstance at a time when the enrollment is at its maximum. 

Dr. Frank W. Fetter, Chairman of the Economics Department, has re- 
turned from a leave of absence in Washington. Dr. A. J. Williamson in 
the French Department has returned from the Navy. 

The appointments for the new year include Dr. Bjarne Braatoy, and Mr. 
E. Grant Meade in Government; Dr. Daniel Coogan in German; Dr. Ira 
Reid in Sociology on a part-time appointment; Evan Davis as a part-time 
instructor in German; Michael Cooper as a part-time instructor in Russian; 
and Dr. P. C. Duisberg in Chemistry, as a substitute for Dr. T. O. Jones, 
whose health will not permit him to return to the Faculty this year. Dr. J. 
Duncan Spaeth is again with us as visiting professor in English. Dr. Wilbur 
Ufford is beginning his work in the Department of Engineering. 

Mr. Seaton Schroeder has been appointed Supenntendent of Buildings 
and Grounds. 

THE COLLEGE PROGRAM 

Soon after the presentation of last year's report, a new Postwar Planning 
Committee was appointed with Dr. Oakley as chairman. We felt that this 
committee should consider a number of the matters suggested by the previous 
committee, and, at the same time, develop its own program. 

Dr. Oakley's committee embarked on an intensive study of the College 
program, caUing upon the Faculty singly and in groups for advice, sugges- 
tions and criticism. The broad outHnes of a plan were drawn, and acted on 
favorably by the Faculty in the spring. 

There remain many details to be discussed; certain areas of the Colleges' 
operation yet remain to be considered and this committee has again resumed 
work with the purpose of filling out the rough sketch already drawn, and 
above all of considering how the new plan shall be put into practice. 

It has seemed appropriate to change the name of the committee from that 
of Postwar Planning to the Committee on the College Program. The plan 
Itself is of such a nature that rather than try to present an outline of it here, 
we prefer to wait until it can be put into a report which will do it full 
justice. 

five} 



CONCLUSION 

During the war years everybody looked ahead to the time when the Col' 
lege would again be full and functioning in a normal manner. The College is 
full now, and one cannot walk about the campus without realizing that 
activity and accomplishment are in the air. The period through which we 
have just passed has brought about changes, many of them beneficial. 

As we move through this period of transition, one cannot feel anything but 
stimulated and hopeful at the way that the students, the faculty and the 
administration are attacking their problems. The College is at the point of 
realizing some of its hitherto undeveloped potentialities. It is not getting back 
to what it was before the war, but rather going forward to something better 
and something more significant. The measure of the College's opportunity 
will, we hope, be some measure of its accomplishment. 

Archibald Macintosh 
Gilbert F. White 




REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN FOR 1945-46 

During the first semester the Library continued to operate under most of 
its wartime restrictions, but in the second semester the steady increase in 
student enrollment and the return of various members of the faculty brought 
a considerable renewal of activity in all departments. This put a heavy strain 
on our reduced staff. Because of the national shortage of trained librarians, 
this strain will be difficult to relieve for some time to come. 

It is important that everyone in the College should understand the 
nature of the work done by the Library StaflF. This work falls into two 
distinct divisions : 

(1) MAINTENANCE, i. e. the orderly control of our complete collection 
of books, both on and off the shelves. Every one of our 180,000 or more 
books* has a place where it belongs. Our readers select the books they want 
and remove them from their places, scattering them over the building or 
taking them out for home use. Professors assemble and re'assemble them in 
special groups for classes. Amid all this flux and turmoil, the librarians of 
the Circulation Department keep track of the wanderers as well as the 
volumes on the shelves, and can tell you exactly where any book is at any 
time. They also instruct and supervise the many student assistants, who, un- 
der the present system of enforced labor for scholarship holders, are an 

*This figure includes about 12,000 Government Documents on deposit. 
(six 



unwieldy and relatively inefficient crew. Year by year our book collections 
grow larger, and the task of maintenance becomes correspondingly greater 
and more complex. It is now physically impossible for one librarian to 
handle the Circulation Department. Next year we shall have to have two; 
and unless some method is devised for reducing the size of our Library, the 
time will come when three will be needed — and so on. 

(2) GROWTH. Each year we add a certain number of books to our 
collections: those received by gift almost equal the number acquired by 
purchase. The steps in the handling and processing of the annual increment 
are as follows : 

(a) The entire Faculty is constantly engaged in the selection of titles 
to be purchased from the annual income of our endowed funds; and, to 
a lesser degree, in sifting donations, retaining what is of primary value 
and reserving the rest for exchange or for re-donation. Thxis the entire 
Faculty is actively associated with the Library Staff — a fruitful and 
useful relationship. 

(b) The Department of Accessions and Accounting takes the titles 
recommended by the professors, checks them, orders them from the 
proper pubHsher or dealer at home or abroad, enters the charges in the 
various accounts in which they belong (there are over a hundred 
accounts which must be kept balanced, so that any professor can be 
told at any time how much has been spent, how much is outstanding, 
and how much remains in any category), receives the new books when 
they arrive, enters them serially in our accession list, stamps them, plates 
them, and cuts the pages (if they need it) . At the end of each month the 
bills are checked and allocated to the various funds and transmitted to 
the Comptroller for payment. 

(c) The books are now ready to be incorporated in our collection. I 
have said that every one of our 180,000 books has its place. About 3,000 
more must be assigned to their places each year. That is the job of the 
Cataloguing Department, and it is a job which calls for scholarly train- 
ing. To do it perfectly, a Faculty would be required; in fact, our 
Faculty does frequently help with the difficult linguistic and scientific 
problems. Each book must be classified, i. e. it must be put exactly 
where it belongs in the Library of Congress scheme of classification (so 
complicated is modern knowledge that the published key to this classifi' 
cation is a three-foot shelf of books). Thus the book is assigned to its 
particular place or niche on our five or six miles of shelving. But before 
the books go to the shelves, they must be tagged and finger-printed (so to 
speak) and their records must be filed. Several sets of printed catalog' 
cards for each book must be ordered from the Library of Congress; and 

seven] 



when the Library of Congress cannot supply them (which is the case 
with almost half of our scholarly books), we must make our own cards. 
These sets are checked and prepared for author-entry, title-entry, and 
subject-entries in our Card Catalog; and must then be filed with the 
utmost care (for a card out of place is as useless as a lost book — or more 
so, for when a book is lost, the card tells you!). Cards must also be set 
aside for the Philadelphia Union Catalog. Then the book itself must be 
prepared for shelving. For some, this means that they must be bound — 
and so important is the annual assembling and checking of periodicals 
for the bindery that this work constitutes a "department" of the Library. 
Finally, every bound volume, before it goes to the shelf, must have its 
call-number neatly lettered on its spine and the letters must be protected 
with shellac. 

(d) Other Departments, which in a larger library would require the 
full time of one or more librarians, are the Government Document 
Department, which classifies and shelves vast numbers of uncatalogued 
pamphlets, and the Inter-Library Loan Department, which does an 
ever-increasing and time-consuming "mail-order" business. 
Of the special problems of the Rare Book Department I have said nothing : 

they are adequately set forth in the separate Report of the Curator of the 

Quakeriana Collection. 

So long as we add approximately 3,000 volumes per year to our collection, 

the duties of the Accessions and Cataloguing Departments will remain 

static, except insofar as they feel the effect of a steady increase in complexity. 

But cooperation of the sort that is contemplated between the Libraries of 
Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, and Haverford will immediately increase our 
routine tasks to the extent of requiring an additional trained librarian on our 
Staff. In the Circulation Department additional help will be needed to keep 
track of Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore books at Haverford and Haverford 
books at Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore. But even more time-consuming will 
be the need of getting books from our shelves for absent readers. The Haver- 
ford Library operates on the open-shelf or "cafeteria" principle : the readers 
help themselves. But if the readers are in absentia someone must fetch their 
books and write their charge-slips for them. Similarly, the work of the 
Cataloguing Department will be slowed up and complicated by the doubling 
of the Card Catalog in size — a dubious blessing for readers and librarians 
alike, and involving a considerable expense not only for installation but for 
maintenance as well. Cooperation between the three libraries may be a great 
help to scholarship, but its cost, direct and indirect, will be heavy. 

Discussion of cooperation, which was furthered during the year by the 
excellent "Findings of the Committee [of Survey]" and by the joint meeting 

[eight 



of the three Library Committees, has so far dealt only with theory. Practical 
problems of cost must now be squarely faced. 

GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS 

The total number of recorded volumes in the Library at the end of August, 
1946, was 169,184. During the past year, 2,764 volumes were added; 1,365 
by purchase, 1,190 by gift or exchange, and 209 sent by the United States 
Government for our Government Depository Collection. In addition, a far 
greater number of publications (both books and pamphlets), which were 
received from the Government, were filed without being catalogued. 84 
books were discarded. 

GIFTS 

The number of books actually donated to the Library was far in excess 
of those ''added to the Library by gift" — for many of them had to be placed 
in our Duplicate Collection. The following donations deserve special 
mention : 

From Horace R. Hayday, 288 books on the European War, 

1914-18. 
From Craig Snader, 235 books on Economics. 
From the Estate of J. Howard Redfield, 197 books on Linguistics. 
From Frances B. G. Branson, 162 books, about half of them 

Quaker. 

From John L. Scull, 1 1 5 books of general literature. 
From William W. Comfort, 229 pamphlets on Romance 
Languages. 

From Mrs. C. K. Jones, 65 books, mostly Spanish. 
From Margaret H. Johnson, 51 volumes of early American pub- 
lications. 

From Lyle Settle, 46 books, mostly on Music. 

From Henry Freund, 39 textbooks. 

From A. S. FitzGerald, 39 ''books of the month." 

From Frederick V. Hetzel, 28 books of general literature. 

From Florence Beddall, 17 volumes of Lytton's works. 

From Roberto Payro, 12 books, mostly on South America. 

From Rufus M. Jones, 14 books, some of which were his own 

writings and others were for his Collection on Mysticism. 
From Sumner B. Coggeshall, 10 books. 
From Ellen Winsor, a set of the Freeman (8 volumes). 
From Mrs. Henry S. Drinker, 10 books. 
From William Reitzel, 12 books. 

nine] 



CIRCULATION 

The total circulation of Library books was 16,633. Of this number 2,425 
were loaned to the Faculty, 10,387 to students, and 3,821 to borrowers not 
connected with the College. With the increased enrollment of the second 
semester, the student circulation increased sharply, showing a 73 percent rise 
over that of the past year. The 1,200 books reserved by students in carrels 
during the year are also an indication of the greater use the students are 
making of the Library. 

INTER-LIBRARY LOANS 
During the past year 308 volumes were sent to other libraries and 115 
borrowed by us. The latter figure is much smaller than it would be, if we 
counted the number of books borrowed by professors and students from 
libraries in the vicinity. 

COOPERATION WITH OTHER LIBRARIES 
Over 2,500 cards were sent to the Union Library Catalog in Philadelphia, 
listing new entries in our Catalog. New periodical and serial entries were 
sent to the H. W. Wilson Co. for inclusion in forthcoming Serial Catalogs. 
A donation of duplicate magazines was made to the Friends Service Com- 
mittee; and books were donated, along with those contributed by the 
Faculty, to the University of Caen. 

Dean P. Lockwood. 

Librarian. 




REPORT OF THE CURATOR OF THE 

QUAKER COLLECTION 

for 1945-46 

The most important thing to record concerning the Quaker Collection in 
1945-46 is that it was used and visited more than ever before. Particularly 
notable was the increase in the number of students coming into the Treasure 
Room for Quaker Books, a direct result of the increased interest in the 
Society of Friends aroused by Howard H. Brinton's course in the history 
and philosophy of Quakerism, and of the encouragement which the English 
Department gave to freshmen who wished to write essays on Quaker sub- 
jects. Advanced scholars in Quaker history and Quaker thought also visited 
the Library to the number of thirteen, coming from as far away as California 

[ten 



and Massachusetts. Commencement this year was a veritable field day for 
the Treasure Room, so large was the number of alumni and friends who 
dropped in. The assignment of scholarship students to keep the Treasure 
Room open on Saturday and Sunday afternoons has been a great help in 
our service to visitors as well as students. 

In the field of Quaker books we have added 420 volumes to our shelves, 
of which 252 were gifts, and 168 were purchased. The largest gifts of books 
came from Hannah G. Dewees and Frances B. G. Branson. We felt im' 
pelled to transfer one volume from Mrs. Branson's gift to the Treasure 
Room at Westtown, namely, a copy of A Plan for a School (Philadelphia, 
1790), the first printed proposal for a Friends boarding school in Pennsyl' 
vania, annotated by Owen Biddle, author of the pamphlet and one of the 
founders of Westtown School. Among the purchases were two groups of 
interesting material, a number of pamphlets published by French Friends 
during the war, unobtainable until peace came, and photostatic copies of 
several early Quaker items of great rarity in the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, including pamphlets by Daniel Leeds, Francis Daniel Pastorius, 
Thomas Budd, and Jonathan Dickenson. These were purchased in accor- 
dance with our policy of trying to obtain photostatic or microfilm copies of 
rare Quaker material, of which the acquisition of originals, except by gift, 
would be impossible. 

The importance of microfilm as an aid to libraries and scholarship was 
emphasized by an exhibition of Haverford's collection of books and manu' 
scripts in microfilm, set up to celebrate the delivery of the long'awaited 
Recordak Library Film Reader, which arrived as a daybefore-Christmas 
present. This machine, for the purchase of which funds were left by the 
late Arthur H. Thomas in 1941, now makes possible the easy use of material 
in microfilm by professors, visiting scholars, and students. It is a most impor' 
tant addition to Haverford's facilities for research. 

Quaker manuscripts, pictures, and maps to the number of 268 have been 
added to the collection this year, largely by loan or gift. These include the 
record books and papers, here on loan, of the Female Society of Philadelphia 
for the Relief and Employment of the Poor, a Quaker group which is the 
oldest philanthropic organization in Philadelphia. A very extensive collection 
of papers relating to the business activities of the Cope family, Philadelphia 
Quaker ship-owners of the early nineteenth century, has also been placed in 
the care of the Quaker Collection, pending their sorting and analysis. Among 
the gifts were papers of President Isaac Sharpless, from his daughter, Helen 
Sharpless; an album of portraits of American Friends, from Horace Mather 
Lippincott; an interesting collection of Whittier letters and family papers 
from Mrs. Egbert S. Gary, Sr. ; and the typewritten biography and addresses 

eleven] 



of Allen David Hole (1866- 1940), edited by his son, Francis D. Hole. 
Charles Francis Jenkins contributed a document on the Virginia Exiles to 
Haverford's collection on the subject. 

Additions to the Charles Roberts Autograph Collection, numbering 147, 
reflected the spirit of the times, for eightysix of these were autographs of 
Army generals in the Pentagon Building at Washington, collected by Major- 
General Charles P. Gross, who is the father of two Haverfordians, and 
transmitted to the College by Professor Frank W. Fetter. Unique in interest 
were two very different documents, an autograph letter of Edmund Halley, 
discoverer of the comet, written on St. Helena in 1677, the gift of Chris- 
topher Morley; and the typewritten manuscript of Albert Jay Nock's The 
Memoirs of a Superfluous Man (1943), the gift of Ellen Winsor and 
Rebecca Evans. Professor L. A. Post gave the College an interesting group 
of letters from Takeo Arishima (1878-1923), a Japanese liberal who took his 
Master's degree here in 1904. 

For the meetings of the Haverford Library Associates, held in the 
Treasure Room, one on biography and one on Quaker fiction, there were 
special exhibitions of maunscripts and books of great variety in these two 
fields. We also played host to school. Boy Scout, and professional library 
groups during the course of the year. 

Cooperation with the Friends Historical Library at Swarthmore has 
grown to the point where two joint staff meetings were held, one at Haver' 
ford and one at Swarthmore. We have also exchanged dupHcate books with 
Swarthmore, as we are doing with the Friends Library in London. From 
our Quaker duplicates we were also able to supply sixty-two volumes to the 
Sophia Smith Collection on women's work and writings at the Smith College 
Library. 

The ending of the war brought the opportunity to finish some of our 
war-time projects— we added 200 items to our collection of Civilian Public 
Service Camp papers — and to rebuild our connections with Europe. 

C. Marshall Taylor, one of the Honorary Curators of Friends Historical 
Library at Swarthmore, generously offered to procure English Quaker 
material for Haverford as well as for Swarthmore on a recent journey to 
England. This is a happy augury of increasingly close cooperation on the 
part of Friends here and abroad who are concerned with the gathering, 
preserving and use of books relating to the Society of Friends. 

Thomas E. Drake, 

Curator. 



[twelve 




REPORT OF THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The report of house patients is as follows: 

1945-1946 1944-1945 

Patients admitted 63 25 

Total time (days) 419 124 

Diseases are classified as follows: 

Grippe and respiratory 41 

Intestinal 6 

Joint conditions 3 

Miscellaneous 13 

Total number of visits of dispensary patients : 

1945-1946 1944-1945 

Medical 1,340 1,490 

Surgical 748 723 

Total 2,088 2,213 

Conditions are classified as follows: 

Upper respiratory 383 

Fractures 1 

Sutures 5 

General 499 




PUBLICATIONS AND ACTIVITIES OF 
THE FACULTY 

1945-46 

ALLENDOERFER, CARL B. 

"Slope in Solid Analytic Geometry". American Mathematical Monthly, 53:241-7. 
No. 5, May 1946. 

Twenty-four short reviews of mathematical articles in Mathematical Review's, Vols. 
6 and 7. 

Associate Editor: American Mathematical Monthly. 

Member of Board of Directors: Main Line Cooperative Association. 

Member of Rhodes Scholarship Selection Committee for Pennsylvania. 

Toastmaster: Annual Dinner, American Mathematics Society, Ithaca, N. Y., 
Aug. 22, 1946. 

thirteen} 



ASENSIO, MANUEL J. 
Lecture: "The Roots of the Spanish Civil War", Amherst, Mass. 

BENHAM, THOMAS A. 
"Research Aids for the BHnd". Published in the magazine, Elcctronicj. 

Member of the committee of "They Need You" 

Member of the Committee of The Philadelphia Branch of the Pennsylvania Asso- 
ciation for the Bhnd. 

Research and development for Warren Webster Co., Camden, N. J. 

Development project during the summer of 1946 for the physics department of 
Penn State College. 

CADBURY, WILLIAM E., Jr. 

"The Cultural Values of the Sciences in the Premedical Program" (with W. B. 
Meldrum). Journal of Chemical Education. 23:338-40, No. 7. July 1946. 

Review of: Physical Chemistry for Premedical Students^ by John Page Amsden. 
McGraw-Hill Book Co., Journal of Chemical Education. 23, 362-363 (1946). 

Committee on Student Chemists, a committee of the Philadelphia Section of the 
American Chemical Society. 

Clerk and Overseer: Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

Member: Committee in Charge of Westtown School of Philadelphia Yearly 
Meeting. 

Member: Democratic Committee, 4th ward, Haverford Township. 

Candidate (unsuccessful) for the School Board of Haverford Township, on the 
Democratic ticket, Nov. 1945. 

COMFORT, HOWARD 
"Our War With Russia", The Friend. 120:52-56, No. 4, Aug. 1946. 
Secretary-Treasurer: American Philological Association. 
Educational Committee, American Friends Service Committee. 
Community Fund of Philadelphia Family Budget Committee. 
Delaware County Welfare Council. 
Friends Council on Education. 
Director: Osborne Association. 

Secretary: Advisory Council of School of Classical Studies, American Academy in 
Rome. 

COMFORT, WILLIAM W. (President, Emeritus) 
"A Quaker Lobbyist Reports on Washington in 1812" (with T. E. Drake). 
Bulletin of Friends Historical Association, 34:77-88. No. 2. 1945. 

"William Penn's Religious Background". Tributes to William Penn. pp. 55-72. 
Published in Harrisburg, 1946. 

President: Friends Historical Association. 

President: Bible Association of Friends in America. 

President: Sleighton Farm School for Girls. 

President Emeritus: Delaware County Tuberculosis Society. 

Member of Council: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

Member of Overseers of William Penn Charter School. 

[fourteen 



DRAKE, THOMAS E. 

Articles on "Joseph John Gurney", "William Penn", "Society of Friends", "John 
Woolman" in An Encyclopedia of Religion, Virgilius Perm, editor, pp 317, 571, 721- 
22, 829. Published by The Philosophical Library, N. Y., 1945. 

Review of H. S. Nedry, "The Friends Come to Oregon". The United States 1865- 
1900. 3:122-23, published by The Hayes Foundation, Fremont, Ohio, 1945. 

"Draft Problems Remain", The Meeting, No. 90, November, 1945, published by 
Haverford Friends Meeting, Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

"A Quaker Lobbyist Reports on Washington in 1812" (with W. W. Comfort). 
Bulletin of Friends Historical Association. 34:77-88, No. 2, 1945. 

Editor: Bulletin of Friends Historical Association, vol. 34, No. 2, 1945; vol. 3 5, 
No. 1, 1946. 

Lecture: "Quaker Education in Theory and Practice", annual meeting of the Nan- 
tucket Coffin School Association, Nantucket, Mass., Aug. 22, 1946. 

Chairman of Publications Committee: Friends Council on Education. 

Editor and Member of Board of Directors: Friends Historical Association. 

Member of Board of Directors: Pendle Hill. 

Member of Board of Directors: The Friend 

Member of Committee on Research: Society for American Studies of the Middle 
Atlantic States. 

Chairman of Draft Problems Committee: Haverford Monthly Meeting of Friends. 

DUNN, EMMETT R. 

"The Amphibions and Reptiles of the Colombian Caribbean Islands San Andres 
and Providencia." Caldasia, pp. 363-5, No. 14, September, 1945. 

"Atractus sanctaemartae, a New Species of Snake from the Sierra Nevada de 
Sante Marte Colombia". Occasional Papers Museum of Zoology, University of 
Michigan, pp. 1-6, No. 493, April, 1946. 

"Thomas Barbour", 1884-1946". Copeia. pp. 1-3, No. 1, April, 1946. 

"A New Snake From the Eastern Andes of Colombia", Caldasia, No. 17, August, 
1946. 

Lecture: "Problems of Isthmian Distribution," Pittsburgh, April, 1946. 

Curator of Reptiles and Amphibions: Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. 

Board of Governors: American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. 

Board of Directors; Society for the Study of Evolution. 

Guest for Research: American Museum of Natural History, July-August, 1946. 

EVANS, F. C. 

Lecture: "Population Growth" — Bryn Mawr Journal Club (Biology), January, 
1946. 

Lecture: "Rodent Ecology" — School of Public Health Men at Johns Hopkins, 
March, 1946. 

FETTER, FRANK W. 

"Economics: South America (Except Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela)" Hand- 
boo\ of Latin American Studies 1941, pp. 145-63, Harvard University Press, Cam- 
bridge, 1942. 

fifteen] 



"The Need for Postwar Foreign Lending" American Economic Review. 33:J42'46 
No. 1 (Supplement), March, 1943. 

"Anglo-American Cooperation for Expansion of World Trade" State Department 
Bulletin, 12:501-3, No. 300, March 25, 1945. Published also in World Economics. 
3:62-7, No. 9-10, March-June, 1945. 

Review: "Two Manuscripts," by Charles Davenant. The Journal oj Economic 
History, pp. 237-8, November, 1944. 

Lectures: "Anglo-American Cooperation for Expansion of World Trade" — 
American Marketing Association in Philadelphia. March 20, 1945; "The Future 
of Multilateral Trade" — University of Chicago. April 15, 1946; "Rebuilding Multi- 
lateral Trade"^ — Alumni Conference of the School of Business Administration, 
University of Michigan. May 11, 1946. 

Executive Committee of the American Economic Association, 1944-47. 

Committee on Social Science Personnel of Social Science Research Council, 1945-46. 

Chief Mission Officer with Office of Lend-Lesae Admint'stration and Foreign Eco' 
nomic Administration, January, 1943 to July, 1944. 

Chief of the Division of Lend Lease and Surplus War Property Affairs, Depart' 
ment of State, 1944-46. 

Chief of Division of Investment and Economic Development, Department of State, 
1944-46. 

FLIGHT, JOHN W. 

Abstracts of articles on archaeological subjects in foreign periodicals for American 
Journal of Archaeology. 

Editor of Proceedings of Society of Biblical Literature, Journal of Biblical Litera' 
ture 65:1-44, March, 1946. 

Lectures: "Prophets of Israel" — Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, California, 
September to November, 1945. 

Secretary: The (National) Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis. 

Member of Program and Nominating Committees: The (National) Society of 
Biblical Literature and Exegesis. 

Associate Editor: Journal of Bible and Religion (Organ of the National Associa- 
tion of Biblical Instructors). 

Member and Acting Secretary: Conference of Secretaries of the American Council 
of Learned Societies Meeting, January, 1946. 

FOSS, MARTIN 

The Idea of Perfection in the Western World, Princeton University Press. 
Princeton, New Jersey, 1946, 102 pages. 

Lectures: Fullerton Club, Bryn Mawr; Baptist Church, Lailsdowne. 

GREEN, LOUIS C. 

Lectures: "Atomic Energy in Stars and Bombs" — Rittenhouse Astronomical Society, 
October, 1945; "The Release of Atomic Energy" — Phoenixville Rotary, November, 
1945; "The Release of Atomic Energy" — Science Club of the Philadelphia College 
of Pharmacy, December, 1945. 

{sixteen 



"Oscillator Strengths for the Continua of Ca II," read at meeting of the American 
Astronomical Society at Madison, September, 1946. 
President: Rittenhouse Astronomical Society, 1946. 
Research Worker: Mt. Wilson Observatory, Summer, 1946. 

HERNDON, JOHN G. 

Philadelphia: Cradle of Liberty. Co-author with Owen J. Roberts, L. Stauffer 
Oliver, and R. L. Johnson. Privately printed, Philadelphia, 194?, 32 pages. 

Record of the Trip of the Philadelphia Delegation to the Meetings of the Prepara- 
tory Commission of the United T^ations in London. Co-author with L. StufFer Oliver. 
Copy presented to Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 194?, 92 typewritten pages. 

"The Federal Income Tax Applicable to Individuals Under Revenue Act of 1945," 
Winston Business Administration. 2:255-444, John C. Winston Company, Phila- 
delphia, 1946. 

"Revolutionary Soldiers' Pensions of Orange County, North Carolina," Daughters 
of the American Revolution Magazine, 80:427-9, No. 8, August, 1946. 

Lectures: "The Proposed Loan to Britain" — The Foreign Policy Association of 
Philadelphia; "London in Wartime" — Association of University Women and other 
groups; "The College of Arms" — Annual Meeting Address before the Genealogical 
Society of Pennsylvania; "Descents from Magna Carta: A Study in Constitutional 
Law" — Annual Meeting of Magna Carta Barons. 

Member: Radio WCAU Round Table on "International Cooperation." 

Director: United Nations Council of Philadelphia. 

Member: Philadelphia Delegation to London to bid for the location of the United 
Nations" world peace capital. 

HETZEL, THEODORE B. 

Lecture: "Youth Service Projects of the American Friends Service Committee" — 
Rotary Club, Bridgeton, N. J., November 15, 1945. 

Chairman Philadelphia Section: Society of Automotive Engineers. 

Chairman Work-Camp Committee: American Friends Service Committee. 

Chairman Hobby Committee: Westtown Alumni Association. 

Member of Board and Chairman of Community Advisory Committee: Haverford 
Community Cent-er. 

Member of Executive Committee: Campus Club of Haverford College. 

Member of Nominating Committee: Haverford Monthly Meeting of Friends. 

HOLMES. CLAYTON W. 

Consulting Engineer: Firm of Wroe Alderson, Simon and Sessions, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

JONES, RUFUS M. 

Introduction and Chapter 1 in Together, Abington-Cokesbury, New York, 1945. 
pp. 7-23. 

La Fe y la experiencia de los Cuaqueros. Spanish translation of Faith and Practice 
of the ^ua\ers. Casa Unida, Mexico, 1946, 185 pp. 

"Selected Stories of Maine Humor," Clark University, Worcester, Mass., 1945, 
23 pp. 

seventeen] 



JONES, THOMAS O. 

Lectures: "Control of Atomic Energy: A Quaker's View," General Assembly. 
Oshkosh Teachers College, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, October 16, 1943; Kiwanis Club, 
Oshkosh, Wisconsin, October 17, 1945; State Conference Congregational Church, 
Madison, Wisconsin, November 18, 1945; Trinity Episcopal Church, Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin, November 25, 1945; Congregational Church, Dundee, Illinois, January 
6, 1946; Broadcast A. B. C, January 27, 1946; Chicago Junior Chamber of Com' 
merce, March 14, 1946; Milwaukee Conference of Church Women, March 8, 1946; 
State Meeting Kiwanis International, April 25, 1946. 

KELLY, J. A. 

Review: "Christian Heinrich Schmid and His Translations of English Dramas, 
1767-1789," by L. M. Price. The Germanic Review 21:73-4, No. 1, New York, 
February, 1946. 

Review: "Germany's Stepchildren," by Solomon Liptzin. The Germanic Review 
21:153-55 No. 2, New York, April, 1946. 

Member: American Council on College Study in Switzerland (since December, 
1945). 

Department Editor in German Literature: The Jsfatjonal Encyclopedia (since Sep- 
tember, 1946) Crowell-Collier Publishing Company, New York. 

MELDRUM, WILLIAM B. 

Laboratory Manual of Organic Chemistry (Second Revision), College Offset Press, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 23 pages. 

"The Cultural Values of the Sciences in the Premedical Program" (with W. E. 
Cadbury) Journal of Chemical Education, 23:338-40, No. 7, July, 1946. 

Review: "Introductory College Chemistry," by Holmes, Chemical Industries, June, 
1946. 

Lecture: "The Mechanism of Oxidation-Reduction Reactions" — Eighth Summer 
Conference of the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, Middlebury, Vt. 

Director of symposium on "Electrochemistry" at the Eighth Summer Conference 
of the New England Association of Chemistry Teachers, Middlebury, Vt., August, 
1946. 

Associate Editor: Journal of the Fran\lin Institute. 

Chairman, Activities Committee: American Chemical Society. 

Councilor: American Chemical Society. 

OAKLEY, CLETUS O. 

Lecture: "Teacher Training and Selection," Association of Private School Teachers 
at New York and Vicinity. October 26, 1945. 

Editorial work in connection with Army Specialized Training Program testing and 
the API. 

PALMER, FREDERIC, JR. 

Editor and author of reports on interior ballistics. Division 1, National Defense 
Research Committee. 

Chairman, Franklin Medal Committee: Franklin Institute. 

[eighteen 



PEPINSKY, ABRAHAM 

"Musicology, the Stepchild of the Sciences," The Journal of Accoustical Society 
of America. 17:83-6, No. 1, July, 1945. 

Lecture: "The Psychology of Rhythm" — Music Teachers National Convention, 
Detroit, Michigan. February 23, 1946. 

POST, L. ARNOLD 

Editor: Loeb Classical Library. 

Coach: Haverford production of The Arbitration by Menander as translated and 
completed by Gilbert Murray. Performed November 30, 1945, and December 1, 
1945, at Haverford College and December 1, 194 5, at Swarthmore under the auspices 
of the Cap and Bells Club. 

President: American Philological Association, 194 5-6. 

SARGENT, RALPH M. 

Revie.w: "Bright Day," by J. B. Priestly, in Books of the Week, Philadelphia 
Record, October 4, 1946. 

Member Executive Committee: College Conference on English, Middle Atlantic 
States. 

President: Highlands Museum and Biological Laboratory, Highlands, North Caro- 
lina. (The biological station of the University of North Carolina, Duke University, 
Vanderbilt University, and Wesleyan College.) 

President, Library Associates, Haverford College. 

SNYDER, EDWARD D. 
Lecture: "Edgar A. Poe" — Bowdoin College, August 13, 1946. 

SPAETH, J. DUNCAN 

"Wilson As I Knew Him and View Him "J^ow," Woodrow Wilson, Some Prince 
ton Memories, Edited by William Starr Myers, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 
New Jersey, 1946. pp. 69-91. 

"The Education of Abraham Lincoln" The Philadelphia Forum, November, 1945. 
pp. 6'23 (5 pages). 

"Epic Conventions in Paradise Lost," University of Colorado Studies, Series B 
(Studies in the Humanities) 2:201-7, No. 4. October, 1945. 

"Et Ego in Arcadia" (Reminiscences of Dr. Faires' Classical Institute). PhiJd' 
deiphia Forum, January, 1946. pp. 10-22 (3 pages). 

Lectures: "Lincoln at Gettysburg" — Gettysburg College; "Literature and Theology" 
— Gettysburg Seminary; "Law for Man and Law for Thing"^ — Franklin Institute; 
"Shakespeare Today" — Radnor High School, April 23, Birthday Address; "Seaman- 
ship and Orsmanship in the Odyssey and Beowulf" — Princeton. ^ 

STEERE, DOUGLAS V. 

Soil of Peace, A Human Events Essay Pamphlet. Human Events, Chicago, 1946. 
"Be Renewed in the Spirit of Your Minds," 1946 Quaker Lecture, Western 
Yearly Meetings. Indianapolis, 1946. 16 pages. 

nineteen] 



Introductory Essay to Kierkegaard's WorJ^s of Love. Princeton University Press, 
Princeton, New Jersey, 1946. 

"Kveekarien Jumalpalvelus" — An address on Quaker worship published in Finnish. 
Helsinki, 1946, 7 pages. 

Review: "Theresa of Avila," Mother of Carmel, by Allison Peers. Christendom. 
11:530-32, No. 4. Autumn, 1946. 

Review: "Gospel According to Grmaliel," Fellowship. 12:30, No. 2. February, 
1946. 

Review: "In Downcast Germany," by Joan M. Fry. Bulletin of Friends Historical 
Association. 34:94. Autumn, 1945. 

College Preaching in: Smith College, Mt. Holyoke College, Cornell University, 
Connecticut College for Women, Howard University, University of Washington, 
University of Wisconsin (Convocation Address), Beloit College, Jewish Theological 
Seminary (NYC), New England Student Christian Movement, Union Theological 
Seminary, University of Michigan, Drew Theological Seminary. 

Presidential Address: American Theological Society. 

President 1945-6: American Theological Society. 

Editorial Committee for Translation of Christian Classics into Chinese charged 
with preparation of mystical and devotional literature. 

Clerk: Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Ministers and Elders — 1945-6. 

American Friends Service Committee: Finnish Mission June to October, 1945. 

American Friends Service Committee: Service on Board and Committees. 

Service on Board and Committees: Pendle Hill. 

Vice-President: Fellowship of Reconciliation, 1945-6. 

Assistance to Finnish-American Committees in fund-raising, including speaking 
in twelve cities. 

SUTTON. RICHARD M. 

"Does Science Mean Peace?" Christian Century reprinted in "Essays for Our 
Times," 42:1002-5, No. 36, September, 1945. 

"Trailblazers and Surveyors," The Friend, 119: No. 7, September, 1945. 

"Transmuting Atoms and Men," Christian Century, 43:914-16, No. 30, July, 1946. 

"Atomic Bombs and Balms," Proceedings of J^iew Torl^ Railroad Club, 56:1-23, 
Nov. 15, 1945. 

"The Growth of the Concept of Mass-Energy Equivalence," American Journal of 
Physics. 14:137, No. 2, March-April, 1946. 

Review: "Atomic Energy for Military Purposes," by H. D. Smythe. Reviewed 
for Review of Scientific Instruments. 17:133, No. 4. April, 1946. 

Lectures: "Atomic -Energy" — Sydenham Medical Coterie, Philadelphia, October 
9, 1945; "Atomic Energy" — Public Forum, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, October 22, 
1945; "Atomic Energy" — Collection, Haverford College, October 30, 1945; "The 
Growth of the Concept of Mass-Energy Equivalence" — American Association of 
Physics Teachers, New York, January 25, 1946; "From Stars to Atoms and Home 
the Same Night" — American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York. February 
25, 1946; "Atomic Energy" — Haverford Alumni Club, Baltimore, Md., March 2, 
1946; "Liquid Energy" — William Penn Charter School, March 11, 1946; "Atomic 

[twenty 



Energy" — Public Forum on Foreign Policy, Chester, Pa., March 19, 1946; "Atomic 

Energy" Methodist Good Fellowship Club, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 

8, 1946; "Atomic Energy" — Philadelphia Committee on Public Affairs, April 24, 
1946; "From Shallow to Deep Water in Physics," — Society for Promotion of Engin- 
eering Education, St. Louis, Mo., June 21, 1946. 

Editorial work on Physics articles for Encyclopedia Britannica "Junior." 

Examiner in Physics: Swarthmore College, February. 

Examiner in Physics: College Entrance Examination Board. 

Committee on Science and the Arts: Franklin Institute. 

Committee on Museum: Franklin Institute. 

Executive Committee: Westtown General Committee. Philadelphia Yearly Meet' 
ing. 

Committee on Religious Life of Society: Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. 

Committee on Haverford Friends School: Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

Chairman: Religious Education Committee. Haverford Monthly Meeting. 

SWAN, ALFRED J. 

Review : "The Diaries of Tchaikovsky," translated with notes by Wlaldimir Lakend. 
Music Siuarterly, 32:308-10, No. 2. 

Composition: "Canzona and Fugue," for piano 

Composition: "Christmas Game" for orchestra and reduction for piano for four 
hands. 

Composition: "Sine Nomine" for piano. 

Composition: "L'Anneau de Turquoise" for piano. 

Composition: Two poems from Robert Louis Stevenson's "Songs of Travel": "I 
Shall Make You Brooches" for one voice and piano, "I Know Not How It Is With 
You" for one voice and piano. 

Composition: "Chorale for Palm Sunday." 

Composition: "Praeludium et Fuga" for piano. 

Composition: "Fragment" for piano. 

All compositions reproduced by Independent Music Publishers, New York. 

TEAF, HOWARD M., JR. 

Public Member: Regional War Labor Board (and its successor. War Stabilization 
Board) until June, 1946. 

Member: Work Camp Committee and Industrial Relations Committee, American 
Friends' Service Committee. 

Associate Professor of Economics: Cornell University, Summer session, 1946. 

WATSON, FRANK D. 

Review: "Field Work in College Education," by Helen Merrell Lynd, The Annals 
of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 246:165-6, July, 1946. 

Industrial Disputes Division of the Third Regional Office of the T^ational War 
Labor Board until December 31, 1945. 

Candidate: for membership in the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. 

Member: Inter-cultural Committee of the United Nations Council of Philadelphia. 

twenty-one} 



WYLIE. LAURENCE W. 

Lectures: "Poetry at the Sorbonne," 183 3' 1868" — Modern Language Association; 
"A Program for French in College" — Modern Language Teachers, Phila. Chapter, 
November, 1945. 

Member: Polish Sub'Committee. American Friends Service Committee. 
Member: Work Camp Committee. American Friends Service Committee. 
Member: Advisory Committee on Student Activities. American Friends Service 
Committee. 

Vice-President: Association of French Teachers, Philadelphia Chapter, 1946. 
Contest Committee: Pennsylvania Association of Teachers of French. 



[twenty-two 



COLLECE OJfCSET PRESS. 148-150 H. 6TH ST . PMILA 6. PA. 



Haverford College 
Bulletin 




1946-1947 



CATALOG ISSUE 



VOLUME XLV 



NUMBER THREE 



DECEMBER, 1946 



Issueo October, IS^ovemoer, December and 
Xeoruary by Haverforo College, Haverloro, Pa. 

£ntcreo as second-class matter ^oveinl>er 2, 1 944 at tne Post 
Office at Haverford, Pa., under tte act of August 24, 1 91 2 



>~yyyyyyyhyyy>-y>-yyyyyyyyyyyyy'^x-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<^-<-<-<-<^-< 



Haverford College 



Bulletin 



yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy 




-R -<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-< 



1946-1947 



HAVERFORD, PENNSYLVANIA 



yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy*:*^-^-^^^~(^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



CONTENTS 

College Calendar, 1946-47 4 

Haverford College — History and Description 7 

Corporation 10 

Board of Managers 11 

Faculty 13 

Officers of Administration 18 

Standing Committees of the Faculty and Administration 19 

Regulations 

Admission 20 

College Entrance Board 21 

Advanced Standing 23 

Curriculum 24 

Acceleration 24 

Required Courses 25 

Limited Electives 25 

Major Concentration 27 

Free Electives 28 

Freshman Program 29 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Programs 29 

Conflicting Courses 29 

Additional Courses 30 

Special Cases 30 

Intercollegiate Courtesy 30 

Preparation for Professions 30 

Grading of Students 34 

Delinquent Students 34 

Degrees 36 

Honors 38 

Financial Arrangements 40 

Rooms, Board, and Tuition 40 

College Responsibility 41 

Monthly Payments 41 

Loan Fund 41 

Placement Bureau 42 

2 



Student Activities 43 

Student Government 43 

Societies and Organizations 44 

Student Publications 45 

Courses of Instruction 46 

General Information 

Library 77 

Art Collection 78 

Lectures 78 

Bucky Foundation 79 

Infirmary 79 

Health Program 79 

Campus Club 80 

Official Publications 80 

Scholarships and Fellowships 80 

Prizes 84 

Degrees, Prizes, and Honors Granted in 1945-46 89 

Alumni Associations 93 

Index 95 



1946 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


September 


1 


? 


1 


4 


s 


6 


7 


November 












1 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




?Q 


BO 














?4 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


October 






1 
8 


2 

9 


3 
lO 


4 
11 


5 
12 


December 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
lO 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


6 


7 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




27 


28 


29 


30 


31 








29 


30 


31 












1047 






s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


January 








1 


? 


3 


4 


April 






1 


? 


1 


4 


5 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 




6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 


11 


12 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


February 


26 


27 


28 


29 


SO 


31 


1 


May 


27 


28 


29 


30 








t 


2 


3 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


lO 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


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17 




16 


17 


18 


19 


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21 


22 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


March 














1 
8 


June 


1 
8 


2 

9 


3 

10 


4 

11 


5 

12 


6 

13 


7 
14 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




16 


17 


18 


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20 


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22 


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24 


2S 


26 


27 


28 




23 
30 


24 

31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




29 


30 





































College Days in heavy-faced type. 



CALENDAR 
1946-1947 

Registration of all new students Sept. 16-17 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 9 a.m.; registra- 
tion of returning students Sept. 18 

First-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m Sept. 19 

Thanksgiving Recess (dates inclusive) Nov. 28-Dec. 1 

First Quarter ends Nov. 27 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Dec. 9 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive) Dec. 22, 1946-Jan. 5, 1947 

First-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduating 

Seniors Jan. 1 1 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations Jan. 15-18 

First-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors in 

Major Subjects) Jan. 16 

Mid-year Examinations Jan. 20-31 

Second Semester begins with Registration of all new stu- 
dents, 9 A.M.; approved Second-Semester Programs of 

returning students must be filed by 5 p.m Feb. 3 

Second-Semester Classes begin, 8 a.m.; Assembly, for all stu- 
dents, 1 1 A.M Feb. 4 

Third Quarter ends Mar, 29 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 30-Apr. 6 

Last date for selection of Major Departments by students 

who have been in attendance three terms Apr. 29 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts Apr. 29 

Second-Semester Classes in Major Subjects end for graduat- 
ing Seniors May 17 

Senior Comprehensive Examinations May 21-24 

Second-Semester Classes end (except for graduating Seniors 

in Major Subjects) May 22 

Final Examinations May 26-June 6 

Commencement Day June 7 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE was foundcd in 1833. It owes its origin 
to the vision and energy of a few members of the Society of 
Friends who, in the spring of 1830, conceived the idea of 
founding an institution for education in the higher branches of learn- 
ing. The object, in the words of the founders, was "to combine 
sound and liberal instruction in literature and science with a 
religious care over the morals and manners, thus affording to the 
youth of our Society an opportunity of acquiring an education equal 
in all respects to that which can be obtained at colleges." 

The founders were incorporated in 1833, under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, into the Haverford School Asso- 
ciation, a body now known as the Corporation of Haverford College. 
This corporation elects a Board of Managers for the control of its 
affairs and for the administration of its funds. For the founding 
of the School sixty thousand dollars was raised. Since that time, 
by a number of generous bequests and donations, the amount of 
invested funds yielding income has been increased to over four 
million dollars. 

Haverford Station is on the main line of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, between Bryn Mawr and Ardmore, and is only twenty minutes 
from downtown Philadelphia by excellent suburban service. The 
College campus, adjoining the famous Lancaster Pike (U. S. 30) , is 
two hours' train journey from New York or Baltimore, and under 
three hours from Washington. Valley Forge is one of the many 
national shrines in the immediate vicinity. The cities of Trenton, 
Bethlehem, Allentown, Reading, Lancaster, Chester, and Wilmington 
all lie within a radius of fifty miles. Whether for historic association, 
cultural advantage, or physical accessibility, Haverford College is 
admirably situated. 

The original tract of 198 acres has since been increased to 216 
acres. While a portion is retained as farm and woodland, a lawn of 
sixty acres was long ago graded and tastefully planted with trees and 
shrubs by a landscape gardener so that the natural beauty of the 
location has increased with passing years. The grounds include seven 

7 



8 Haverford College 

fields for football, baseball, cricket, and soccer; a running-track, 
numerous tennis courts, and a pond for skating. 

Parallel with its material growth there have been changes in the 
inner life of the College which have affected the methods of admin- 
istration rather than the essential principles on which the institu- 
tion was founded. It has gradually increased in number of students, 
but with an enrollment limited to 400 still enjoys all the advantages 
of a small college. From the first it gave instruction of collegiate 
scope and grade. Accordingly, in 1856, the name was changed from 
school to college and the right to confer degrees was granted by the 
Legislature. In 1861 the preparatory department was abolished. 

The large endowment enables the College to maintain a faculty 
of unusual size in proportion to the number of students, and to 
expend for the instruction, board, and lodging of each student 
much more than he pays. The advantages of a central location are 
utilized by bringing to college assemblies, on frequent occasions, 
men and women who have established leadership in government, 
business, and the professions. Particularly in the Social Sciences, 
where the seminar method is emphasized, theoretical instruction is 
frequently checked against the practical experience of visitors 
prominent in official, industrial, and professional life. 

Haverford students enjoy unusual liberty, safeguarded by their 
wholesome physical life, by the traditions of the College, and by 
the intimate association with their professors and fellow students. 
All examinations and tests are conducted under an Honor System 
administered by the Students' Association. Under the Honor Sys- 
tem no person, either student or faculty member, acts as official 
proctor during examinations. Responsible student self-government 
is further emphasized in every aspect of campus life. 

The religious tradition bequeathed by the Quaker founders has 
been carefully cherished, and high ideals of life and conduct are 
maintained. Three times a month the College attends Friends 
Meeting in a body. Attendance at Meeting and at Collection is 
required. The aims of Haverford have been gradually developing 
and its function is becoming more and more clear — "to encourage 
the growth, among a limited number of young men, of vigorous 
bodies, scholarly minds, strong characters, and a real religious 
experience." 



History and Description 9 

A degree from Haverford College is, in itself, a certificate that the 
recipient is intellectually, morally, physically, and socially equipped 
to play his part and in time to assume a post of leadership in the 
occupation and community of his choosing. A good proportion of 
Haverford graduates, however, customarily desire to supplement 
this equipment with distinctly professional education. For students 
who plan to take graduate training in medicine, law, engineering, 
and other highly specialized subjects, the College offers combina- 
tions of courses which prepare its students for admission to the 
best professional schools with full standing, and in many cases with 
advanced credit. 

Sample outlines of study at Haverford, preparatory to post- 
graduate specialization in all the major professions, have been 
prepared. Whether or not he intends to proceed to graduate work, 
the student will in all cases plan his course, and select his Major 
subject, in consultation with faculty advisers. 

The first College building was Founders Hall, erected in 1833; 
with additional wings, it is still in active use. The original astro- 
nomical observatory was built in 1852 and in 1933 was replaced by 
the present newly-equipped structure. The new library, constructed 
in 1940-41, has special facilities for research and contains approxi- 
mately 169,000 volumes. 

There are four separate dormitories, as well as modern class- 
rooms, well-equipped laboratories for chemistry, physics, biology, 
and engineering. The gymnasium was built in 1900; Roberts Hall, 
containing the College offices and a large auditorium, in 1903; the 
Haverford Union, used for many college activities, dates from 1910: 
the Infirmary, from 1912. In the summer of 1941 the College 
kitchens were completely modernized, and in the same year a suit- 
able campus dwelling was converted into a Language House with 
resident director. During the summer of 1942 another of the 
campus dwellings was remodeled into a Government House, which 
has rooms for fifteen students and an apartment for its director. 
Science House, opened in 1943, completes the trio of specialized 
student residences, the occupants of which have all the advantages 
of fraternity life without its social discrimination. 



cs9Go 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Officers 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes, President Moorestown, N. J. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. S 

John F. Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox St., Phila. 44 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 

Term Expires 1947 

Stanley R. Yarnaix 5337 Knox St., Phila. 44 

IRVIN C. PoLEY 6012 Chew St., Phila. 38 

Arthur J. Philups 274 S. Felton St., Phila, 39 

Term Expires 1948 

Henry C. Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Phila. 28 

Wilmot R. Jones Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

Richard M. Sutton 785 College Ave., Haverford, Pa. 



Term Expires 1949 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 7, Pa. 

I. Thomas Steere 375 W. Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

Paul W. Brown Downingtown, Pa. 



10 



Board of Managers 

Ex-officio as Officers of Corporation 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes, President Moorestown, N. J. 

J. Henry Scattercood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 3 

John F. Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox St., Phila. 44 

Term Expires 1947 

J. Stogdell Stokes Summerdale, Phila. 24 

M. Albert Linton 4601 Market St., Phila. 39 

Francis R. Taylor 910 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 S. 3rd St., Phila. 6 

Morris E. Leeds 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 44 

Henry C. Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Phila. 28 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 7 

J. Colvin Wright* 1 16 E. Penn St., Bedford, Pa. 

Term Expires 1948 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 6 

William A. Battey Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 7 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Tabor Rd. and E. Adams Ave., Phila. 20 

Alfred Busselle 220 E. 36th St., New York, N. Y. 

Wilmot R. Jones Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Paul V. R. Miller* 1700 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

Charles S. Ristine* Fidelity-Phila. Trust Bldg.. Phila. 9 

Term. Expires 1949 

Frederic H. Stravi^ridge 801 Market St., Phila. 7 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 2 

L. Hollingsworth Wood 133 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Phila. 44 

William W. Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 325 Chestnut St., Phila. 6 

Harold Evans 1000 Provident Trust Bldg., Phila. 3 

W. Nelson West, HI*. 1411 Walnut St., Phila. 2 

Faculty Representatives on Board of Managers 

Term Expires 1947 Term Expires 1948 

Richard M. Sutton Howard M. Teaf, Jr. 

Alternates, 1946-47: Cletus O. Oakley and Ralph M. Sargent 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes W. Nelson West, III 

•Alumni Representative Manager. 

11 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 

OF THE Corporation of Haverford College 

The Chairman of the Board is an ex-officio 

member of all committees. 

Executive Committee 

S. Emlen Stokes, Chairman Charles S. Ristine 

Thomas W. Elkinton J. Henry Scattercood 

Edward W. Evans Frederic C. Sharpless 

John F. Gummere Jonathan M. Steere 

WiLMOT R. Jones J. Stogdell Stokes 

Morris E. Leeds Wm. Nelson West, 3rd 

Committee on Finance and Investments 
Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman William M. Maier 

Morris E. Leeds J. Henry Scattercood 

M. Albert Linton Alexander C. Wood, Jr. 

Committee on College Property and Farm 
Henry C. Evans, Chairman Paul V. R. Miller 

William A. Battey John A. Silver 

Thomas W. Elkinton Frederick H. STRAWfBRiDOB 

Edward W. Woolman 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 
Henry M. Thomas, Jr., Chmn. M. Albert Linton 

William W. Comfort Francis R. Taylor 

Harold Evans Stanley R. Yarnall 

Library Committee 
AlexanderC. Wood, Jr., C/imn. Wilmot R. Jones 

William W. Comfort L. Hollingsworth Wood 

Counsel 
MacCoy, Brittain, Evans and Lewis 
1632 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 3 



12 



I 



FACULTY 

Gilbert Fowler White President 

S.B., S.M., and Ph.D., University of Chicago 



William Wistar Comfort President, Emeritus 

A.B. and LL.D., Haverford College 

A.B., A. M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Litt.D., University of Pennsylvania 

LL.D., University of Maryland and Lake Forest College 

RuFUS Matthew Jones T. Wistar Brown Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus 

A.B., A. M., and LL.D., Haverford College 

A.M. and D.D., Harvard University 

Litt.D., Penn College 

LL.D., Swarthmore College, Earlham College, and Williams College 

D.Theol., University of Marburg 

D.D., Yale University 

D. Lit. Hum., Colgate University 

S.T.D., Colby College and Columbia University 

H.Litt.D., Jewish Institute of Religion 

Lech Wilber Reid Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

S.B., Virginia Military Institute 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University 
S.M., Princeton University 
Ph.D., University of Gottingen 

Albert Harris Wilson Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

S.B. and S.M., Vanderbilt University 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Henry Volkmar Gummere Lecturer in Astronomy, Emeritus 

S.B., A.M., and Sc.D., Haverford College 
A.M., Harvard University 

Frederic Palmer, Jr Professor of Physics, Emeritus 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Leon Hawley RrrrENHOUSE Professor of Engineering, Emeritus 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology 



(The active members of the Faculty are arranged in the order of their 

appointment to their present rank. Two or more appointed in 

the same year are listed in alphabetical order.) 

William Edward Lunt Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professor of 

English Constitutional History (1917) 
A.B. and L.H.D., Bowdoin College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Frank Dekker Watson Professor of Sociology and Social Work (1921) 

S.B. in Economics and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Dean Putnam Lockwood Professor of Latin (1923) 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

IS 



14 Haverford College 

William Buell Meldrum John Farnum Professor of Chemistry (1927) 

B.A. and M.Sc, McGill University 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Levi Arnold Post Professor of Greek (1933) 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College 

A.M., Harvard University 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

Emmett Reid Dunn David Scull Professor of Biology (1934) 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College 
Ph.D., Harvard University 

Edward Douglas Snyder Professor of English (1935) 

A.B., Yale University 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Frank Whitson Fetter Professor of Economics (193G) 

A.B., Swarthmore College 
A.M., Harvard University 
A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

John Alexander Kelly Professor of German (1937) 

A.B., Emory and Henry College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Columbia University 

Douglas Van Steere Professor of Philosophy (1941) 

S.B., Michigan State College 

B.A., Oxford University 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Cletus Odia Oakley Professor of Mathematics (1942) 

B.S., University of Texas 
S.M., Brown University 
Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Richard Manliffe Sutton* Professor of Physics (1942) 

S.B., Haverford College 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

Ralph Millard Sargent Professor of English (1943) 

A.B., Carleton College 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Carl Barnett Allendoerfer Professor of Mathematics (1946) 

S.B., Haverford College 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

Ph.D., Princeton University 

Hovi'ARD Morris Teaf, Jr.* Professor of Economics (1946) 

B.S. in Economics, A.M., and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 



Alfred Julius Sv^^an Associate Professor of Music (1931) 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

John Goodwin Herndon** Associate Professor of Government (1933) 

A.B. and M.A., Washington and Lee University 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

* Absent on leave, second semester, 1946-47. 
** Absent on leave, 194ft-47. 



Faculty 15 



John William Flight Associate Professor of Biblical Literature (1936) 

B.A., Hope College 

M.A., Yale University 

B.D. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Harry William Pfund** Associate Professor of German (1936) 

A.B., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Howard Comfort Associate Professor of Latin and Greek (1938) 

A.B., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

F.A.A.R., American Academy in Home 

Alexander Jardine Williamson Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

(1939) 
A.B., Haverford College 
A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Roy Earl Randall Associate Professor of Physical Education (1941) 

Ph.B., Brown University 

Thomas Edward Drake* Associate Professor of American History (1942) 

A.B., Stanford University 
M.A., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Clayton William Holmes Associate Professor of Engineering (1942) 

B.S. and M.E., University of New Hampshire 
A.M., Haverford College 

Richard Max Bernheimer Associate Professor of History of Art (1943) 

Ph.D., University of Munich 

William Edward Cadbury, Jr Associate Professor of Chemistry (1944) 

S.B. and A.M., Haverford College 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Thomas Oswell Jones** Associate Professor of Chemistry (1944) 

B.E., Oshkosh Teachers College 

Ph.M. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Abraham Pepinsky Associate Professor of Psychology and Music (1945) 

B.A. and M.A., University of Minnesota 
Ph.D., The State University of Iowa 

Charles Wilbur Ufford Associate Professor of Engineering (1945) 

A.B., Haverford College 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Bjarne Braatoy Associate Professor of Government (1946) 

Law Degree, University of Oslo, Norway. 
Ph.D., University of London. 



Howard Knickerbocker Henry Assistant Professor of Botany (1939) 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 

* Absent on leave, second semester, 1946-47. 
** Absent on leave, 1946-47. 



16 Haverford College 

Theodore Brinton Hetzel Assistant Professor of Engineering (1940) 

S.B., Haverford College 

B.S. in M.E., University of Pennsylvania 

M.S. and Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College 

Alfred Wuxiam Haddleton Assistant Professor of Physical Education (1941) 

Louis Craig Green Assistant Professor of Astronomy (1942) 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Laurence William Wylie Assistant Professor of French (1944) 

B.A. and M.A., University of Indiana 
Ph.D., Brown University 

Manuel Jose Asensio Assistant Professor of Spanish (1945) 

B.A., University of Granada 

Pericial de Aduanas, Academia OfiScial de Aduanas, Madrid 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

William Docherty Assistant Professor of Physical Education (1946) 

S.B., Temple University 

Peter Caspar Duisberg Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1946) 

B.S. and M.S., Pennsylvania State College 
Ph.D., University of Arizona 

Francis Cope Evans Assistant Professor of Biology (1946) 

S.B., Haverford College 
D.Phil., Oxford University 

John Ashby Lester, Jr Assistant Professor of English (1946) 

B.S., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

W. Theodore Paullin Acting Assistant Professor of History (1947) 

B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



Martin Foss Visiting Professor of Philosophy and Government 

LL.D., University of Jena 

John Duncan Spaeth Visiting Professor of English Literature 

A.B. and LL.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Ph.D., University of Leipzig 

Litt.D., University of Pittsburgh and Muhlenberg College 

LL.D., University of Oregon 

Ira De Augustine Reid Visiting Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Morehouse College 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

Daniel Francis Coogan, Jr Visiting Assistant Professor of German 

A.B., Haverford College 

M.A., and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

IfERBERT William Taylor Lecturer in Hygiene (1932) 

A.B., Haverford College 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania 



Arlington Evans Instructor in Physical Education (1921) 

B.P.E., Normal College A. G. U. 
M.S., Temple Univeraitjr 



Faculty 17 

John Otto Rantz Instructor in Engineering (1940) 

Graduate of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades 

Thomas Alonzo Benham Instructor in Physics (1942) 

B.S. and M.S., Haverford College 

EusA AsENsio Instructor in Spanish (1943) 

Edward Grant Meade Instructor in Government (1946) 

A.B., Dartmouth College 

M.A., University of Wisconsin 

M.A.L.D., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy 

Michael Savvitch Cooper* Instructor in Russian (1946) 

Cum Maxima Laude, University of Odessa 

Evan Baird Davis Instructor in German 1946) 

A.B., Amherst College 

A.M., University of Pennsylvania 

Richard Hardin Warren Instructor in English (1947) 

A.B., Haverford College 

William V'iacheslav Cherry Instructor in Russian (1947) 

Graduate of Emperor Paul's Military Academy, St. Petersburg 
LL.B., University of Pennsylvania 



Alan Stewart FftzGerald Research Associate in Physics and Engineering 



Norman Barge Bramall Assistant in Physical Education 

Ray Joseph Mullan Assistant in Physical Education 

B.S. and M.A., Temple University 

Lessing Anthony Kahn Assistant in Psychology 

B.A., University of Illinois 
M.A., University of Buffalo 

Robert Lee Bowden Assistant in Chemistry 

Samuel Tucker Fox^ III Assistant in English 

Jesse Gyger Grier Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., Haverford College 

Henry Edwin Vinsincer, Jr Assistant in Chemistry 

James Boyer Wright Assistant in Chemistry' 

A.B., Haverford College 



The Dean and the Comptroller are members of the Faculty. 



' Deceased. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Gilbert Fowler White President 

S.B., S.M., and Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Archibald Macintosh Vice-President 

A.B., Haverford College 
M.A., Columbia University 

Gilbert Thomas Hoag Dean 

A.B., Haverford College 

A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Aldo Caselli Comptroller 

D.S.E. and C, University of Naples 

Dean Putnam Lockwood Librarian 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Herbert William Taylor Physician in Charge 

A.B., Haverford College 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Louis Craig Green Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Thomas Edward Drake Curator of the Quaker Collection 

A.B., Stanford University 
M.A., University of Michigan 
Ph.D., Yale University 

Bennett Smedley Cooper Alumni Secretary and Assistant to the President 

B.S., Haverford College 

Seaton Schroeder Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Mrs. Ethel Elizabeth Beatty Dietician 

Amy Lydia Post Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Earlham College 

Mabel Sylvia Beard Resident Nurse 

R.N., Lankenau Hospital 

Alice Mattson Berry Secretary to the President 

Gertrude Mann Wonson Admissions Office 

B.S., Simmons College 



18 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
AND ADMINISTRATION 



The President and the Vice-President are ex-officio members of all committees. 
The President, the three elected divisional representatives of the Faculty, the 
Vice-President and tlie Dean compose the Academic Council. Under the chair- 
manship of the President this body meets occasionally to consider student peti- 
tions and matters of college policy. The elected members for 1946-47 are Messrs. 
Watson (Social Science) , Allendoerfer (Natural Sciences) , and Comfort 
(Humanities) . 

Academic Standing 
Mr. Benham, Chairman 
Messrs. Docherty^ Holmes, Pepinsky, Snyder 

Admissions 
Mr. Macintosh, Chairman 
Messrs. Allendoerfer, Kelly, Ufford, Watson 

College Program 

Mr. Oakley, Chairman 

Messrs. Cadbury, Fetter, Hoag, Lester, Teaf 

Curriculum and Honors 
Mr. Sutton, Chairman 
Messrs. Dunn, Hoag, Fetter, Wylie 

Fellowships and Prizes 
Mr. Comfort, Chairman 
Messrs. Coogan, Drake, Foss, Haddleton, Hetzel 

Graduate Students 
Mr. Flight, Chairman 
Messrs. Allendoerfer, Lunt, Steere, Wyue 

Library 
Mr. Sargent, Chairman 
Messrs. Braatoy, F. Evans, Green, Lockwood, Post 

Pre-Medical Education 
Mr. Meldrum, Chairman 
Messrs. Cadbury, Dunn, Henry, Pepinsky, Taylor 

Student Affairs 
Mr. Randall, Chairman 
Messrs. Asensio, Hoag, Rantz, Watson, Wiu.iamson 



19 



REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

The policy of Haverford College is to admit to the Freshman class 
those applicants who, in the opinion of the Committee on Admis- 
sions, are best qualified to profit by the opportunities which the 
College offers and at the same time to contribute to undergradu- 
ate life. Due regard is given not only to scholarly attainment, as 
shown by examination and by school record, but also to character, 
personality, and interest and ability in important extra-curricular 
activities. 

Whenever practicable, the College will arrange for the candidate 
to have a personal interview with the Director of Admissions or 
another administrative officer. Every applicant should realize that, 
in view of the limited enrollment, he is entering a competition for 
admission to a carefully selected and comparatively small student 
organization. On the basis of all information available — College 
Board reports, school record, class standing, evidence touching on 
character and personality — the application will be accepted or re- 
jected, and the decision of the Committee on Admissions is final. 
Preference will be given to those with superior records and creden- 
tials rather than to those with mere priority of application. 

Students who are accepted will be admitted without conditions. 
Those who, on entrance, show marked proficiency in certain sub- 
jects will be permitted to take courses usually not open to Freshmen; 
in such cases, however, the number of courses required for a degree 
will not be diminished. 

Each applicant for admission must take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test given by the College Entrance Examination Board, and 
some Achievement Tests given by the same Board. Applications 
involving divergence from the normal procedure must be discussed 
in detail with the Director of Admissions. In addition, the applicant 
must obtain blank forms from the College, on which he must sub- 
mit his school record and a certificate of character signed by his 
school principal. The school certificate must show satisfactory 
attainment in 15 units* of work. 

•A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, constituting approxi- 
mately a quarter of a full year's work. A four years' secondary school curriculum should be 
regarded as representing not more than 16 units of work. 

20 






Admission 21 

The preparatory course must include four years of English, at 
least a year and a half of Algebra and one year of Geometry, and 
three years of a foreign language. Cases involving divergence from 
the requirement should be discussed with the Director of Admis- 
sions. The remaining units will be drawn from laboratory science, 
social science, history', and additional mathematics and language. 

A candidate may offer an elective in a subject not usually listed, 
provided he shows proficiency which indicates an amount of study 
and intellectual effort commensurate with that required in other 
subjects. The subject chosen must have the approval of the Admis- 
sions Committee. 

Veterans who have not previously attended Haverford are re- 
quired to take the Special Aptitude Test for Veterans given by the 
College Entrance Examination Board. Information about this test 
is given below. Academic credit for courses taken elsewhere will 
be considered on an individual basis. 

Information Concerning College Entrance Board Tests 

In addition to the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College En- 
trance Board, which is required of all candidates for admission, 
each candidate shall take, after consultation with the Admissions 
Office, three of the Achievement Tests offered by the Board. 

The Board publishes a Bulletin of Information, which may be 
obtained without charge. It contains rules regarding applications, 
fees and reports; rules for the conduct of the tests; advice to can- 
didates; descriptions of the tests; sample questions, and lists of 
examination centers. 

Candidates should make application by mail to the College En- 
trance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. Blank 
forms for this purpose will be sent to any teacher or candidate upon 
request. When ordering the forms, candidates should state whether 
they wish forms for the December, April, June or August tests. 
Applications for any particular series will not be available until 
after the preceding series has been held. 

The College Entrance Examination Board will hold a complete 
series of examinations on each of the following dates during the 
academic year 1946-47: 



22 Haverford College 

Saturday, December 7, 1946 Saturday, June 7, 1947 

Saturday, April 12, 1947 Wednesday, August 27, 1947 

On each of the dates listed above, the schedule of tests will be 
as follows: 

8:45 A.M. — Scholastic Aptitude Test (three hours) 
8:45 A.M. — Comprehensive Mathematics Test, including a short 
form of the verbal section of the Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test (three hours) 
1.45 P.M. — Achievement Tests — not more than three of the 
following one-hour tests may be taken: 
English Composition Spanish Reading 

Social Studies Biology 

French Reading Chemistry 

German Reading Physics 

Latin Reading Spatial Relations 

1:45 P.M. — *Special Aptitude Test for Veterans (three hours) 
- — All candidates will take Section I, Section II, 
and one of the three options in Section III: 
Section I — Verbal 
Section II — Mathematical 

Section III — Spatial Relations or Physical Science 
or Social Studies Reading 
The schedule does not permit a candidate to take both the Schol- 
astic Aptitude Test and the Comprehensive Mathematics Test or 
both the Achievement Tests and the Special Aptitude Test for 
Veterans. 

Each application should be accompanied by the appropriate 
examination fee. A detailed schedule of fees follows: 

Both Scholastic Aptitude Test and one, two, or three 

achievement tests $9.00 

Both Comprehensive Mathematics Test and one, two, or 

three achievement tests 9.00 

Both Comprehensive Mathematics Test and Special Ap- 
titude Test for Veterans 9.00 

Scholastic Aptitude Test when taken alone 5.00 

Comprehensive Mathematics Test when taken alone . . . 6.00 
One, two, or three achievement tests when taken alone . 6.00 
Special Aptitude Test for Veterans when taken alone . . . 6.00 

* The Special Aptitude Test for Veterans will also be administered by the Board on the 
second and fourth Saturday afternoon of each month in the following cities : Berkeley, Cal. ; 
Cambridge, Mass.; Chicago, 111.; Los Angeles, Cal.; New York, N. Y. ; Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Washington, D. C. The fee for this test is six dollars. Veterans should 
secure application forms and other pertinent information directly from the Board. Only duly 
authorized veterans will be admitted. 



\ 



Admission 



23 



June 

1947 

Series 



August 

1947 
Series 



May 17 August 6 



May 10 July 30 



All applications and fees should reach the office of the Board not 
later than the dates specified in the following schedule: 

December April 

1946 1947 

Series Series 
For examination centers located 

East of the Mississippi River 
or on the Mississippi River November 16 March 22 

West of the Mississippi River 

or in Canada, Mexico, or 

the West Indies November 9 March 15 

Outside of the United States, 

Canada, Mexico, or the 

West Indies October 19 February 22 April 19 July 9 

Belated applications will be subject to a penalty fee of three dollars in addition 
to the regular fee. 

Candidates are urged to send in their applications and fees as 
early as possible, preferably at least several weeks before the closing 
date, since early registration allows time to clear up possible ir- 
regularities which might otherwise delay the issue of reports. 

The Board will report the results of the tests to the institutions 
indicated on the candidates' applications. The colleges will, in 
turn, notify the candidates of the action taken upon their applica- 
tions for admission. Candidates will not receive reports upon their 
tests from the board. 

Advanced Standing 
Since Haverford offers an integrated education, admission with 
advanced standing is ordinarily granted only in a limited number 
of cases. An undergraduate who comes from an approved college 
must submit an official statement of his honorable dismissal, to- 
gether with a full list of his accepted preparatory subjects, and a 
list of all his college courses, with his record therein. 



CURRICULUM 

General 

Haverford is a liberal arts college. Its curriculum is designed to 
give its students both a knowledge of the content and methods 
of the broad fields of liberal education, and a systematic training 
in testing, co-ordinating, and correlating information in a single 
field of concentration. 

Every student in full standing at Haverford College shall normally 
carry a program of five courses per semester for four years. To 
graduate, a student must have completed successfully the work of 
forty semester-courses, as well as two and two-thirds years of Physi- 
cal Education. The courses may be classified as follows: 

Required 2 

Limited Electives (either two or four in Foreign Language — 

see below) 10 or 12 

Major Concentration (average) 12 

Free Electives 14 or 16 

Total 40 

* Acceleration 

During the war, Haverford, like other colleges, made arrange- 
ments for students to complete the requirements for a degree in a 
shorter time than is normally required. With the return of peace, 
the Accelerated Program is now being dropped. 

Freshmen who entered in the fall of 1945, or thereafter, will be 
expected to meet the forty-course requirement for the degree. Those 
who have successfully completed one of the Summer Sessions at 
Haverford between 1942 and 1945 will be required to complete 
thirty-eight courses, and those who have completed two or more 
such Summer Sessions must complete thirty-six courses. The num- 
ber of Required Courses and Limited Electives and the average 
number of Major Concentration courses are the same for those 
who have accelerated as for those who have not. 

Hereafter, credit previously approved for Summer School courses 
taken elsewhere will be granted on a straight course basis toward 
the total number of courses required for a degree. 

Required Courses 

Two semester-courses in English are required of all Freshmen. 
Three terms of Physical Education are required of all Freshmen and 
Sophomores, and two terms of all Juniors. These courses in Physi- 

24 



Curriculum 25 

cal Education are in addition to the forty semester-courses required 
for a degree. 

Limited Electi\ts 

To secure breadth of distribution, every student is required to 
pass a certain number of courses, as indicated, in each of the follow- 
ing groups: 
The details of the requirement were changed during June, 1946. 

The new requirements, which must be fulfilled by all men enter- 
ing Haverford in September, 1946, and thereafter, are as follows: 

1. Foreign Languages: One full-year course in a foreign language 
beyond the elementary grade. For the purpose of this requirement, 
all foreign language courses with catalog number 1, with the excep- 
tion of Greek 1, are considered as of elementary grade. (N.B. A 
single full-year language course, if included among those listed un- 
der the Humanities requirements below, will satisfy the require- 
ments in both Group I and Group II.) 

2. Humanities: The requirement may be met by passing four 
semester courses from the list below: 

Biblical Literature la, 2b, ib, 6b, Sb. 

English Ub, I2a, Ua, Ub, 2lb, 22b, 26b, SOb, 326. 

French 16b, I7a, ISb, \9a, 196. 

German 5a, 6b, 11a, 12b. 

Greek 1, 2, 27a. 

History of Art (At Bryn Mawr College, with the consent of 
the Dean of Haverford College) . 

Latin 5a, 6b, 7, 366. 

Philosophy Sa, 5, la, 9a, IQb, lib, 15a. 

Music 1, 2. 

Spanish 5a, 6b, la, 86, 
Of these courses at least two must be from the following list of 
courses with a pronounced philosophical content: Biblical Litera- 
ture 46, 66; Philosophy 3fl, 5, la, 106; and at least two semester 
courses must be chosen from the above list in departments other 
than Biblical Literature and Philosophy. 

3. Natural Sciences: The requirement may be met by passing 
two semester courses in each of two of the following groups: 

(a) Biology 1 
Biology 2a, 26 
Psychology 1 

(b) Chemistry la^ 2 (a or 6) , 36 
Physics 1 



26 Haverford College 

Physics 2 
(c) Astronomy la, 2b 
Mathematics 1 
Geography and Geology 1 

4. Social Sciences: The requirement may be met by passing four 
semester courses from the list below, selected from at least two 
departments: 

Economics 1 

Government la, 2b, Sa, 9a, and certain other courses in the 

Government Department to be specified later. 
History 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 12a, lib 
Sociology \a, 2b, 4b 
The new requirements make no change in the required year of 
Freshman English. 

The earlier requirements, which apply to men who entered 
Haverford before September, 1946, are as follows: 

1. Foreign Languages: One full-year course in a language beyond 
the elementary grade. (N.B. A single full-year language course, if 
included among those listed in group 2, will satisfy the require- 
ments in both group 1 and group 2.) For the purposes of this require- 
ment, all foreign language courses with catalog number 1, with the 
exception of Greek 1, are considered as of elementary grade. 

Furthermore, it is the conviction of Haverford College that the 
study of Greek and Latin offers both general and specific values 
which ought not to be lightly omitted from the education of its stu- 
dents; in view of this conviction the College may advise and, where 
it deems necessary, is prepared to require the study of these subjects. 

2. Literature, History of Art, Music: One full-year course or 
two semester-courses chosen from the following: 

English Sb, Ub, \2a, Ua, Ub, 2lb, 22b, 2U, 26a, 266, 

27a, 306, 326, 366, 41a, 426, 43a 
French 166, 17a, 186, 19a, 196 
German 5a, 66, 11a, 126, 13a, 146, 15a, 17a, 186 
Greek 2, 3a, 46, 7a, 86, 9a, 106, 27a 
History of Art (all courses) 
Latin 5a, 66, 7, 9a, 106, 11, 17, 366 
Music 1, 2, 20a 
Spanish 5a, 66, la, 86, 9a, 106 

3. Laboratory Science: One full-year course involving labora- 
tory work in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, unless one such course 
was presented for entrance. 



Curriculum 27 

4. Biblical Literature, Philosophy, Sociology: One full-year 
course or two semester-courses chosen from the following: 

Biblical Literature la, 2b, 4b, 6b, 7a, Sb 
Philosophy Sa, 5, 7a, 10b, lib, 17 a, 18b 
Sociology la, 2b, ib, 5a, 6b 

5. Economics, Government, History: One full-year course or 
two semester-courses chosen from the courses offered by these 
Departments. 

Major Concentration 

A student may elect to major in any one of the following depart- 
ments: Astronomy, Biblical Literature, Biology, Chemistry, Eco- 
nomics, Engineering, English, French, German, Government, Greek, 
History, History of Art, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, 
Physics, Psychology, Sociology, Spanish. 

Definite requirements are stated under the name of each depart- 
ment on pages 46-75 and are understood as applying to the classes 
of 1948 and following. During the fourth term of his attendance 
each student should confer with the Major Supervisor of the depart- 
ment in which he wishes to major, and must apply to him for writ- 
ten approval of a program of courses for the last four terms. Such a 
program must provide for the completion, by the end of the Senior 
year, of no fewer than six courses, at least three of which must have 
been in the Major Department and the others in closely related fields. 
Should the student's application be rejected by the department of 
his first choice, he must immediately apply in another. Failure to 
file with the Dean, before the date specified on the College Calendar, 
a copy of his Major Program, signed by his Major Supervisor, will 
entail a fine of $5. Any student who continues delinquent in this 
matter will be debarred from the final examinations in his fourth 
term. Should the student's application be rejected by all the depart- 
ments to which he applies, he will not be promoted. 

A student who applies for permission to become a Major in any 
department may be rejected for scholastic reasons only. The College 
rule on this point is: 

If, at the time specified for application, the average of the grades 
obtained by a student in the "preliminary courses"* and "Major 

• "Preliminary courses" mean any courses the student may already have taken in the depart- 
ment for which he is applying. If the applicant has not already taken any courses in that 
department, the department should name courses in other departments which might be regarded 
as "preliminary." 



28 Haverford College 

Requirements" of any department is 75 or above, the student will 
be accepted by that department. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is below 70, 
the student will be accepted in that department only under excep- 
tional circumstances. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is 70 or above, 
but below 75, the decision will be at the discretion of the Major 
Supervisor. 

The student shall list on his Major registration form only those 
courses which constitute his Major Program. 

Each Senior must take a special Major examination (written, oral, 
or both) during the week preceding the final examination period. 
The passing grade for this examination is 70. In case of failure, a 
candidate may, with the permission of his Major Department, present 
himself for re-examination at a date (to be determined by the Major 
Supervisor) later than Commencement Day of the current year. 

If the re-examination is taken one year later, during the regular 
period of Major examinations, there is no fee. But if the candidate 
applies for re-examination at an earlier date (involving the prepara- 
tion of a special examination for one individual) and if the request 
is granted, the fee is |25. 

A student who has been formally accepted as a Major by any 
department has the right to remain as a Major in that department as 
long as he is in College. Should he wish to change from one depart- 
ment to another after the beginning of his fifth term, the change 
can be made only by the consent of the two Major Supervisors con- 
cerned and the Dean. 

In order to allow time for preparation for the Major examination, 
any Senior may omit, with the consent of his Major Supervisor, one 
non-Major half-year course in the second half-year. The time thus 
taken for preparation for the Major shall be technically called 
course 20b in the student's department of concentration. Hence 
there will be no diminution in the total requirement of forty 
semester-courses for the degree. 

Examination in the Major subject in courses taken in the Senior 
year may be omitted at the discretion of the Major Supervisor. 

Free Electives 
A number of courses sufficient to bring the total to forty semester- 
courses shall be chosen by the student, with the understanding that 
for the Freshman and Sophomore years the College reserves the 



Curriculum 29 

right, through the Faculty Adviser and the Dean, to prevent un- 
reasonable combinations of courses, and that in the Junior and 
Senior years the student will choose his free electives after consulta- 
tion with his Major Supervisor. 

Programs 
Freshman Program 
Although the Faculty Adviser is instructed to lay out for each 
Freshman a plan of study suited to his special needs, the Faculty 
requires that English be taken throughout the year, and recom- 
mends in all usual cases that Freshmen take one foreign language 
and courses in History, Mathematics, Science (but not more than 
one in each of these three Departments) . 

The courses open to Freshmen, in addition to the required work 
in English and Physical Education, are: 

Astronomy la Greek 1, 2, Sa, 4b 

Biblical Literature la, 2b History 1 

Biology 1, 2a History of Art 

Chemistry la, 2a, 2b, 36 (see Bryn Mawr Calendar) 

Engineering la, 2b, 106 Latin 1, 3, 5a, 6b, 7 

English 26 Mathematics 1 

French 1, 2, 3 Music 1 

German 1, 2, 3 Physics 1, 2 

Government 26, 3a Spanish 1, 2, 3 

In special cases, with the consent of the Dean, Freshmen may be 
admitted to certain other courses. 

In cooperation with the Departments of English and of Psychol- 
ogy the Dean administers a series of standard tests to all entrants 
within the first few days of each term. The results of these tests are 
used to help Freshmen readjust, if necessary, their selection of 
courses. These tests are also used to determine which Freshmen 
should be recommended to take the voluntary course in Remedial 
Reading. This course is offered each term, for no credit, to students 
who feel the need of establishing reading habits that will improve 
their comprehension and increase their speed when studying read- 
ing assignments. 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Programs 
Unless otherwise specified, all courses offered in any term are 
open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

Conflicting Courses 
A student is not allowed to elect conflicting courses, except with 
the permission of the Dean and the two instructors concerned. 



30 Haverford College 

Additional Courses 
In general, Freshmen will be permitted to take only five courses. 
Sophomores and upperclassmen may take a sixth course only if 
they have passed five courses in the preceding semester with an aver- 
age of not less than 80. Exceptions to this rule may be made at the 
discretion of the Dean in the case of Seniors in their last semester 
in college. A fee of $25 per semester is charged for every additional 
course. 

Special Cases 

Whenever a student gives proof of special abilities, the College 
is prepared to lay aside such requirements of the preceding plan 
as stand between him and the development of his gifts. 

Intercollegiate Courtesy 

Because of the cooperative relationship now existing between 
Bryn Mawr College, Haverford College, Swarthmore College, and 
the University of Pennsylvania, full-time students of one of these 
four institutions may, upon presentation of the proper credentials, 
enroll for courses in another institution of the group. This institu- 
tional courtesy does not involve the payment of additional fees 
except in laboratory courses. Visiting students will be charged the 
same laboratory fees or deposits as in their own institution. 

Students desiring to take advantage of this arrangement should 
secure permission from the Dean and from the chairman of the 
Department at the college in which the course is given. It is also 
desirable that the instructor giving the course be consulted in 
advance. It is the student's responsibility to register in the selected 
course on registration day at the institution where the course is 
to be given. 

Graduate students will obtain similar permission from the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Students. Ordinarily, the holder of a graduate 
fellowship will not be permitted to take more than one course in 
another institution for credit on his Haverford record. 

The Presidents of Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, and Haverford con- 
sult at regular intervals to further cooperative arrangements between 
their respective institutions. 

SPECIAL PLANS OF STUDY IN PREPARATION 
FOR PROFESSIONS 
A large number of Haverford College students desire, after grad- 
uation, to enter upon courses of study fitting them for professions. 



Preparation for Professions 31 

For students desiring preparation for the professional schools in 
Engineering, Medicine, and other highly specialized subjects the 
College offers combinations of courses which will prepare its grad- 
uates for admission, with full standing and in many cases with 
advanced credit, to the best professional schools in the country. 

To illustrate this feature of the curriculum sample outlines of 
study preparatory to specialization in Engineering, Medicine, Law, 
and Business Administration are presented on the following pages. 
Similar outlines might be prepared for other professions, such as 
Teaching, the Ministry, Journalism, Industrial Chemistry, etc. 

Each of the following outlines is, of course, only a sample, pre- 
senting one among many possibilities, and is not intended to be 
a prescribed program. 

PREPARATION FOR ENGINEERING 

Engineering today covers an extremely broad field of service, and 
there is, accordingly, no standard type of training suitable for all 
students preparing themselves for an engineering career. A typical 
four-year course in general engineering follows: 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Principles of Engineering Drawing, etc. Kinematics of Machines 

Engineering Orientation, Surveying, Analytical Mechanics 

etc. General Physics 

Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Calculus 

Analysis Elementary Economics 

Mathematics History or Foreign Language 
English 
Foreign Language 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Elements of Electrical Engineering Heat Engineering 

Fluid Mechanics Mechaqics of Materials 

An Introduction to Sociology Statistics 

Accounting The Corporation 

Humanities Limited Electives (3) Management and Industrial Relations 

Government and Business Elective in Engineering, Mathematics, 

Social Science Limited Elective Chemistry or Physics 

Seminar in Engineering Humanities Limited Elective 

Electives (3) 

Comprehensive Examination 
Seminar in Engineering 

PREPARATION FOR MEDICINE 

In consequence of the relatively large number of students who 
prepare for medical school at Haverford, the premedical program 
has become a distinctive feature of the work of the College. The 
program is under the direction of the Premedical Committee of the 
Faculty (see page 21) , the members of which stand ready to advise 
students on matters of premedical interest. The program makes 
provision not only for the necessary courses in the premedical 



32 Haverford College 

sciences but also for a sufficient number of courses in the non-science 
fields to ensure the student a well-balanced education. Over-special- 
ization in science in the premedical course is not encouraged by the 
College nor by the medical schools. The required courses in the 
premedical sciences number 8 (81/2 if the study of chemistry is 
begun in college) , so that an ample number of courses remain to 
meet any special requirements of the medical schools and the 
requirements of the College in limited electives, as well as to enable 
the student to choose a Major in accord with his scholastic interest. 
A premedical student is free to choose any Major for which he is 
qualified, but he must do creditable work in the premedical sciences 
in order to secure a favorable recommendation to medical school. 
The program of studies which satisfies adequately the require- 
ments for admission to medical school includes the courses listed 
below. Those in the premedical sciences should be taken in the 
years indicated in order to avoid schedule conflicts. 
First Year: General Biology (Biology 1) 

Inorganic Chemistry (Chemistry 2a) 

Qualitative Analysis (Chemistry 3&) 

Freshman Mathematics (Mathematics la, \b) 

Elementary German or French 
(German or French 1) 

Second Year: Organic Chemistry (Chemistry 5a, 6&) 

General Physics (Physics la, 1& or 2a, 2b) 
Elementary Psychology (Psychology la, 16) 
Intermediate German or French 
(German or French 2) 

Third Year: Quantitative Analysis (Chemistry 4a) 

Premedical Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 9&) 
Vertebrate Morphology: Embryology and Anatomy 

(Biology 3) 

Certain medical schools have additional specific requirements: 
Johns Hopkins University requires both French and German, and 
also elementary Latin; the University of Pennsylvania requires 
English literature; the University of Michigan requires botany; 
Harvard and Johns Hopkins require advanced organic chemistry; 
and so on. The premedical student must see to it that such special 
requirements of the medical school of his choice are met in his 
college program. Many medical schools advise that English, sociol- 
ogy, economics, philosophy, and other courses in non-science sub- 



Preparation for Professions 33 

jects be included in the premedical program. If American history 
has not been studied in high school, it must be taken in college in 
order to meet a requirement of State Boards of Medical Licensure. 
A premedical aptitude test, prepared by the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, is given each year, usually in December, and this 
must be taken by all candidates for admission to medical school in 
that year. Due notice of the date for this test will be given. 

PREPARATION FOR THE LAW 

Even those law schools which require that a person must hold a 
college degree to be eligible for admission do not usually specify 
what studies he shall have pursued in his undergraduate course. 
It is obvious, however, that a choice of electives may be made which 
will be of great value to the student in the study of law and later 
in the practice of his profession. It is recommended that the follow- 
ing courses be included in a student's program. In the case of 
tliose advanced courses which are given only in alternate years some 
variation in this program may be necessary. 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

English Composition and Literature American History 
Foreign Language, preferably Latin Elementary Economics 
A Modern Foreign Language Contemporary Legislation 
Mathematics English, Mediaeval, or Modern Euro- 
American Federal Government pean History 

State and Local Government 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Elementary Psychology American History 

English Constitutional History English Literature 

Government and Business English, Mediaeval, or Modern Euro- 

Constitutional Law pean History 

Accounting The Corporation 

Government Finance 
Development of Political Thought 

PREPARATION FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Students planning to continue study at a graduate school of busi- 
ness administration or to engage directly in business might arrange 
their programs for their Freshman and Sophomore years as above 
suggested for those planning to study law, but for their Junior and 
Senior years the following courses are recommended. 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Industry and Society Ethics 

Labor Organization and Business National Income and Investment 

Management International Trade and Finance 

Money and Banking Government and Business 

Accounting 

Introduction to Statistics 
The Corporation 



34 Haverford College 

Students expecting to enter manufacturing industries in any 
capacity are encouraged to take courses in Chemistry, Engineering, 
or Physics in order to become acquainted with the general nature of 
the processes and techniques involved in modern manufacturing. 

PREPARATION FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Students who are interested in entering the government service 
for work in Public Administration should have courses in Elemen- 
tar)' Economics, American History and Government, National 
Income and Investment, Political Theory, Government Finance, 
Accounting, Statistics, Constitutional Law, and Government and 
Business. 

GRADING OF STUDENTS 

In determining the standing of the student, daily recitations, hour 
examinations, and final examinations are all considered. Reports, 
with numerical grades and averages, are issued at the end of each 
semester. 

Freshmen are expected to obtain a general average for the year of 
at least 60 for promotion to the Sophomore class; Sophomores are 
required to obtain a general average for the year of at least 65 for 
promotion to the Junior class; Juniors, 70 for promotion to the Senior 
class; and Seniors, 70 for graduation. Students who fail to make 
promotion averages will normally be dropped from college. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student who achieves a grade of 50-60 (E) as his term mark in 
any course is allowed a special examination in September following 
the failure, immediately before the opening of College. Seniors 
who achieve 50-60 in any course (except in the Major Examination, 
see page 28) , are permitted to take the special examination during 
Commencement Week. These examinations, known as make-up 
examinations, are scheduled only upon written request by the 
student and on the payment of the fee of |5.00 for each examina- 
tion. The request and the fee must be received by the Registrar ten 
days before the opening of College in September. Late applicants 
are subject to an additional fee of $5.00. A student who achieves a 
grade below 50 is not permitted to take a special examination in 
that course. 



Delinquent Students 35 

A student with 50 or below as his term grade, or with 50-60 as his 
term grade in any course after the special examination privilege has 
lapsed or after taking a special examination, must repeat the course 
if it is a required course (repeated courses are recorded and averaged 
in the year of repetition) , or may substitute some other course if 
the failure is an elective course. No course may be repeated more 
than once; failure to pass a repeated required course will conse- 
quently prevent a student from obtaining this degree. 

When a student drops a course, an arbitrary grade of 40 shall be 
recorded by the Registrar unless the instructor turns in a lower 
grade, except that in unusual cases, with the permission of the 
instructor in the course and the Dean, a course may be dropped 
without a recorded grade. All recorded grades will be included in 
the semester average. 

A course once reported to the College office shall not be removed 
from the student's record. In the case of failure this shall apply, even 
though the credit deficiency has been made up by taking an extra 
course in a subsequent semester, or by applying a credit previously 
obtained. 

Any student whose record is such as to justify the belief that he is 
not availing himself of the opportunities ofiEered by Haverford Col- 
lege may be dropped. 



o3£lo 



DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

Students who have received credit for the full number of courses 
in prescribed and elective studies, provided they have attained a 
general average of 70 or above for the Junior and Senior years 
respectively, and provided they have passed their Major examina- 
tions with a grade of 70 or above, are granted the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The normal degree conferred upon 
all candidates meeting these requirements is that of Bachelor of 
Arts. However, upon request by the candidate and approval by 
the department concerned, the Bachelor of Science degree will be 
granted to men majoring in Natural Science, Mathematics, or 
Engineering. The fee for the Bachelor's degree is |15. 

Master of Arts and Master of Science 

Admissio7i to Cmididacy. — Graduates of Haverford College or an 
institution of equivalent standing, who present satisfactory evidence 
of character, seriousness of purpose, and scholarly attainments, may 
be admitted as candidates for the degree of Master of Arts or Master 
of Science. A candidate should have a reading knowledge of one 
foreign language, ancient or modern. 

Requirements. — A candidate who is well prepared for advanced 
study in his special field is required to pass four advanced courses 
(each with a grade of not less than 80) * and to do satisfactory addi- 
tional intensive work, which may take the form of a thesis or other 
research, equivalent at least to a full course. At least two of the 
courses and the additional intensive work must be in the same field 
and the remaining courses in allied subjects. In addition, the candi- 
date may be required, at the discretion of the professor in charge, 
to pass a comprehensive examination upon the field of his Major 
subject. The scope of the examination will be determined by the 
professor in charge, and will be communicated to the candidate 
when he is admitted as a graduate student. The entire plan of 
study must be drawn up by the candidate in consultation with the 
professor under whom he proposes to do the major part of his work. 
This plan must be submitted for approval before October 1 to the 
Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Students. After approval 

•In a full -year course in which credit is not granted for the work of a single term, the course 
grade is the average of the two temi grades; in other cases each term's work is a separate course, 
for the purposes of this requirement. 

36 



Master's Degree 37 

by this Committee, the program must be filed with the Registrar. 
Before award of the Master's degree the candidate must deposit two 
copies of his thesis in the College Library. 

A minimum of one year's residence is required, and a candidate, 
if well prepared, should be able to complete his work for the degree 
in this time. If his preparation is inadequate, a longer period of 
residence may be necessary, but candidates for the Master's degree 
must complete the required work in not more than two academic 
years. Courses taken before the registration of the candidate as a 
graduate student at Haverford College will not usually be counted 
toward the degree. 

Candidates who engage in any occupation or employment other 
than graduate study will not generally be able to satisfy the require- 
ments for the degree in one year. 

Fellowships. — Five graduate fellowships of |1000 each are avail- 
able every year primarily for members of the Society of Friends and 
for the graduates of other Friends' Colleges in the United States, 
who wish to proceed with their education in any department of 
Haverford College, provided the candidate and his proposed sched- 
ules of study are approved by the Committee on Graduate Students. 
Any recipient of a graduate fellowship should have additional re- 
sources of at least $300. Students must board and reside at Haver- 
ford College unless, by arrangement with the Dean, they live at the 
neighboring Quaker community of Pendle Hill. 

Applications should be accompanied by the following records: 
a certified list of the applicant's courses and grades as an under- 
graduate; a statement of his draft status; three letters concerning 
the character, personality, financial condition, and qualifications of 
the applicant; a copy of the catalog of the institution in which the 
applicant was an undergraduate; and a small photograph. Appli- 
cations and other material should be in the hands of the Dean of 
Haverford College before March 1 to secure consideration for the 
following year. 

Charges, — For charges and fees see pp. 40-42. 



HONORS 

Honors are awarded for excellence in the studies of single depart- 
ments. They are never given merely for performance of routine work 
in courses; a considerable amount of extra work is demanded in 
every case. 

Honors are of three kinds: Honorable Mention, Preliminary 
Honors, and Final Honors. 

Honorable Mention* will be awarded at the end of the Freshman 
or Sophomore years for work in a single course meeting at least two 
hours per week throughout the year, and additional work to the 
total amount of not less than 75 hours. Candidates for Honorable 
Mention must obtain a minimum grade of 85 in the regular work 
of the course and creditably pass an examination on the additional 
work required. Two courses of one term each in the same depart- 
ment may be construed as a single course. 

A Freshman who has received the prescribed grade in the regular 
work of a course required for Honorable Mention, but who has not 
done the additional work required in connection with that course, 
may do so, with the consent of the professor in charge, during the 
Sophomore year. 

Preliminary Honors will be awarded at the end of the Sophomore 
or Junior year for work in not less than four semester courses 
in a single department, and additional work to the total amount 
of not less than 150 hours. Candidates for Preliminary Honors must 
obtain a minimum average grade of 85 in the courses required for 
such honors (including a grade satisfactory to the Department in 
the courses taken in the Sophomore or Junior year) , and must 
creditably pass examinations on the additional work required. 

Final Honors are graded as Honors, High Honors, or Highest 
Honors. They will be awarded upon graduation only to students 
whose work in a Major field of concentration has been done with 
marked distinction and has been more profound or more extensive 
in its scope than the minimum required. The award of Honors is 
at the discretion of the Major Department, but the award of High or 
Highest Honors is to be made by vote of the Faculty upon recom- 
mendation of a department or group of related departments. In order 
to receive High or Highest Honors, the student will usually be given 
a public oral examination, and for Highest Honors the verdict of 
an outside examiner may be obtained if deemed desirable. The vari- 

* Honorable mention is awarded in Freshman English in connection with the work English 2d. 

S8 



Honors 39 

ous departments and divisions will adopt such specifications for 
Final Honors as they see fit. 

At the time of the award of Honors one-half of one per cent for 
each award of Honorable Mention or Preliminary Honors shall be 
added to each recipient's general average for the year. Honors, 
High Honors, and Highest Honors shall automatically add one, 
two, and three per cent, respectively, to the average for the Senior 
year of each student receiving one of these awards. 



FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS 

ROOMS 

Entering Freshmen are assigned rooms in the order in which their 
application blanks for admission (see page 22) are received. It is, of 
course, not always possible to meet the desire of Freshmen for the 
cheapest rooms. Twelve of the $100 rooms are regularly reserved for 
Freshmen. The College assumes that a new student will accept any 
available room of approximately the same price as the room for 
which a preference is expressed. The choice of rooms by other stu- 
dents is governed by published rules. 

A deposit of $35 is required of all new students at the time their 
application is accepted. A similar deposit is required also by those 
students who have not been in attendance at the college during the 
term immediately preceding the one when they are planning to 
return to Haverford College. This amount will be deducted from 
their bill for the following year. If the student fails to present him- 
self at the beginning of the term for which he has been enrolled, 
the deposit will be forfeited. 

Students are expected to treat their own and College property with 
the same consideration as in their own homes. A student is held 
financially responsible for any damage to his room, and any damage 
wilfully done will be sufl&cient reason for requesting withdrawal 
from the College. 

EXPENSES 

The tuition charge for all regular students is $500 for the academic 
year. Tuition for special students is $65 per course per term. The 
total charge for tuition, board ($11 per week) , and room rent ($100 
to $225, according to location) varies from $974.00 to $1089.00 for 
the year. These charges, which are subject to alteration by the Board 
of Managers, include heat, electric light, attendance, and the use of 
necessary bedroom furniture, i.e. a bureau and a bed, the linen for 
which is furnished and laundered by the College. Students will 
supply their own study furniture, blankets, and towels. In general, 
two students share one study and each has his private bedroom 
adjoining. A few single rooms are also available. 

The College requires that bills rendered August 15th and Janu- 
ary 15th for the Fall and Spring semesters for room and board, tu- 

40 



Expenses 41 

ition, activity fee and deposit for incidentals be paid in full before 
the beginning of the semester. It is suggested that in order to avoid 
last minute congestion, bills be paid by mail in advance. Course 
cards will be issued in person at the Comptroller's office. 

No reduction or refund of the tuition charge will be made after 
the first two weeks of any semester. If a student shall withdraw 
before the completion of the first two weeks, there shall be a com- 
plete refund of his tuition. In case of illness or absence for any 
reason from the College, for four weeks or more, there will be a 
prorated refund of his board. In case of withdawals at any time, 
there will be no reduction or refund of room rent for the semester 
unless the same room is re-rented, in which case the withdrawal 
occupant will receive the amount paid to the College by the new 
occupant. Other fees cannot be refunded for any reason whatever. 

Additional expenses include textbooks, which need not exceed 
$25-$40 a year, and various fees and special charges. A list of these 
will be supplied on request by writing to the office of the Comptroller. 
They include fees for repeated courses, make-up examinations, de- 
grees, and late registration. 

COLLEGE RESPONSIBILITY 

The College is not responsible for loss due to fire, theft, or any 
other cause. Students who wish to cover the fire risk may apply for 
information at the office of the Comptroller. 

The College is not responsible for accidents or injury even if sus- 
tained in the course of training or instructions. A coverage of $500.00 
per accident is offered by means of a group accident policy written 
by "Accident and Health Department of the General Accident As- 
surance Corporation of Philadelphia, Pa." Application blanks will 
be mailed for the convenience of parents together with original bills 
covering regular charges. Premium is $13.00 per calendar year. 

MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

Since some parents may prefer to pay tuition and other college 
fees in equal monthly installments during the academic year, we 
are glad to offer this convenience under The Tuition Plan. The 
cost is 4% greater than when payment is made in cash at the begin- 
ning of each term. 

LOAN FUND 

A loan fund is available for deserving students, other than mem- 
bers of the Freshman Class and transfer students during their first 
year, who may require financial assistance during their college course. 



42 Haverford College 

PLACEMENT BUREAU 

Plans have been carried out for the development of a more effective 
Placement Bureau for those who wish to avail themselves of this 
service. Information regarding opportunities for employment is be- 
ing made available to undergraduates and graduates who wish as- 
sistance in securing employment. Part-time work is found for those 
who desire it while in college. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The College Administration has delegated to the Students' Asso- 
ciation the responsibility for nearly all aspects of student conduct 
on the campus; and the Students' Association has assumed this 
responsibility. Student Government is exercised through an elected 
Students' Council, on which are representatives of all the classes 
and of some of the undergraduate organizations. 

The students at Haverford College believe that the success of 
self-government depends upon personal honor and individual quali- 
ties of moral integrity and social responsibility. The basis, there- 
fore, of Student Government at Haverford is the Honor System, 
which is a compact entered into by all members of the Students' 
Association. The Honor System upholds certain standards which 
represent the considered opinion of the Students' Association on 
what is desirable conduct on the campus. It is not restricted to the 
conduct of examinations and the preparation of papers outside of 
class. It covers every phase of college life. It applies to the rules gov- 
erning the presence of women in the dormitories, and to other stand- 
ing regulations, which are enforced through the Students' Council 
with the active cooperation of all members of the Students' As- 
sociation. 

The Students' Council is an administrative and judicial body. It 
handles all phases of the administration of regulations for the 
Students' Association. It manages the operation of extra-curricular 
activities on the campus and allocates to each a percentage of the 
Student Activities Fee ($15 per year, charged to every undergradu- 
ate) on the basis of a yearly budget. In intercollegiate relations it 
serves as the representative of the Haverford student body. 

The chairmanship of the Students' Council is the most important 
undergraduate office. The Chairman represents the student body 
before the Board of Managers, the College Administration, and the 
Faculty. He serves both as liaison officer and executive. He conveys 
to the College Administration the recommendations of the Students' 
Council in disciplinary matters. 

The Honor Pledge, which is quoted below, is called to the atten- 
tion of each applicant for admission to Haverford College. It is 
signed upon entrance, and is signed again whenever the student 

43 



44 Haverford Colij:ge 

takes an examination, though its force is not limited to examina- 
tions only. In signing the pledge the individual student accepts the 
Honor System in its entirety, as currently in force and as it may be 
changed while he is an undergraduate at Haverford. Every enter- 
ing student should make sure, before selecting Haverford, that he 
can give his active support to the Honor System. He should realize 
that its success, which is of great importance to him personally and 
to the whole student body, and indeed to the College itself, depends 
upon his willingness to give it his complete support. 

Honor Pledge 
I hereby accept the Haverford College Honor System, realizing 
that it is my responsibility to safeguard, uphold, and preserve each 
part of the Honor System and the attitude of personal and collective 
honor upon which it is based. 

SOCIETIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

The Students' Association. This organization is composed of all 
undergraduates in good standing at Haverford. It is the body for 
student self-government at Haverford. On its Council are represen- 
tatives of the four classes, of the Customs Committee, of Cap and 
Bells, and of the Haverford News. 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Haverford Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society is Zeta of Pennsylvania, chartered in 1898. Elections at 
Haverford are held for students at the end of the Junior year and 
at the end of the Senior year. 

Founders Club. This Haverford honorary society, established in 
1914 as an organization of students, alumni, and faculty, seeks to 
recognize by election to its membership those undergraduates who 
combine a sound academic record with noteworthy participation in 
extra-curricular activities. Elections are usually made from the 
Junior and Senior classes, except in unusual cases where Sophomores 
are chosen. 

Cap and Bells Club. The Haverford dramatic organization, com- 
posed of graduates and undergraduates, sponsors dramatic produc- 
tions. The Club has collaborated with those of Bryn Mawr and 
Swarthmore in putting on plays and musical productions. 

Nautical Club. The Club provides intercollegiate racing and gen- 
eral sailing for members who have had some experience and those 
who desire to learn to sail. It keeps four dinghies on the Delaware 
River. Intercollegiate meets are held each semester and teams have 



Student Activities 45 

gone to Annapolis, Boston, and the Coast Guard Academy in 
New London. 

Radio Club. A campus broadcasting station is operated as Sta- 
tion WHAV. Programs are presented throughout the year. 

Other Organizations. The following groups are also active at 
Haverford: Glee Club, Varsity Club, Debate Council, Biology Club, 
Chemistry Club, Classical Symposium, Engineering Club, Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Mathematics Club, Film Club, Spanish Club 
and French Club. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Haverford News, a student publication, appears weekly dur- 
ing the college year. Each issue contains a section of Alumni news. 

The Record, Senior yearbook, is distributed immediately before 
commencement. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The normal course at Haverford College, except in modern lan- 
guages, is three hours per week. The laboratory equivalent for a lec- 
ture hour is customarily two and one half hours. Variations in this 
general rule are noted in the listing of the particular course. Some 
of the courses listed are not offered during the current year. 

ASTRONOMY 

The William J. Strawbridge Memorial Observatory enables stu- 
dents to become familiar with a variety of astronomical instruments, 
and to acquire from actual observation a practical acquaintance 
with astronomy. 

The equipment consists of three equatorially mounted telescopes; 
a 10-inch and a 4i/^-inch refractor and a 6-inch reflector; a reflecting 
telescope with 8-inch mirror and altazimuth mounting; a meridian 
circle telescope of 3^-inch aperture; a zenith telescope of 2i4-inch 
aperture; a spectrohelioscope; an astrographic mounting provided 
with two 4-inch Ross lenses and a 4-inch guiding telescope; two 
sidereal clocks; a chronograph by Bond; and other instruments. The 
astronomical library is housed in the Observatory. 

Major Requirements 

Astronomy la, 3a, 4b, 6b, 9a, 10b. Three courses to be chosen from Mathe- 
matics 2, 3, and Physics 2, 3. 
Three written comprehensive examinations of three hours each. 

la. Descriptive Astronomy — Mr. Green 

A general course open to all students. 

The leading facts of astronomy, with elementary explanation of the methods 
and instruments by which they are ascertained. A portion of the time is 
devoted to the study of the constellations, the handling of the telescopes and 
simple problems. No fee. 

3a, 4b. Astrophysics — Mr. Green. 

A study of the state of matter in interstellar space, in the atmospheres and 
interiors of the stars, and inf the diffuse nebulae. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and 
Mathematics 2. No fee. 

6b. Observational Astronomy — MR. Green. 

Visual and photographic observations of the sun, moon, planets, and stars. 
Spectroscopic observations of the sun. Determination of latitude, longitude and 
time. Prerequisite, Astronomy la. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

9a, 10b. Special Topics in Astrophysics — Mr. Green. 

The content of this course may vary from year to year to suit the needs of 
advanced students. It may be repeated for credit. 

46 



[ 



Courses in Biblical Literature 47 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

The courses in this Department are designed to cover broadly the 
history, literature, and religion of the Bible, with their backgrounds 
in the culture in which they developed and to which they contributed. 
Additional courses are offered in the ancient history of the Near East, 
the Hebrew language, and comparative religion. Sufficient scope is 
thus provided to meet the varied interests of students electing courses 
in the Department and to offer either introductory or advanced work. 

A gift enabled the late Professor Grant to make a series of five field 
excavations at a site in Palestine, the archaeological yields of which 
are exhibited in the Beth Shemesh Museum, third floor of Sharpless 
Hall. These materials reveal the life of a typical Near East commu- 
nity in the many aspects of its development and interplay with other 
peoples over a span of 2000 years. Thus, the collections provide a 
laboratory for study of the cultural cross-currents which met in 
Palestine during one of the great formative periods of civilization. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Biblical Literature. 

Six other half-year courses in either Biblical Literature or related departments. 

Special study of one selected Biblical field, e.g., history, literature, the Old or 
New Testament. 

A comprehensive examination covering the history, literature, and criticism of 
the Bible; and the religious and moral life of the Hebrews, Jews, and Christians. 

la. Introduction to the Old and New Testaments — Mr. Fught. 
The literature of the Bible with its historical background. 

2b. The Rise of Christianity — Mr. Fught. 

A study of the background, early development, and spread of the Christian 
movement, up to the third century, as reflected in the New Testament, par- 
ticularly in the book of Acts and the letters of Paul and in the writings of the 
Church Fathers. 

[Not offered in 1946-47; to be offered in 1947-48.] 

4b. Development of Christian Thought within the Bible — Mr. Flight. 

A study of the origins and development of the basic ideas in the teaching of 
religious leaders from the prophets to Paul. 

6b. Comparative Religion — Mr. Flight. 

A comparative study of the great living religions, their founders, their scrip- 
tures, their characteristic ideas and ideals. 

7a. Ancient History of the Near East — Mr. Fught. 

The Beginnings of Western Civilization in the Cultures of the Near East; 
Archaeological and Historical. 

(Also called History 7a.) 

8b. The English Bible — Mr. Flight. 

History and literary art of the English Bible, particularly the King James version 
and its influence on general literature. 

[Not offered in 1946-47; to be offered in 1947-48.] 
(Also called English 86.) 



48 Haverford College 

9a or 10b. Biblical and Oriental Conference — Mr. Flight. 

Individual work to be elected by the student from one or more of the following 
divisions of the field: literature, archaeology, history, philosophy. Prerequisite, 
other work in the Department, in which a grade of B has been attained. 

11. Hebrew — MR. Flight. 

Grammar, composition, and reading of simple Old Testament prose. 

BIOLOGY 

The Department of Biology offers courses for students who wish 
to enter medical school; for students who wish to engage in graduate 
work, teaching, or conservation; and for students who wish a general 
knowledge of plants and animals. 

Most medical schools require General Zoology for admission. 
Vertebrate Morphology is required by some and advised by others. 
General Botany is required by a few. Most graduate schools require, 
as a prerequisite for work in Biology, a reading knowledge of French 
and German; Chemistry la or 2a and Sb, 5a, 6b; Physics 1 or 2 
(or Geography and Geology 1, depending on the student's field of 
interest) ; and at least Biology 1 and 2a, 2b. For advanced experi- 
mental Biology, Chemistry ba, 6b may be necessary. 

A gift from the class of 1915 enables the Department to house and 
display the extensive collections of the College so that they are 
available to anyone interested in the natural history of the Phila- 
delphia area. 

Major Requirements 

Biology 1, 2a, 2b, 7, and one of 3, 4, and 5. 

Two courses chosen from Pliysics 1 or 2, Chemistry la or 2a and 3b, Math. 13b, 
and Geography and Geology 1. 

Reading and reporting on approximately 15 biological books, besides those read 
in connection with courses. This is to be done at any time between the end of 
Sophomore year and date of the comprehensive examination. 

A comprehensive examination on the courses taken and the reading done is 
required. This examination will be partly written (approximately 4 hours) and 
partly oral. 

1. General Zoology — Four hours. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry, and Mr. F. C. Evans. 
The lectures of this course include a survey of the structure and relationships of 
animals, of the fundamental principles of living organisms, and an outline of the 
more important questions relating to evolution, heredity, and distribution. The 
laboratory periods are devoted to obtaining an acquaintance witli the more impor- 
tant types of animal life. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. A fee of 
$8.00 per semester is charged. 

2a. General Botany — Four hours. Mr. Henry. 

The fundamental principles of Botany and the application of plant science to 
human welfare are discussed in the lectures. The laboratory work consists of a 
study of the morphology, physiology, and life history of representatives of the 
principal groups of plants. This is a brief course designed to fit the needs of the 
student not majoring in science. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

2b. Systematic Botany — Mr. Henry. 

This course, a continuation of Biology 2a, consists of a systematic study of the 
major plant groups. Prerequisite, Biology 2a. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 



Courses in Biology 49 

3. Vertebrate Morphology (Anatomy and Embryology) — Three hours. Mr. 
Dunn and Mr. Henry. 

The laboratory work of this course indudes the dissection of the principal types 
of verteljrates. The lectures deal with the development, status, and history of the 
organ systems of vertebrates. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

4. Local Flora — Mr. Henry. 

The work of this course consists of the identification of representative Angio- 
sperms, together with the study of their taxonomy and distribution. Collecting in 
the field will supplement laboratory work. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, Biology 2a and 2b. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

5. Entomology — Mr. Henry. 

This course has been designed to give the student a knowledge of the anatomy 
and physiology of insects. The laboratory work consists of the dissection of a rep- 
resentative of each of the larger Orders. Particular emphasis is placed on the 
structures used in identification, and permanent mounts are made of many of 
them. The preparation of local collections is required as part of the work. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 
per semester is charged. 

7. Evolution, Heredity, and Other General Biological Problems — Mr. Dunn. 

This is a general cultural course, intended not only for students of Biology, but 
for all who wish to be informed on recent developments in the field of biology, 
especially for students of Sociology, Philosophy, and History. Special emphasis is 
given to the modern theories of evolution and of heredity. Open, without pre- 
requisite, to Juniors and Seniors. No fee. 

10. Seminar Courses — Required of candidates for Honors in Biology. 

Open only by permission of the instructor. 

Vertebrate Zoology — Classification and evolution of vertebrate groups. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 1, Biology 3 or with Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Advanced Morphology — Study of morphological problems in animals. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Ecology and Distribution — Problems of habitat relationships or geographical 
relationships of plants and/or animals. Prerequisite, Biology 1 or Biology 2a and 
Sb. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry, and Mr. F. C. Evans. 

Advanced Botany — Studies in comparative anatomy of plants. Prerequsite, 
Biology 2a, 4, 8b. Mr. Henry. No fixed fee. 

CHEMISTRY 

The courses in Chemistry are all listed as one-semester courses. 
When they are taken in certain sequences they afford a developing 
knowledge of the science. Chemistry la and 2a (or 2.b) are of a 
general nature, dealing with the fundamentals of the subject with 
some application of the scientific method. Chemistry 2a (or 2b) is 
prerequisite to all other courses in the Department. Freshmen 
electing chemistry will normally take Chemistry \a and 2h, in the 
first and second semesters respectively; but those who have had 
chemistry in school may be permitted to take Chemistry 2a in the 
first semester and to continue with Chemistry 3& in the second. If a 
Freshman takes Chemistry la and 2b in his first year and wishes to 



50 Haverford College 

continue with chemistry, he must make provision to take Chemis- 
try 36 in the second semester of his Sophomore year. 

The courses approved by the American Chemical Society for the 
professional education of chemists, which should be completed by 
students expecting to apply either for admission to the universities 
as graduate students in chemistry or for professional positions in 
industrial chemistry, include those listed for the Major (see below) 
together with Chemistry 14b and 16b. Chemistry 7a and Sb, but 
not 9b, meet the requirement in physical chemistry. For the chem- 
istry courses required for premedical preparation see page 00. 

Major Requirements 

The requirements for the Chemistry Major may be met by either of the follow- 
ing programs of courses: 

(1) Primarily for prospective chemists and chemical engineers: Chemistry 2a, 
3b, 4a, 5a, 6b, 7a, 8b, 13a, 15b; Physics 2. 

(2) Primarily for premedical students: Chemistry 2a, 3b, 4a, 5a, 6b, 9b (or 
7a and 8b) , 13a, 17a; Biology 1, 3; Physics 1 or 2. 

Candidates for final honors in chemistry are required to take, during the 
Junior and Senior years, at least three of the short seminar courses offered by 
the Department, such as Chemical German Reading, History of Chemistry, Glass- 
blowing, and Recent Advances in Chemistry. 

la. Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Duisberg. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have not had chemistry in school. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the fundamentals of chemistry, the 
preparation, properties, and uses of the more common elements and their com- 
pounds, and the application of the general principles of chemistry to industrial 
processes. A fee of $6.00 is charged. 

2a or 2b. Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have had chemistry in school 
or who have passed Chemistry la. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with fundamental principles, the extrac- 
tion and properties of metals, the periodic law, aqueous solutions and the ionic 
theory, and the structure of atoms and molecules. A fee of $6.00 is; charged. 

3b. Qualitative Analysis — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Cadbury. 

Lectures on reaction kinetics and the application of the ionic theory to analyti- 
cal processes and to electrolytic phenomena. The systematic qualitative analysis 
of inorganic materials using the semimicro method constitutes the laboratory work. 
A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2a or 2b. 

4a. Quantitative Analysis — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the general principles of gravimetric, 
volumetric, electrolytic, and colorimetric methods of analysis. A fee of $6.00 is 
charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 3b. 

5a, 6b. Organic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Duisberg. 

A study of aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds. In the laboratory, 

experiments illustrating the synthesis and chemical properties of such substances 

are carried out. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2. 

7a, 8b. Physical Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A study of the general properties of matter using both the kinetic and thermo- 
dynamic methods, colligative and electrolytic properties of solutions, reaction 



Courses in Chemistry 51 

velocity and catalysis, adsorption, colloids, and the phase rule. The laboratory 
work involves illustrative physico-chemical measurements. A fee of $6.00 is charged. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 4a and Mathematics 2. 

9b. Premedical Physical Chemistry — Three hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A lecture and conference course dealing particularly with those phases of 
physical chemistry which find application in physiology, physiological chemistry, 
and other medical school subjects. Among the topics discussed are: gases and 
solutions, hydrogen ion concentration and pH and their measurement, reaction 
velocity and catalysis, enzyme action, adsorption, and colloids. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 4a. 
11a. Qiemical Thermodynamics — Three hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A detailed study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics and their 
application to chemical systems; the development and use of the third law. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry la and 8h, and Mathematics 2. 

[Not offered in 1946-17.] 

13a. Advanced Organic Chemistry — Three hours. Mr. Duisberg. 

A study of stereochemistry, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, essential 
oils, and alkaloids. The laboratory work involves the identification of organic 
substances by classification reactions and by the preparation of derivatives. A fee 
of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5a and 6b. 

14b. Organic Syntheses — Three hours. Mr. Duisberg. 

A study of organo-metallic compounds, rearrangements, unsaturated systems, 
and special preparative reactions of organic chemistry. Special syntheses consti- 
tute the laboratory work. A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5a 
and 6b. 

15b. Advanced Quantitative Analysis — Three hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

Lectures and conferences dealing with general methods for the quantitative 
determination of the elements and the analysis of industrial materials. The lab- 
oratory work includes the complete quantitative analysis of certain inorganic 
materials. A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chemistry 4a. 

16b. Advanced Quantitative Analysis — Three hours. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with micro, semimicro, and other special 
methods of quantitative analysis. A fee of $6.00 is charged. Prerequisite, Chem- 
istry 4a, 5a, and 6b. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

17a or 18b. Chemical Research — Mr. Meldrum, Mr. Cadbury, and Mr. 
Duisberg. 

Open only to Senior chemistry Majors and to graduate students in chemistry. 
May be elected as one or more courses. No fixed fee. 

20b. Chemistry Major — Mr. Meldrum, Mr. Cadbury, and Mr. Duisberg. 

Seniors majoring in chemistry will meet with members of the Staff for one 
period per week for a critical discussion of the chemical principles studied in the 
courses and the application of these principles to modern developments in the 
science. 

21a, 22b. Special Topics in Theoretical Chemistry — Mr. Meldrum. 
Open only to graduate students in cliemistry. No fee. 
[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

ECONOMICS 

The instruction in Economics is intended primarily to give stu- 
dents an understanding of the working of modern economic society. 
The advanced courses are designed to give a liberal education and 
to arouse an informed interest in public affairs, as well as to meet 
the needs of men going into business or finance, or going on to grad- 



52 Haverford College 

uate work in economics or business administration. Several of the 
advanced courses are designed to be of special value to men planning 
to enter the foreign service or other fields of government work, or 
going into journalism or law. A number of the courses acquaint the 
student with significant source material and with research methods 
in economics, and give practice in the preparation of analyses and 
reports. 

Men majoring in Economics should take supporting work in the 
fields of Government, History, and Sociology, and are encouraged to 
take Introduction to Statistics, offered by the Department of Mathe- 
matics. Mathematics 1 is a prerequisite to Statistics. 

Economics 1 is elective for Sophomores and is a prerequisite to all 
other courses in Economics. It may be taken by Freshmen on the 
recommendation of the Dean, and by Juniors and Seniors with the 
permission of the professor in charge. 

Major Requirements 

Economics 1, 3a, 9a, 13a, and three other half-year courses in Economics. 
Mathematics 13b (Introduction to Statistics) may be considered as one such half- 
year course. 

Sociology la, and three other half-year courses in supporting fields, as approved 
by the professors concerned. 

Selected readings on the history of economic thought and on current economic 
problems. 

A seven-hour comprehensive examination covering a review of the Major courses 
and the readings. A part of the comprehensive examination may be oral. 

1. Elementary Economics — Mr. Fetter, Mr. Teaf, and Mr. Watson. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the main features of 
modern economic life, and to develop an understanding of the principles under- 
lying economic relationships. Emphasis is laid on the application of these prin- 
ciples to present-day problems. 

3a. Money and Banking — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of the history and principles of money, credit, and banking, with par- 
ticular reference to American conditions. Such problems as monetary standards, 
price movements and their effects, foreign exchange, commercial banking, and 
central banking and the Federal Reserve System are considered. 

4b. International Trade and Finance — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of foreign trade and exchange, international payments and trade prob- 
lems connected therewith, money and banking in their international aspects, and 
international indebtedness. 

5a. Labor Relations — Mr. Watson. 
(See Sociology 5a.) 

6b. Management and Industrial Relations — Mr. Watson. 
(See Sociology 6b.) 

8b. Government Finance — Mr. Herndon. 
(See Government 8b.) 



Courses in Economics 53 

9a. Accounting — 

The balance sheet and statement of profit and loss, the classification of accounts, 
the theory of debit and credit, the books of original entry and of record, opening 
and closing the books, corporation accounts, reserves, etc. Discussion is accom- 
panied by practice problems. This course is intended to provide an understanding 
of accounting sufficient for students going into the professions as well as a founda- 
tion for advanced accounting courses for those who will go into business. 

[Offered in second term 1946-47.] 

10b. Tlie Corporation — MR. Teaf. 

Economic functions and legal responsibilities of the corporation and its mem- 
bers; types of securities; general financial policy; the distribution of securities; 
expansion, combination, and reorganization. Social problems created by the 
growth of corporations are given special attention. Prerequisite, Economics 9a. 

[Offered in first term, 1946-47.] 

11a. Government and Business — Mr. Teaf. 

A study of the historical development, economic basis, and the present problems 
of the regulation of business organization and policies by government. Special 
attention is given to such topics as the trust movement, anti-trust legislation, the 
Federal Trade Commission, competitive practices, cartels and trade associations. 

(Also called Government 11a.) 

13a. National Income and Investment — MR. Fetter. 

A study of the meaning of national income and the methods of ijieasuring it; 
it5 distribution in the United States; the economic effects of the allocation of 
national income as between consumption, investment, and hoarding; the signifi- 
cance of investment in the modern economy; the effects of governmental policy 
upon income distribution. 

Enrollment limited. A seminar course intended primarily for economics Majors, 
but also open to qualified students from other departments. 

14b. Seminar in Economic Problems — Mr. Fetter. 

This seminar will deal with an economic problem of current importance, with 
emphasis on the relation between economic analysis and the formulation of 
public policy. 

The subject of the course may shift from year to year, or the same topic may be 
continued for several years, depending on developments in world economic affairs. 
In case of a shift in the subject matter of the course, it may be repeated for credit. 

In 1946—17 the course will deal with Latin American economic problems, with 
special reference to their bearing on the United States. 

15a, 16b. Seminar — Mr. Fetter and Mr. Teaf. 

Readings, reports, and conferences on selected topics, to meet the individual 
needs of graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll for this 
course after specific arrangement with the chairman of the Department. 

Economics 17b. Readings in Foreign Economics — MR- Fetter. 

This course is to train men in the reading of economic literature in foreign 
languages, and to familiarize them with current economic publications and with 
the principal economic journals and sources of commercial and statistical infor- 
mation appearing in foreign languages. Intended primarily for economics Majors, 
but qualified men in other fields will be admitted. 

The course will be given as demand warrants, with reading in French, German, 
or Spanish to meet the needs of individual students. Men admitted to the course 
ordinarily must have the equivalent of two years of college study in the language 
to be covered, but by special permission a man with only one year may be admitted. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 



ENGINEERING 

The objective of the Engineering Department of Haverford Col- 
lege is to prepare students in the fundamentals of engineering by 
giving them training in the sciences and engineering, together with 
a broad liberal arts background under the influence of the philosoph- 
ical and religious atmosphere available to all Haverford students. 

Students not intending to enter the highly specialized fields of 
design and research will find the Haverford courses ample for their 
needs. Graduates of Haverford who have majored in engineering 
are admitted to the student-engineers' courses of the leading indus- 
trial companies on equal terms with graduates of the larger engineer- 
ing colleges. Those who desire more specialized training before 
entering the active work of the profession are granted substantial 
credit toward advanced standing in technical institutions or are 
admitted to their graduate schools. 

The engineering courses are conducted in the Hilles Laboratory 
of Applied Science, a modem building containing classrooms, draw- 
ing rooms; a departmental library; mechanical, electrical, and elec- 
tronics laboratories. 

Exceptional facilities for observing the practical side of the work 
are offered by the many manufacturing companies in and near Phila- 
delphia, and frequent inspection trips are made. 

A typical selection of courses for those majoring in engineering 
is outlined on page 31. 

The specific courses offered by the Department are described below; 
but, in addition, others may be arranged to cover special needs. 
Application for admission to such courses should be made to the 
professor in charge. Engineering 13a, lib, and 23a, 2ib may be 
counted as courses in Physics for the purpose of satisfying any cur- 
riculum requirements. 

Major Requirements 

Engineering la, 2b, 7a, 8b. 13a, 14b, 15a, 16b. 

Chemistry la or its equivalent, Mathematics 2, Physics 2, and two additional 
half-year courses from Engineering, Mathematics, Physics, or Chemistry. 

Engineering seminar and comprehensive examination. 

Courses in Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry shall be considered prelim- 
inary courses as defined on page 27. 

la. Principles of Engineering Drawing and Shop Methods — Mr. Hetzel 
and Mr. Rantz. 

Lettering, projection, perspective, sketching, conventions,- detail and assembly 
drawings, checking, and blue printing. Text: French, Engineering Drawing, and 
French and McCully, Engineering Drawing Sheets. Woodworking and pattern- 
work in shop. Inspection trips. A fee of $11.00 is charged. 

2b. Engineering Drawing, Orientation, Surveying, and Shop Methods — 

Mr. Hetzel and Mr. Rantz. 

54 



Courses in Engineering 55 

Additional work on detail and assembly drawings for a complete machine. 
Exercises in machine-tool work, in plane surveying, and in the mechanical labora- 
tory. Lectures will be arranged by outside specialists in the various branches of 
engineering for orientation purposes. Inspection trips. A fee of $11.00 is charged. 

5a. Shop Methods — Mr. Rantz. 

Machine-tool work on the lathe, planer, milling machine, shaper, etc. Reference 
reading and reports on modem production methods, costs and time studies. A fee 
of $12.50 is charged. 

7a. Kinematics of Machines — Mr. Hetzel. 

Velocity and acceleration analysis of mechanisms; cams, belts and chains, gears, 
etc. Occasional inspection trips. Text: Keown and Faires, Mechanism, and 
Headley, Problems in Kinematics. A fee of $5.00 is charged. 

8b. Analytical Mechanics — Mr. Hetzel. 

A study of forces and moments of forces; determination of forces in trusses and 
cranes; centroids and center of gravity; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; trans- 
lation and rotation of bodies; work, power, and energy; impulse and momentum; 
balancing and moments of inertia. Prerequisite or parallel course. Mathematics 2. 
No fee. Text: Seely and Ensign, Analytical Mechanics for Engineers. 

10b. Materials of Engineering — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of the production and engineering properties of metals, their alloys, and 
the more important non-metallic materials. Laboratory exercises on the testing 
machine, heat treatment, microscopic study of metals, hardness testing, etc. Text: 
Mills, Materials of Construction. Inspection trips. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 

11a. Fluid Mechanics — Mr. Holmes. 

The properties of fluids; statics and dynamics of compressible and incompressible 
fluids; accelerated liquids in relative equilibrium; Reynolds' number; Bernoulli's 
theorem; flow of fluids in pipes, orifices, and nozzles; flow with a free surface in 
channels and weirs; impulse and momentum in fluids; resistance of immersed 
and floating bodies; cavitation and dynamic similitude. A fee of $5.00 is charged. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

12b. Thermodynamics — Mr. Holmes. 

Energy, gas laws, vapors, mixtures of gases and vapors, flow of fluids, theoretical 
and actual thermodynamic cycles for power and refrigeration. No fee. 

13a. Elements of Electrical Engineering — Four hours. Mr. Ufford. 

Direct current circuits and machinery. The course includes electroraagnetism, 
induced electromotive force, electric and magnetic fields, direct current motors 
and generators, commutation, armature reaction, parallel operation of gener- 
ators and the systems for distributing direct current. Text: Cook, Elements of 
Electrical Engineering. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 

14b. Elements of Electrical Engineering — Four hours. Mr. Ufford. 

Alternating current circuits and machinery. Single and polyphase circuits, 
transformers, induction motors, generators, synchronous motors, single phase 
motors, transmission and distribution of alternating current and illumination. 
Text: Cook, Elements of Electrical Engineering. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 

15a. Heat Engineering — Four hours. Mr. Holmes. 

This course includes a study of steam and gas engines, turbines, condensers, 
air-compressors, steam boilers, power-plant economies, and cost of power. Text: 
Severns and Degler, Steam, Air and Gas Power. 

One laboratory period a week is required. The laboratory exercises parallel the 
classroom work and include boiler and engine testing, fuel tests, gas analysis, 
calibration of instruments, etc. Comprehensive reports for each test are required. 
Inspection trip. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 



56 Haverford College 

16b. Mechanics of Material — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of stress and strain; of beams and columns; of shafting; of girders, 
trusses, combined stresses, etc. A series of tests on the testing machine is made 
by each student. Text: Laurson and Cox. Mechanics of Materials. Inspection 
trips. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 

18b. Internal Combustion Engines — MR. Hetzel. 

A course on gasoline and Diesel engines, with particular attention to thermo- 
dynamics and the subject of fuels. Special topics may be arranged according to 
the interests of the group. Lectures, assigned reading, problems, laboratory experi- 
ments, inspection trips. No fixed fee. 

23a. Alternating Current Circuits — Mr. Ufford. 

Resonance phenomena, coupled circuits, non-sinusoidal voltages and currents, 
recurrent networks, polyphase circuits, impedance and power measurements in 
three phase circuits, non-harmonic voltages and currents, transmission lines and 
transients. Text: Weinbach, Alternating Current Circuits. No fixed fee. 

24b. Electromagnetic Engineering — Mr. Ufford. 

Microwaves, transmission lines. Maxwell's equations, plane waves, reflection, 
wave guides, resonators, radiation from antennas and coaxial lines. No fixed fee. 

25a, 26b. Special Projects in Engineering. 

Students majoring in Engineering are encouraged to do individual work in spe- 
cial fields of investigation. Each student devotes the time equivalent to one or two 
semester courses in comprehensive reading or experimental work and reports on 
some particular topic. No fixed fee. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The Department believes it essential to insure that all undergrad- 
uates should be able to use the English language efficiently in their 
college courses, regardless of the nature of those courses. Freshmen, 
therefore, are required to prove their ability in this respect. 

It believes, further, that the departmental curriculum must provide 
a general cultural background for those students whose interests are 
chiefly scientific or technical. It offers, therefore, intermediate courses 
in English and American literature. 

It believes, finally, that courses must be provided for students who 
intend to do graduate work in literature or related fields. It offers, 
therefore, advanced courses designed both in content and method to 
train students with serious special interests. 

The Department recognizes that these intentions cannot be rigidly 
differentiated, and there is no intention that they should be. Consid- 
erable freedom of selection is possible for the individual student after 
appropriate consultation. 

The attention of slow readers is called to the remedial work in 
reading offered by the Department of Psychology. 

Major Requirements 

An individual program equal to six courses of two terms each, made up 
principally from the advanced English courses with the approval of the Major 
Supervisor, and stressing the Elizabethan and nineteenth-century literature. 
^English lib, 21b, 22a, 23b, 41a, 42b, and 43a) . 



Courses in English 57 

1 (a or b). Composition and Methods — Mr. Lester, Mr. Snyder, and Mr. Fox. 
Written composition, public speaking, methods and techniques of college 

work. 

2 (a or b) . Types of English Literature — MR. Sargent, Mr. Snyder, and Mr. 
Warren. 

Introduction to the study and appreciation of literature through reading 
and analysis of significant works of drama, poetry, fiction, and expository prose. 
Frequent papers and oral reports. 

4b. Intermediate Composition and Oral Discussion — Mr. Hoag. 
Practice in expository writing and in the techniques of public discussion. 

8b. The English Bible — Mr. Flight. 

(See Biblical Literature 8b.) 
[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

lib. Shakespeare — Mr. Sargent. 

Reading and study of twelve plays, with emphasis on features of general 
and popular interest. Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

12a. Contemporary Drama — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of the techniques and practice of the modern drama, as illustrated 
in the works of Ibsen and the best modern dramatists of England and America. 
Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

14a. American Literature to the Civil War — Mr. Spaeth. 
Lectures, discussions, and frequent papers. 

14b. American Literature from the Civil War to the Twentieth Century 

— Mr. Spaeth. 

21b. Nineteenth-Century Prose and Minor Poets — Mr. Lester. 

Lectures and discussions, with special emphasis on the novel and contro- 
versial prose. 

22a. Nineteenth-Century Poets — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of six poets: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Keats, and 
Tennyson. Lectures and classroom discussions. 

23a. Elizabethan Literature — Mr. Sargent. 

Chief writers of the English Renaissance, omitting Shakespeare. Prerequisite, 
English lib. 

26a. Eighteenth-Century Literature — Mr. Snyder. 
The novel and the drama. 

26b. Eighteenth-Century Literature — Mr. Warren. 

Dr. Johnson and his Club. The chief poets. Pope, Gray, and Burns. Ossian. 

27a. €reek Literature in English — Mr. Post. 

(See Greek 27a.) 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussion, and personal conferences. Juniors and 
Seniors. 

28a. Creative Writing — Mr. Sargent. 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussion, and personal conferences. Junior and 
Seniors. 

30a. Chaucer — Mr. Hoag. 

Brief account of Middle English; main emphasis upon literary qualities of 
Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. 



58 Haverford College 

32b. British and American Literature of the Twentieth Centurj- — Mr. 

Sargent. 

Fiction and verse by selected writers from Conrad and Crane to Auden and 
Hemingway. Prerequisite, two term courses in English beyond the Freshman 
year. 

36b. Latin Literature in English — Mr. Lockwood. 

(See Latin 36b.) 

41a. Special Topics in Nineteenth-Century Literature — Mr. Lester. 

Studies in the development of nineteenth-century thought as expressed in 
English Literature. Three papers will be required of each student. Required 
of all English Majors. Apply in advance. Prerequisite, English 21b. 

42b. Special Topics in Poetry — Mr. Snyder. 

Important treatises on poetics from Aristotle to Whitman. An intensive study 
of Browning's poems. Required of all English Majors. Apply in advance. Pre- 
requisite, English 22b. 

43a. Methods of Literary Scholarship — Mr. Sargent. 

An introduction to the aims, problems, and methods of research in English 
literature by means of an advanced study of Shakespeare. Bi-weekly reports 
and one piece of original investigation. Required of all English Majors. Apply 
in advance. Prerequisites, English lib and English 23b. 

44b. Special Projects in English and American Literature — Mr. Snyder, 
Mr. Sargent, Mr. Hoag, and Mr. Lester. 

(Offered to cover only the most unusual situations. Apply in advance to the 
instructor in whose special field the proposed work lies.) 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

1. Geography and Geology — Mr. Dunn. 

A discussion of the general principles of these sciences, with special reference to 
North America, and to the Philadelphia region. Practical work in mineralogy, 
physiography, and stratigraphy is required. Three lectures a week (one omitted 
at option of instructor) . Open to Juniors and Seniors without prerequisite. 

GERMAN 

German 1, 2, 3, and 9a [lOb] are primarily language courses. The 
remaining courses are devoted primarily to the history of German 
literature or to the intensive study of special periods or authors. 
The courses in literature are open to Juniors and Seniors, and to 
especially well qualified Sophomores. 

Opportunity is given to students who complete German 1 or Ger- 
man 2 with distinction to advance rapidly into higher courses by 
passing a special examination on a prescribed program of collateral 
reading. 

Major Requirements 

German 3, 5a, 6b. 9a [lOb], 11a, 12b, 13a. 14b, 15a. 

Supporting courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Kelly. 

A comprehensive examination covering: 1. The German language; 2. History 
of the German language; 3. German literature; 4. German history. 1517-1914; and 
5. A special period, literary movement, or author. 



Courses in German 59 

1. Elementary German — Five hours (three hours credit) . Mr. Kelly and Mr. 

COOCAN. 

Grammar, conversation, and the reading of simple texts. 

2. Intermediate German — Mr. Kelly, Mr. Coogan, and Mr. Davis. 

Texts of moderate difficulty are read both in class and as outside work. One hour 
a week is devoted to composition. German is the language of the classroom. 
Scientific German may be chosen as collateral reading. 

3. Advanced German — Mr. Kelly. 

Reading of standard works of German literature. Composition and Conversa- 
tion. The collateral reading may be done in literary or scientific German. 
Prerequisite, German 2 or the equivalent in school. 

5a. The Beginnings of Modem German Literature — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of Lessing and the early works of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be 
arranged, first half-year. Prerequisite, German 3. 

6b. The Classical Period of German Literature — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the mature works of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be arranged, 
second half-year. Prerequisite, German 5a. 

10b. Advanced Composition and Conversation — Mr. Coogan. 
Prerequisite, German 3 or the equivalent. 

11a. History of German Literature from its Origins to the Seventeenth 
Century — Mr. Coogan. 

Lectures in German, with collateral reading in modem German translation. 
Discussions. Written and oral reports. Prerequisite, German 3. 

12b. History of German Literature from the Seventeenth Century to the 
Present — Mr. Coogan. 

A survey course with lectures in German. Collateral reading. Discussions. 

Written and oral reports. Prerequisite, German 3. 

13a. German Romanticism — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the Romantic movement in Germany and its relations to similar 

movements in England and France. Prerequisite, German 3. 

14b. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century — Mr. Kelly, 

GOVERNMENT 

Courses in Government are designed with three purposes: to pro- 
vide an understanding o£ the philosophy behind and the evolution 
of political ideas; to study contemporary forms and processes of local, 
state, national, and international government; to provide training 
for students planning to enter public service, journalism, or the law. 

Major Requirements 

Government 3a, 4b, 17a, and 18b. 

Any four other courses of one term each in Government. 
Any four other courses of one term each in any of the social sciences. 
A three-hour examination in political philosophy. 

A four-hour examination in other courses taken in the Department of Govern- 
ment. 



60 Haverford College 

la. Elements of Political Science — Mr. Braatoy. 

3a. American Federal Government — Mr. Meade. 

A study of the origin and structure of the American Federal governmental 
system. 

This course is intended primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores, and is a pre- 
requisite for advanced courses in this Department. 

4b. American Federal Administration — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the administrative methods, problems, and philosophies of the 
American Federal Government: a continuation of Government 3a. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

5a. Contemporary Legislation — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the technique of legislation and an analysis of certain selected bills 
currently before Congress. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

6b. American Constitutional Law — Mr. Meade. 

A study of the principles of constitutional interpretation and of the leading 
decisions of the Supreme Court. This course also includes readings in selected 
works on constitutional development and lectures on the essentials of jurisprudence. 

Prerequisite, Government 3a or 4b. 

7a. American Political Parties — Mr. Meade. 

A study of political parties and pressure groups in the United States, includ- 
ing such topics as party organizations and platforms, conduct of elections, lobbies, 
legal controls over parties, and political machines. Prerequisite, Government 
3a or 4b. 

8b. Government Finance — Mr. Herndon, 

A study of the general principles of public revenues, public expenditures, public 
indebtedness, fiscal administration, and of the principles of equity in the distri- 
bution of tax burdens. Prerequisite, Government 3a unless Economics 1 has been 
passed or is being taken concurrently. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

9a. International Relations — Mr. Braatoy. 
Prerequisite, Sophomore standing. 

10b. State and Local Government — Mr. Meade. 
A study of the structure and administration of state and local government. 

11a. Government and Business — Mr. Teaf. 
(See Economics 11a.) 

13b. American Foreign Policy — Mr. Braatoy. 

The evolution of American thinking on inter-governmental relations, par- 
ticularly in the Twentieth Century. 

14b. International Law and Organization — Mr. Meade. 

Designed to acquaint students with the existence, scope and authority of 
international law, and the foundations, accomplishments and progress of inter- 
national organization. 



Courses in Greek 61 

15a. Contemporary Government and Social Systems — Mr. Braatoy. 

A study of the democratic and totalitarian systems, with particular reference 
to Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Pre- 
requisite, Junior standing. 

16b. Theories of Social Progress — Mr. Braatoy. 

National and international perspectives of reconstruction in political thought 
and practice. 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought — Messrs. Steere, Foss, 
and Post. 

(See Philosophy 17a, 18b.) 

19b. Contemporary International Policies — Mr. Braatoy. 

The political, economic and social bases of conflicting nationalisms and the 
attempts at a reconciliation by isolationist, imperialist and regional means 
and by worldwide cooperation. 

27b. Public Opinion and Propaganda — Mr. Meade. 

A study of the nature of public opinion with reference to forces moulding 
or changing it, and an analysis of propaganda techniques and application, with 
special attention to the influence of pressure groups on the democratic society. 



GREEK 

Instruction in Greek aims to familiarize the student with the 
thought and cukure of ancient Greece. Greek language is important 
for its relations to other European languages and for its effect on 
modern scientific terminology, particularly in medicine. 

Greek literature and thought continue to be an important force 
in the modern world; in connection with their study the recurring 
principles of behavior, statecraft, philosophy, and drama are stressed. 

Major Requirements 

Greek 3a, 4b, and four half-year courses from Greek 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 11a, 12b, 
27a, and History 13a. 

Three additional courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Post. 

If Greek 2 is not taken in college, an additional half-course will be required. 

A comprehensive examination on Greek language and literature, Greek history, 
and Greek civilization. 

1. Elementary Greek — Mr. Post. 

Thorough study of the elements of the language followed by the reading of 
simple Attic prose. This course should be taken in the Freshman year, if possible. 

2. Intermediate Greek — MR. Post. 

A rapid reading course in such authors as Homer, Herodotus, and Euripides. 

3a, 4b. Advanced Intermediate Greek — Mr. Post. 

Selections from Plato, Menander, Aristophanes, and the tragedians are read. 



62 Haverford College 

7a, 8b. Advanced Greek — MR. Post. 

The instructor will arrange with students electing this course a systematic 
study of special subjects in Greek philosophy, history, or literature in connection 
with the reading of Greek authors. 

9a, 10b. Advanced Greek — MR. Post. 

A continuation of the work done in Greek 7a, 8b. 

11a, 12b. Advanced Greek Prose Composition — Mr. Post. 

This course should be taken by all candidates for final honors in Greek. 

27a. Greek Literature in English — Mr. Post. 

Lectures on Greek literature. Reading of Greek poetry, drama, and literary 
criticism in translation. Essays and discussions. No knowledge of Greek is required 
in this course, but a general acquaintance with English literature is essential. 

(Also called English 27a.) 

fflSTORY 

The study of History provides a background against which many 
current problems may be viewed to advantage, and it helps to develop 
critical standards for the evaluation of evidence. It is further impor- 
tant as a foundation for professional studies in fields such as public 
administration, journalism, and the law. 

Major Requirements 

Four full -year courses (or three full -year courses and two half-year courses) in 
History, other than History 1. 

Two full-year courses or their equivalent in related departments. 
Four review examinations of three hours each. 

1. English History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of political, constitutional, economic, and social history, intended as 
an introductory course. Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

2. Foundations of the United States, 1492-1865 — Mr. Drake and Mr. 
Paullin. 

Lectures, reading, and discussion in American colonial and early national his- 
tory. Not open to Freshmen. 

3. National Development of the United States, 1865 to the Present — Mr. 

Drake and Mr. Paullin. 

A study of institutional growth, with the larger social and political issues of 
the present considered in their historical setting. A lecture, reading, and discus- 
sion course, intended primarily for Juniors and Seniors. 

4. English Constitutional History — Mr. Lunt. 

A study of the formation and growth of English institutions, designed to be 
useful particularly to those who are interested in government and law. Elective 
for Junior and Seniors. 

5. Mediaeval History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from the time of the barbarian invasions to 
about 1500. Elective for Sophomores who have had History 1, and for Juniors 
and Seniors. 

6. Modem European History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from about 1500 to the present. Elective 
for Sophomores who have had History I and for Juniors and Seniors. 



Courses in Latin 63 

7a. Ancient History of the Near East — Mr. Flight. 
Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 
(See Biblical Literature 7a.) 

10b. History of Europe, 1914-1939 — Mr. Lunt. 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

13b. Greek History — MR. Comfort. 

A survey of Greek history, with frequent reports on the art, archaeology, and 
political institutions of Greece. A knowledge of Greek is not required. 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

HISTORY OF ART 

The undergraduate courses in History of Art given at Bryn Mawr 
College are regularly open to Haverford students, who may also 
elect History of Art as their subject of Major Concentration. Haver- 
ford students may likewise do special work at Bryn Mawr for 
Honors in History of Art. 

For description of courses, and for rules and regulations con- 
cerning Major Concentration and Honors work, see the current 
Bryn Mawr College Calendar. Students planning to study at Bryn 
Mawr College should consult the Dean of Haverford College. 

HUMANISTIC STUDIES 

la, 2b — Mr. Post. 

This course is designed to introduce students to the life and literature of the 
Far East, through the use of translations, and to develop their mastery of a major 
field and of expository writing. G. Nye Steiger, A History of the Far East, is recom- 
mended for supplementary reading. Essays, weekly or biweekly, for discussion at 
individual meetings with the instructor. It may be taken as one or two half-courses 
in either half-year by a limited number of students who will be admitted only 
after a personal interview and only if there is still room for them when they apply 
to the instructor. 

LATIN 

The courses in Latin supplement the intensive foundation work 
of the secondary school by means of more extensive reading over a 
wider range of literature, illustrating successive eras of culture from 
the third century B.C. to the sixteenth century A.D. By inculcating 
a fuller knowledge of the Latin language as a tool, the same courses 
open the door to a better command of English, Romance languages, 
philosophy, and history. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses in Latin (not including 1, 3, 5a, and 6&) . 

Two additional full-year courses in other departments, arranged in conference 
between the student and the professors in charge. 

A comprehensive written examination on Roman history, literature, and civiliza- 
tion, and the classical heritage of medieval and modern times. Candidates for 
honors must also take an oral examination. 



64 Haverford College 

I. Elementary Latin — Mr. Comfort. 

Grammar, reading, composition. Prepares students for Latin 3. 

3. Cicero — Mr. Lockwood. 

Orations of Cicero and readings in other prose authors. 

5a, 6b. Vergil — Mr. Lockwood. 

Six books of Vergil's Aeneid and readings in other Roman poets. 

7. Survey of Classical Roman Literature — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of classical authors from Plautus to Suetonius. Emphasis will 
be laid on literary history and appreciation. Text: Lockwood, A Survey of Classical 
Roman Literature. 

9a, 10b. Readings in Latin Literature — Mr. Lockwood and Mr. Comfort. 
Individual work. Each student may select a field of reading which is correlated 
with liis other college courses (e.g., in philosopliy, history, Romance languages, or 
English literature) or he may pursue more intensive work in one of the periods or 
one of the literary types surveyed in Latin 7 or II. 

II. Survey of Medieval Latin Literature — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of selections from the post-classical. Christian, and medieval 
Latin writers. Study of the phases of European civilization represented in Latin 
literature. 

13a or 14b. Advanced Prose Composition — Mr. Lockwood. 
Either I3a or 14b is required of candidates for final honors. 

17. Roman Law — Mr. Lockwood. 

Reading of selections from the Institutes, the Digest, and other texts and sources 
of Roman Law. 

36b. Latin Literature in English — Mr. Lockwood. 

Lectures on Latin literature and civilization. Reading of Roman prose and 
verse, including some of tlie Christian writers. No knowledge of Latin is required. 
(Also called English 36b.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Freshman Mathematics is designed to provide that background of 
trigonometry, algebra, analytic geometry, and elementary calculus 
which is essential for any serious student of the natural or social 
sciences and which is culturally desirable for many others. 

The more advanced courses are arranged to meet the needs of 
three groups of students: 

(1) Mathematics majors. The department major prepares for 
teaching in preparatory schools, for graduate study leading to college 
teaching or industrial research, and for statistical and actuarial work. 

(2) Students of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering, who should 
take Mathematics 2 and, in many cases. Mathematics ^a, 4b, 8b and 
11a. 

(3) Students, such as economists and biologists, who need statistics 
in their major fields and who should take Mathematics 13a and lib. 



Courses in Mathematics 65 

Major Requirements 

Mathematics 1, 2, 3a, 4b, 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 11a, and 16b. 

Recommended collateral courses are Physics 2, 9a, 10b; or for prospective 
actuaries Economics 1, 9a. 

Prescribed parallel reading on the history and general principles of 
mathematics. 

Three written comprehensive examinations, each three hours in length. An 
oral examination will be required for final honors. 

It is recommended that facility in reading French and German be acquired 
as early in the college course as possible. 

1. Freshman Mathematics — Four hours. Mr. Oakley, Mr. Allendoerfer, 
Mr. Holmes, Mr. Green. 

Plane trigonometry, including logarithms and the solution of triangles. Func- 
tions and graphs; elements of differential and integral calculus; analytic geome- 
try in the plane with applications to conies and other curves; introduction to 
the geometry of three dimensions. Selected topics in college algebra. 

For students presenting trigonometry for entrance to college an advanced sec- 
tion will be operated in which the trigonometry is replaced by advanced solid 
geometry and additional topics in college algebra. 

The second half of this course is offered during the first semester by Mr. Holmes. 

2. Calculus — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Differential and integral calculus with applications. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 1. 

3a. Differential Equations — MR- Green. 

Methods of solution of the standard types of ordinary differential equations 
with applications to problems in physical science. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

4b. Advanced Calculus — Mr. Green. 

Advanced topics in calculus including infinite series, elliptic integrals, partial 
derivatives, Jacobians, line integrals, and Stokes' Theorem. Prerequisite, 

Mathematics 2. 

7a. Tlieory of Equations — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Advanced topics in the theory of equations; introduction to modern abstract 
algebra. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

[Offered 1946-47; not to be offered 1947-48.] 

8b. Vectors and Matrices — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

The algebra of vectors, vector spaces, and matrices with applications to mathe- 
matical physics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

[Offered 1946-47; not to be offered 1947-48.] 

9a. Advanced Analytic Geometry — Mr. Wilson. 

Advanced plane and solid analytic geometry. Homogeneous coordinates. 
Introduction to the geometry of n-dimensions. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

10b. Projective Geometry — Mr. Wilson. 

Projective geometry based upon the axiomatic method. Synthetic and analytic 
aspects are considered. Introduction to Non-Euclidean Geometry. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 2, 9a. 

11a. Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Series. 

Problem course with many applications to Chemistry, Engineering, and 
Physics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 3a, 4h. 
[Not offered 1946-47; to be offered 1947-48.] 



66 ' Haverford College 

13a. Introduction to Statistics — Mr. Oakley. 

Tabular and graphic method, frequency distribution, averages, measures of 
central tendency, dispersion and skewness, correlation, tests of significance. 
Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1. A fee of $5.00 is charged. 

[Offered 1946-47; not to be offered 1947-48.] 

14a. Advanced Statistics, Elementary Probabilities, and Finite Differences 

— Mr. Oakley. 

This course is designed for students who are interested in statistical and 
actuarial work. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 and 13a. 

[Offered in first and second semesters 1946-47; normally offered in second 
semester of alternate years; not to be offered 1947-48.] 

15a or 16b. Special Topics — Mr. Oakley, Mr. Allendoerfer. 

The content of this course may vary from year to year to suit the needs of 
advanced students. The course may be repeated for credit with change of 
content. 

MUSIC 

In addition to a considerable collection of musical scores and books 
in the general library, the special equipment of the Music Depart- 
ment consists of a collection of phonograph records, scores, and books 
presented in 1933 by the Carnegie Corporation and amplified by 
yearly accessions to double its original size (ca. 1600 records) , sev- 
eral pianos, and a Hammond organ. 

The Alfred Percival Smith rooms in the Haverford Union are re- 
served for music study. There is a larger room with a Steinway Grand 
for , the holding of classes and informal concerts organized by the 
Music Department, and a small library in which valuable books, 
scores and records are kept. 

The large concerts are held in Roberts Hall where a concert piano 
is at the disposal of artists. 

Major Requirements 

Three full-year courses in Music and three full-year (or six half-year) courses 
in related fields such as History of Art; German 17a; English 23a; Physics 12b; 
History 5, 6; or other courses in Music. These courses are to be arranged in 
conference with the professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: 

(1) The History of Music. Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge 
of all styles from the mediaeval chants to the romantic era, as well as a special 
knowledge (acquaintance with sources) of one particular period, preferably 
anterior to 1600 A.D. 

(2) Musical Composition. Candidates will be expected to submit compositions 
involving three and four part writing for voices (in free counterpoint) and 
instrumental scoring for an orchestral ensemble of the classical type. 

1. Foundations of Music — Mr. Swan. 

In the first semester this course takes up the study of melodic writing in two 
and three parts (counterpoint) , preparatory to which is a thorough practice in 
the modes. All the while certain models from the 16th century are studied. 
In the second semester writing for instruments is undertaken, the formal models 
for which are analyzed from the practice of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. The 
whole course involves the laying of scientific foundations for the study of music. 
Fundamental musical senses are discussed. 



Courses in Philosophy 67 

Texts: Medtner, The Muse and the Fashion. 

Morris, Contrapuntal Technique of the 16lh Century. 

Morris, Foundations of Practical Harmony and Counterpoint. 

Nef, An Outline of the History of Music. 

2. Musical Craftsmanship — Mr. Swan. 

A continuation of Music 1 intended for students who are able to attempt 
composition on a larger scale (sonatina, sonata, string quartet, small orchestra) . 

4. Inslrumenlation (in combination with the Departments of Physics and Psy- 
chology) — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A study of the orchestral instruments from the point of view of their tone-color 
and tone-production, their idiosyncrasies and limitations, and the effects of combi- 
nation in ensemble. An intimate study of the scores of master works will be made. 
A knowledge of harmony and performance on a musical instrument is prerequisite. 
Text: Forsythe, Orchestration. 

20a. Music History to the End of the Sixteenth Century — Mr. Swan. 

A required course for Music Majors. The study of the available sources from 
the Ars Antiqua to the last Netherlanders. Playing of a cappella scores at the 
piano. Reading of Besseler's Musik des Mittelalters und der Renaissance and 
Ludwig's edition of the works of Machaut. (Knowledge of German very useful.) 

21a. Advanced Musical Composition — Mr. Swan. 

A required course for Music Majors. Includes composition in sonata form. 

22a. Advanced Orchestration (by arrangement with the University of Penn- 
sylvania) . 

PHILOSOPHY 

The courses in Philosophy are intended to help men face and 
examine the great issues of life, to acquaint them with the major 
currents of reflection upon the nature of the universe, and to assist 
them in finding their own way to a more ordered and intelligent 
relation with their world. The work aims to acquaint the students 
with the great classical thinkers and movements of philosophy and 
to put them in touch with present day philosophical and political 
discussions. 

Major Requirements 

Psychology la; Philosophy 5, 7a. 

Four other half-year courses in Philosophy. 

Four half-year courses in related fields to be arranged in conference with the 
professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: three hours on the History of 
Philosophy and three hours on one optio;ial field selected from Topics in Philos- 
ophy since 1800, or Religious Thought, or Psychology. 

3a. Introduction to Philosophy — Mr. Foss. 

An understanding of the nature and function of philosophy and of its relations 
to other fundamental human interests such as science, religion, and art is sought 
through a consideration of representative philosophical problems. Philosophy 3a 
is recommended but not required. 

5. History of Philosophy — Mr. Foss and Mr. Steere. 

A study of the development of philosophy with special reference to Plato. 
Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, and Hegel. 
First-hand acquaintance with selected writings of these philosophers; reports, lec- 
tures, and class discussions. 



68 Haverford College 

7a. Ethics — Mr. Foss. 

A study of (I) conflicts of ethical values involved in contemporary life; (2) 
certain classical ethical devices for resolving those conflicts; (3) the role of the 
individual and of the group in the realization of ethical values. Case material 
drawn from contemporary situations and from literature will be widely used. 
Discussions, lectures, and papers. 

9a. Classics of Religious Literature — Mr. Steere. 

A study which will include such books as Augustine, Confessions; Bernard of 
Clairvaux, On Consideration; Meister Eckhart, Sermons; Little Flowers of St. 
Francis of Assisi; Thomas k Kempis, Imitation of Christ; Theologica Germanica; 
Theresa of Avila, Autobiography; Francis de Sales, Introduction to the Devout 
Life; Lancelot Andrewes, Preces Privatae; Pascal, Thoughts; Isaac Penington, 
Letters; John Wesley, Journal; John Henry Newman, Apologia; George Tyrrell, 
Autobiography. 

10b. Nineteenth Century Thinkers — Mr. Steere. 

Selected writings of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and Bergson. 

lib. Logic 

The principles of valid inference and their application to reasoning in every-day 
life and in the sciences; the syllogism and other types of formal reasoning, the 
nature of proof, the detection of fallacies; introduction to the logic of scientific 
method and to contemporary developments in symbolic logic. 

[Not offered in 1946^7.] 

12b. Philosophy of Science 

This course, designed for students with a general cultural interest as well as for 
those specializing in some one of the sciences, aims at an understanding of the 
nature of scientific knowledge, the logical methods of science, and the structure 
of scientific systems. The course will aid students of the special sciences in appre- 
ciating the manner in which the work of their own field expresses man's scientific 
interest and contributes to the scientific world-view. Basic concepts such as 
induction, causation, probability, measurement, explanation, prediction, and veri- 
fication are analyzed. 

[Not offered in 1946^7.] 

14b. Aesthetics — Mr. Foss. 

A study of the philosophical principles underlying the creative and apprecia- 
tive aspects of art. 

15a. History and Philosophy of Quakerism. 

The Quaker Movement is studied in its relation to other intellectual and 
religious movements of its time, particularly those found in English philosophy. 
The development of the dominant Quaker conceptions is traced to the present 
day and critically examined. The course is designed for non-Friends as well as for 
Friends. Not open to Freshmen. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought — Messrs. Steere, Foss, 
and Post. 

A seminar course based upon the writings of selected political philosophers from 
Plato to the present day. 

(Also called Government 17a, 18b.) 

21. Philosophical Seminar — Mr. Steere and Mr. Foss. 

Specialized work in some restricted field of philosophic or religious thought is 
undertaken, the precise subject depending upon the needs of the students and the 
general interests of the group. Primarily designed for Seniors majoring in philos- 
ophy and for graduates. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The College equipment for outdoor athletics includes: Walton 
Field for football and track and field sports, with a 440-yard oval 
and a 220-yard eight-lane straightway cinder track; the Class of 1888 
and Merion Fields for association (soccer) football, both of which 
are used for baseball in the spring; a skating pond; Cope Field for 
cricket; an athletic field, presented by the Class of 1916; a baseball 
field, presented by the Class of 1922, used also for soccer in the 
fall; and twelve tennis courts, five of which were presented by the 
Class of 1923. 

The Gymnasium floor, sixty by ninety feet, is used for basketball 
and intramural sports. Adjoining the main floor are offices for the 
instructors, the administration of physical examinations, and for 
special student conferences. Adjoining the main hall is a large and 
comfortable lounging room. The basement contains dressing rooms, 
a number of well-ventilated lockers, shower baths, a pool, a wrestling 
room, and storage room for athletic equipment. Through the courtesy 
of the Merion Cricket Club and the Merion Golf Club, facilities for 
squash and golf are available. 

A thorough physical examination with a series of efficiency tests 
is given to each student upon entrance, and another at the end of 
Sophomore year. A Tuberculin Test is given to all Freshmen, fol- 
lowed by an X-ray if necessary, as part of this required examination. 
No student whose physical condition is unsatisfactory will be per- 
mitted to represent the College on any athletic team. 

Course 1 is required for Freshmen; Course 2, for Sophomores; 
Course 3, for Juniors. 

These courses are arranged in accordance with the plan for all- 
year physical training during Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
part-year physical training during Junior year. 

Work on varsity and junior varsity squads may be substituted for 
regular Physical Education requirements. 

1. Physical Education — Three hours. Messrs. Randall, Haddleton, A. Evans, 
DocHERTY, and Bramall. 

A course of elementary instruction in athletic games including football, soccer, 
basketball, tennis, golf, track, volley ball, handball, badminton; partly elective. 
Special corrective exercises during the second and third quarters. 

2. Physical Education — Three hours. Messrs. Randall, Haddleton, A. Evans, 
DocHERTY, and Bramall. 

A course of advanced instruction in athletic games with emphasis on intra- 
mural sports. 

69 



70 Haverford College 

3. Physical Education — Three hours. Messrs, Randall, Haddleton, A. Evans, 
DocHERTY, and Bramall. 

A course, almost entirely elective, involving participation in some organized and 
supervised athletic activity during two of the three athletic seasons of the 
college year. 

PHYSICS 

The introductory courses are Physics 1 and 2. The first of these 
covers elementary physics a little more thoroughly than a secondary 
school course, but the laboratory work is designed especially for 
those who do not expect to specialize in physics. Physics 2 is a 
basic course for advanced work in physics, chemistry, engineering, 
mathematics, or astronomy. It covers the work required in physics for 
admission to many medical schools. With special permission. Physics 
1 may be counted as the required prerequisite for admission to the 
more advanced courses. 

Students intending to specialize in physics, chemistry, or medicine 
should also elect Physics 3. 

Physics 1, 2, 3, and 13 are offered annually. Other courses are 
offered according to demand. 

Major Requirements 

Physics 2, 13 and four semester courses selected from advanced offerings in 
Physics. 

History of Physics (collateral reading) . 

Mathematics 3a, and five semester courses, subject to the approval of the major 
supervisor, to be selected from Chemistry, Engineering, Mathematics, or 
Astronomy. 

A comprehensive examination based primarily upon courses taken in the 
Physics Department. 

1. Introductory Physics — Four hours. Mr. Benham, 

An elementary course designed for students who have had no previous study of 
physics, especially for those who may have no intention of specializing in science. 
Its purpose is to acquaint students with the principles underlying common physical 
phenomena and to illustrate, by lecture table experiments, by the solution of 
problems and by simple laboratory experiments, how these principles apply to 
matters of everyday experience. This is a much less exacting course than 
Physics 2. Text: Black, An Introductory Course in College Pliysics. A fee of 
$7.50 per semester is charged. 

2. General Physics — Four hours. Mr. Sutton. 

Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light are studied with the 
help of problems and lecture demonstrations. A feature of this course is the labora- 
tory work, the chief aim of which is accuracy of observation and measurement. 
Text: Mendenhall, Eve, Keys, and Sutton, College Physics. Prerequisites, Trigo- 
nometry or Mathematics 1, and Entrance Physics or Physics 1. A fee of $7.50 
per semester is charged. 

3. Atomic Physics — Mr. SinroN. 

A large amount of reading supplementary to the lectures is required in the 
library of reference books. Experiments are performed by the class as a whole upon 
such subjects as: atomic and molecular dimensions, weight, and numbers; magni- 
tude of charge and ratio E-hM for electrolytic ions; e-^m for cathode rays; prop- 



Courses in Physics ' 71 

erties of gaseous ions; measurement of the electronic charge e by Millikan's 
oil-drop method; current and space charge in an electron tube; photo-electric 
effect; radiation and ionization potentials; X-ray spectra; rate of decay of thorium 
emanation, and of the active deposit from radon; counting the alpha particles 
from a specimen of polonium. Prerequisite, Physics 2. Laboratory fee, $7.50 
per semester. 

4b. Spectroscopy — Mr. SirrroN. 

Lectures, readings, and experiments on spectroscopy and atomic structure, giving 
emphasis upon the underlying theory and offering acquaintance with the labora- 
tory methods involved. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

5a. Transmission Systems — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures, class discussions, and occasional experiments on the theory and prac- 
tice of networks. The course covers reduction and transformation of complex 
impedance and resistance networks, resonance in electrical circuits, transmission 
lines, filters, coupled circuits, equalizers, and bridge circuits. Text: W. L. Everitt, 
Communication Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. Lab- 
oratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

7a. Electricity and Magnetism — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures and laboratory experiments in precision electrical measurements. This 
course treats such topics as Kirchhoff's laws. Gauss's theorem, magnetic circuits, 
potential, capacitance, inductance, alternating current, and the laws; of the elec- 
tro-magnetic field. Textbook: Page and Adams, Principles of Electricity. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2; Mathematics 3a should be taken previ- 
ously or concurrently. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

8b. Intermediate Radio Communication — Mr. Benham. 

Lecture and laboratory course in high frequency transmission and reception. 
Textbook: Terman, Radio Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathe- 
matics 2, and preferably Physics 7a. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

9a. Mechanics — Mr. Ufford. 

Analytical mechanics treating the statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles 
and rigid bodies. Lectures and problems on the application of calculus and vector 
methods to mechanical systems including a brief treatment of Lagrange's equations 
and the special theory of relativity. Text: Synge and Griffith, Principles of 
Mechanics. Prerequisites: Physics 2 and Mathematics 3a (or Mathematics 3a may 
be taken concurrently) . No fee. 

10b. Introduction to Mathematical Physics — Mr. Ufford. 

Lectures and problems on selected topics in mathematical physics, such as 
hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory, wave motion, theory of electric 
fields, etc. Textbook: Page, Introduction to Theoretical Physics. This course and 
Physics 9a are complementary courses affording one full year in theoretical physics, 
but a student may elect either half. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 3a 
(or Mathematics 3a may be taken concurrently) . No fee. 

11a. Optics and Photography — Mr. Sutton. 

A study of the principles of physical optics followed by a systematic study of 
the photographic process. Laboratory work includes both measurements in 
optics and photographic dark-room manipulations. 

Text: Mack and Martin, The Photographic Process. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or 2. 
Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

12b. Sound — Second semester. Mr. Benham or Mr. Pepinsky. 

A course of lectures, readings, and class experiments designed to familiarize the 
student with recent developments in acoustics. Study is given to the fundamentals 



72 Haverford College 

of sound wave propagation, modern electrical and mechanical acoustic systems, 
architectural acoustics, supersonics, speech and hearing, and the analysis of musical 
sound. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per 
semester. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 
13. Physics Seminar — MR. Sutton and Mr. Benham. 

Advanced students in physics or other fields of science and mathematics are 
encouraged to do individual work in special fields of investigation. Each student 
devotes the time equivalent to a full course in pursuing comprehensive reading 
and experimental work on some particular topic. Weekly meetings are held 
with the members of the Department to discuss the progress in each field of 
investigation, so that each student becomes familiar witli problems other than 
his own. In this course the accomplishment of scholarly work of a nature pre- 
liminary to research work is the basis for awarding credit toward a degree. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. 

By permission, one semester only may be elected. 
15a. Electronics — Mr. Benham. 

This course includes material introductory to electron theory, study and appli- 
cation of vacuum-tubes, and problems pertaming to design and analysis of typical 
circuits employing them. Laboratory experiments are designed to give the stu- 
dent experience in the handling of apparatus in which electronic tubes are used. 
Prerequisite, Physics 2. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

16b. Advanced Radio — Mr. Benham. 

This course takes up the design and operation of such apparatus as radio trans- 
mitters, receivers, cathode-ray oscilloscopes, frequency modulated systems, tele- 
vision and radar. Laboratory periods are intended to give the student experi- 
ence in analyzing radio equipment. Prerequisite, Physics 15a or 8b. Laboratory 
fee, $7.50 per semester. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The study of psychology has for its goal the understanding and 
prediction of human behavior. 

1. General Psychology — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A systematic survey of the basic facts and principles in the various fields of 
psychology. Three demonstration lectures and two hours laboratory per week. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 

2b. Advanced Psychology — Mr. Steere. 

A study of the nature and functioning of personality by an examination of 
personality in difficulties. Both the forms of abnormal behavior and the modern 
theories of psychotherapy will be studied. Lectures, class reports, and occasional 
trips to clinics. Elective for twelve Juniors and Seniors and only by consent of 
instructor. Prerequisite, Psychology 1. 

3. (a or b) Special Topics in Psychology — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A seminar for special work in restricted fields of psychology. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 1. Elective for sophomores and upperclassmen by consent of instruc- 
tor. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 

4. (a or b) Experimental Psychology — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A laboratory course designed to familiarize students with the methods and 
techniques of psychological research, and to enable qualified students to under- 
take investigations in which they are particularly interested. Prerequisite, Psy- 
chology 1. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

5. (a or b) Psychology of Personality — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A study of the problems of development and organization of personality. An 
analysis and discussion of the problems and techniques of personality adjust- 



Courses in Romance Languages 73 

ment in the home and in educational, occupational, social, civil, political and 
recreational phases of human life. Prerequisite, Psychology 1. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 per semester. 

Remedial Reading — Mr. Pepinsky. 

Designed to take care of students having difficulty with their rate and com- 
prehension in reading. Diagnostic measures are undertaken. Practice in the use 
of the Harvard Remedial Reading Films and Equated Transfer Readings. No 
credit. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

The introductory courses are primarily language courses de- 
signed to give a thorough knowledge of grammar and accuracy 
of pronunciation as a basis for reading, writing and conversation. 
The literature courses are devoted primarily to the history of 
the literature and to the intensive study of periods and authors. 
The courses in literature are open only to Juniors and Seniors 
and especially well qualified Sophomores. Exceptional oppor- 
tunities for developing oral facility in French and Spanish are 
afforded by residence in French House and Language House. 

Admission of all new students to all French and Spanish 
courses, except French I and Spanish 1, is contingent upon place- 
ment examinations administered by the Department prior to the 
opening of such courses, on a date to be announced. 

FRENCH 

Opportunity is given to students who complete French 1 or 
French 2 with distinction to advance rapidly into higher courses 
by passing a special examination in September on a prescribed 
program of vacation study and reading. 

Students who have chosen French as their major subject and 
who have at the end of their Sophomore year demonstrated 
marked proficiency and a natural aptitude for the French lan- 
guage may be permitted to spend their Junior year in France 
according to the "Delaware Foreign Study Plan" upon the recom- 
mendation of the Department of French and the College. Only 
those students will be recommended who have a high average in 
their college work and are considered well qualified to represent 
the College. 

Major Requirements 

Four full French courses, except French 1 or 2. 

Modern European History, 

Supporting courses selected from the Latin, German, Spanish, Italian, and 
English languages and literatures; History of Art; Philosophy — to be arranged 
in individual conference. 

A written and oral comprehensive examination on the language, literature, and 
history of France. 



74 Haverford College 

1. Elementary French* — Mr. Williamson. 

Grammar, oral practice and reading. 

2. Intermediate French* — Mr. Wylie. 

Grammar, oral practice, composition and reading. Prerequisite, French 1 or 
the equivalent of French 1 at entrance. 

3. Introduction to French Civilization — Mr. Wyue. 

Geographic, cultural, and historical background of French literature; lectures, 
giammar review, reading, discussion, written reports, and explication de textes. 

4. Advanced French Conversation and Composition — Mr. Williamson. 
Normal prerequisites are French 3 and a course in French literature, but exemp- 
tion from the latter may be granted to well qualified students interested primarily 
in the language. 

16a. French Literature tlirough the Sixteenth Century — Mr. Williamson. 
Lectures with collateral reading and reports on the history of early French 
literature. 

17b. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century — MR. Williamson. 

Reading, reports, and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

18b. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century — Mr. Williamson. 

Reading, reports, and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

19a. Romanticism and Realism — Mr. Wylie. 

Reading, reports, and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures from 1800 to 1860. 
[Not offered in 1946-47.] 

19b. Modern French Literature — Mr. Wylie. 

From Baudelaire to Aragon. 



[Not offered in 1946^7.] 



SPANISFI 



Major Requirements 

Four full Spanish courses, except Spanish 1 or 2. 

History of Spain and Spanish America, as a background for literature. 

Supporting courses selected from the Latin, French, Italian, and English 
languages and literatures; History of Art; Philosophy — to be arranged in indi- 
vidual conference. 

Written and oral comprehensive examinations. 

1. Elementary Spanishf — Mr. Asensio and Mrs. Asensio. 

Grammar, with written and oral exercises; reading; thorough drill in con- 
versation. 

2. Intermediate Spanish — Mr. Asensio. 

Review of grammar, with written and oral exercises; composition, reading, and 
conversation. 

3. Introduction to Hispanic Civilization — Mr. Asensio. 

Geographic, cultural, historical, and economic background of the Iberian 
Peninsula and Latin America, with emphasis on Hispanic contributions to 
civilization; lectures, reading, written and oral reports. 

* Normally these courses meet six hours per week, with corresponding reduction in outside 
preparation ; 3 hours credit. 

t These courses meet five hours per week, with corresponding reduction in outside preparation; 
3 hours credit. 



Courses in Sociology 75 

4. Advanced Spanish — Mr. Asensio. 

Training in idiomatic Spanish; conversation and composition; collateral reading. 

5. Introduction to Spanish Literature — MR. Asensio. 

A survey of Spanish literature from the beginnings to modern times: lectures; 
written and oral reports. 

7a. Introduction to Latin-American Literature — Mr. Asensio. 

A survey of Latin-American literature from the Colonial period to modem 
times: lectures; written and oral reports. 

8b. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age — Mr. Asensio. 

Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calder6n: lectures; written and 
oral reports. 

9a or 10b. Special Topics in Spanish Literature — Mr. Asensio. 

Reading and lectures; written and oral reports. This course may be repeated, 
with change of content, for full credit. 

ITALIAN 

1. Intermediate Italian* — Mr. Caselli and Mr. Comfort. 

This course is designed for students with war-time experience in Italy. Review 
of Italian grammar, conversation, reading. 

RUSSIAN 

1. Elementary Russian — Mr. Cooper (first semester) and Mr. Cherry (second 
semester) . 

Introduction to the language: reading, writing, grammatical analysis, con- 
versation. 

SOCIOLOGY 

The courses in Sociology are designed to prepare students for citi- 
zenship in a democracy. Most, if not all, of our problems are at 
bottom traceable to faulty relationships between people and between 
groups of people. Hence, sociology as the "science of human rela- 
tions" aims to throw light on the relationship of the individual to 
the group; of group to group; and of group to community. 

Sociology, furthermore, analyzes problems of social maladjustment, 
such as crime, poverty, and the breakdown of family life, which call 
for intelligent social action if community life is to be the matrix 
from which good citizenship is born. 

Major Retjuirements 

Six half-year courses in Sociology. 

Six other half-year courses or their equivalent, chosen from the following: 
Biology 7, Psychology 1, Psychology 2b, Government 3a, Economics 1, and Mathe- 
matics 13b, in consultation with the Major Supervisor. 

Additional selected readings covering a special field in Sociology. 

A four-hour comprehensive examination covering the field of Sociology and 
related courses. 

A three-hour examination, written or oral or both, covering a special field in 
Sociology chosen by the student. 

* This course meets six hours per week, with corresponding reduction in outside prepara- 
tion; 3 hours credit. 



76 Haverford College 

For graduate students majoring in Sociology. Mathematics 13b (Introduction 
to Statistics) and Mathematics 14a (Advanced Statistics) may be counted as 
courses in Sociology. 

la. An Introduction to Sociology — Mr. Reid. 

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of society. Its purpose is to 
study (1) those social forces and social processes whereby original nature is trans- 
formed into human nature, and (2) a description of the social organization man 
has evolved and the interaction between it and himself. 

2b. Criminology — Mr. Watson. 

Social origins of crime and criminals; costs to the community and society; appre- 
hension and rehabilitation of offenders; police organization; the courts in opera- 
tion; penology, including the probation and parole systems. Trips to penal 
institutions and the criminal courts will be made. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

[Not offered in 1946-47.] 
4b. Ethnic Relations — MR. Watson and Mr. Reto. 

A study of "racial" and cultural factors in American communities. Special 
attention will be paid to the Negro, the American-born Japanese, the American 
Indian, and other minority groups. The particular cultural contributions of 
various minority groups are explored, and methods of resolving conflicts between 
groups are examined. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

5a. Labor Relations — Mr. Watson. 

A study of basic labor problems, such as wages, hours, and unemployment, 
together with an examination of the efforts of management, unions and the 
Government to find solutions through collective bargaining and labor legisla- 
tion. Special emphasis is placed on methods of resolving industrial conflict. 
Prerequisite, Economics 1 and Sociology la. 
(Also called Economics 5a.) 

6b. Management and Industrial Relations — Mr. Watson. 

A study of business administration and organization and the philosophy of 
management, with special reference to the fields of personnel administration and 
industrial relations. The course surveys the movement for "scientific manage- 
ment." It includes an analysis of the nature, objects, and technique of labor 
management, employee representation, and union-management cooperation. Pre- 
requisite, Economics 1 and Sociology la. 

(Also called Economics 6b.) 

7a. Seminar in Social Science Research — Mr. Reto. 

The seminar aims to acquaint the student with the general methods of research 
in the social sciences and their interrelations. It lays a foundation for the prepara- 
tion of M.A. theses and longer term papers involving social science research 
techniques. 

Classes limited to men majoring in one of the social sciences. Prerequisite, 
one two-term course or two one-term courses in any of the social sciences. 

8b. Problems of the Modern Family — Mr. Watson. 

A seminar course on problems of the modern family and education for parent- 
hood. A discussion of husband-wife, parent-child, and family-community rela- 
tionships. The emphasis throughout is on factors making for normal family life 
and successful adjustment thereto. Restricted to a limited number of upper- 
dassmen or graduate students. Apply in advance. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

[Offered in the first semester in 1946-47.] 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
THE LIBRARY 

The Haverford College Library, located near the center of the 
campus, illustrates the steady growth of the College in facilities for 
study and research. The original building, constructed in 1860, now 
forms the north wing of the Library. To this first structure four 
successive additions have been made. The last two of these, a com- 
modious Stack and a Treasure Room, were dedicated in April, 1941. 
The Mary Newlin Smith Memorial Garden adjoins the south side of 
the Library building. 

The Haverford Library collection now contains about 169,000 
volumes. Over four hundred literary and scientific periodicals are 
taken. Library endowments provide six thousand dollars yearly for 
the purchase of books. The Library is also a depository of govern- 
ment publications. 

With the exception of certain rare books, all volumes in the Library 
are freely accessible to readers. Though designed especially for the 
use of officers and students of the College, the Library affords to others 
the privilege of consulting and, under certain restrictions, of with- 
drawing books. The Library is open on week days from 8:00 a.m. 
to 10:00 P.M., and on Sundays from 1:30 to 10:00 p.m. Special hours 
are arranged for vacation periods. 

The Gummere-Morley Memorial Reading Room, decorated and 
equipped by the Class of 1892, provides a special reading and brows- 
ing room for Haverford students. 

Rare books and special collections are kept in the Treasure Room, 
where both permanent and temporary exhibitions are held. The 
Treasure Room is open from 9 to 5 (Saturdays, 9 to 12) . 

Special Collections. The Quaker collection, containing both books 
and manuscripts, is probably the most complete in America. It forms 
a central repository for Friends' literature in this country, and makes 
Haverford a prime source for the study of the Society of Friends. 

The William H. Jenks collection of Friends' tracts, mostly of the 
seventeenth century, numbers about fifteen hundred separately 
bound titles. 

The Rufus M. Jones collection on Mysticism contains almost a 
thousand books and pamphlets from the fifteenth century to the 
present day. 

77 



78 Haverford College 

The Tobias collection of the writings of Rufus M. Jones is prac- 
tically complete. It consists of 168 separate volumes and 16 boxes 
of pamphlets and extracts. 

The Charles Roberts autograph collection contains more than 
20,000 items, embracing not only autograph letters of authors, states- 
men, scientists, ecclesiastics, monarchs, and others, but also several 
series of valuable papers on religious and political history. 

The Christopher Morley collection of autograph letters comprises 
about 200 letters and memoranda selected by Mr. Morley from his 
correspondence files. Over 100 authors are represented. 

The Harris collection of ancient and oriental manuscripts con- 
tains over sixty Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopian 
rolls and codices collected by J. Rendel Harris. 

Cooperative Services. Haverford maintains a cooperative arrange- 
ment with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore whereby the facilities of the 
libraries of all three colleges are open to the faculty and students of 
each of the colleges. 

The Philadelphia Bibliographical Center and Union Library 
Catalog, the largest cooperative catalog in America, enables users 
of the Haverford Library to locate books in over one hundred and 
fifty libraries of the Philadelphia region. The Haverford Library is 
also a member of TJie Philadelphia Metropolitan Library Council. 

The Library Associates is an organization of graduates and friends 
of the College, devoted to increasing the usefulness of the Library. 
It serves to bring the facilities of the Library to a wider notice and 
to make them available to the whole Haverford community; to 
encourage the making of gifts to the Library; and to aid in the use 
of the Library for exhibition purposes. Enquiries should be ad- 
dressed to The Librarian, Haverford College. 

ART COLLECTION 
The Haverford Art Collection, including paintings and drawings 
by Pintorrichio, Whistler, Inness, Sargent, and Turner, is displayed 
in the Library. 

LECTURES 

The Haverford Librar)' Lectures and The Shipley Lectures, both 
endowed lectureships, provide annual speakers. The endowment for 
the former, a gift from the estate of Mary Farnum Brown, is avail 
able "for an annual course or series of lectures before the Senior Class 
of the College, and other students, on the Bible, its history and litera 
ture, and as a way may open for it, upon its doctrine and its teaching." 



Lectures, Etc. 79 

The fund for the latter was presented by Samuel R. Shipley, in mem- 
ory of his father, Thomas Shipley. The income from the Shipley 
fund is used "for lectures on English literature." 

Other lectures sponsored by departments in the College, especially 
that of Government, are offered at various times throughout the 
year. Most of these are open to the public. 

THE BUCKY FOUNDATION 

The Bucky Foundation, which has as its goal the promotion of a 
spiritually grounded political and economic order, and the training 
of responsible citizens for such an order, maintains its office in the 
Haverford Union. It has sponsored the Constructive Citizenship 
program, in cooperation with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore Colleges, 
which has provided training in the U. S. Employment Service for 
students of Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Swarthmore. 

THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The Morris Infirmary, presented by John T. Morris, '67, contains 
ten beds, a surgical room, an isolation ward for contagious diseases, 
its own kitchen, and accommodations for a physician and a nurse. 
Every provision has been made for medical and surgical treatment 
of all cases among students during the college year. The danger of 
infection through illness in the college dormitories is thus minimized. 

No charge is made for dispensary treatments, for the services of 
the college physician and the nurse, or for residence in the infirmary 
not exceeding one week in each case of illness. Any additional medi- 
cal or surgical service, including special examinations which cannot 
be made in the Infirmary, will be at the expense of the student. 
For residence in the Infirmary beyond the limit of one week the 
charge is $5 a day. 

Dr. Herbert W. Taylor is the physician in charge. Miss Mabel S. 
Beard is the resident nurse. 

HEALTH PROGRAM 

Under the Health Program at Haverford College the following 
services are available without additional charge: 

Physical examination on entrance. 

Unlimited ambulatory dispensary care at specified hours, with 
emergency dispensary care at any time by the College Physician and 
the College Nurse. 

Infirmary care at no extra cost for a period not to exceed 7 days 
in any single college year. After 7 days a charge of $5 per day will 



80 Haverford College 

be made. This charge will include the continued service of the 
College Physician and the College Nurse. 

Routine laboratory examinations. 

Ordinary X-ray photos necessary for diagnosis in connection with 
injuries. This item does not include X-ray examination for sub- 
acute conditions, such as those of the sinuses, gastro-intestinal tract, 
the lungs, etc. 

Minor surgical treatment as indicated for acute infection, simple 
fractures, dislocations, etc. 

The Health Service does not cover the routine X-ray chest exam- 
ination required of all entering students, but the College is normally 
able to arrange to have this done at a minimum cost on one day 
each fall. If the student is not able to take advantage of this arrange- 
ment, it is his responsibility to supply the College before Christmas 
vacation with a satisfactory reading of chest X-rays. 

The Health Service does not cover diagnostic examination by 
outside specialists. The College will assist in making arrangements 
for such examination, including optical and dental work, surgery, 
special nursing, etc.; but the cost is the responsibility of the student. 
Hospitalization elsewhere than in the Infirmary, or medical care 
by others than by the College Physician, is also excluded from the 
benefits of the Health Service. 

THE CAMPUS CLUB 

A group of alumni and friends of the College, who are interested 
in preserving and improving the natural beauty of the campus, is 
organized as The Campus Club. The planning is done by an execu- 
tive committee which meets biannually for the purpose of laying out 
new projects. The Arboretum and the Woolman Walk were devel- 
oped and are maintained by The Campus Club. 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 
The College publishes annually the Haverford College Catalog, 
the President's Report, the Treasurer's Report, the Report of the 
Librarian, publications of the Faculty, and the College Directory. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships are of two kinds: competitive, and those awarded 
upon merit and individual need. No one scholarship is given for 
more than one year. 

No scholarship will be given to a student who has a failure against 
him at the time of application. 



Scholarships 81 

No scholarship will be given to a student whose college bill has 
not been paid in full. 

All preliminary correspondence and applications for undergradu- 
ate scholarships for 1946-1947, together with supporting letters from 
parents or guardians, should be in the hands of the President before 
Tuesday, April 2, 1946. 

It is assumed that requests for scholarships will not be made by 
those whose expenses can be met by their parents or from other 
sources. In the majority of cases the College expects work from 
scholarship students amounting proportionately to the value of 
each scholarship. 

I. Corporation Scholarships. — Sixteen scholarships are awarded 
at the end of each term, without formal application, to the four stu- 
dents in each class having the highest average grades for the term 
then closing. In the case of the incoming Freshman Class the scholar- 
ships will be assigned immediately after the entrance examinations 
(see page 22) to those candidates entering by any plan of admission, 
who are judged to be best prepared to do the work of the College. 
Corporation scholarships are $100.00 for the summer term and 
$150.00 for the fall and spring terms, respectively. 

II. Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. — Three scholarships, nor- 
mally $250 each, usually awarded to members of the Senior and 
Junior classes. 

III. Richard T. Jones Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of 



IV. Edward Yarnall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

V. Thomas P. Cope Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of 



VI. Sarah Marshall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

VII. Mary M. Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship normally 
of the annual value of $200. 

VIII. Joseph E. Gillingham Scholarships. — Four scholarships nor- 
mally of the annual value of $200 each "for meritorious students." 

IX. Isaac Thome Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship, nor- 
mally of the annual value of $225, available for a student of Wilming- 
ton College or a member of Wilmington (Ohio) Yearly Meeting 
of Friends. 



82 Haverford College 

X. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships normally amount to $1500 an- 
nually. Usually these will be awarded in sums of $150 each, and 
in return for them certain academic duties may be required of the 
beneficiaries. 

XI. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships. — Eight scholarships normally 
of the annual value of $100 each. 



XII. Caspar Wistar Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship of $250 
is usually available, preferably for sons of parents engaged in Chris- 
tian service (including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions) or students desiring to prepare for similar service in America 
or other countries. 

XIII. Louis Jaquette Palmer Memorial Scholarship. — This schol- 
arship of $200 is awarded on application, preferably to a member of 
the Freshman Class who, in the opinion of a committee representing 
the donors and the President of the College, shall give evidence of 
possessing the qualities of leadership and constructive interest in 
student and community welfare which his friends observed in Louis 
Jaquette Palmer of the Class of 1894. 

XIV. /. Kennedy Moorhouse Memorial Scholarship, $300. — 
Intended for the member of the Freshman Class who shall appear 
best fitted to uphold at Haverford the standard of character and 
conduct typified by the late J. Kennedy Moorhouse of the Class of 
1900 — "a man modest, loyal, courageous, reverent without sancti- 
mony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in clean and 
joyous living." 

XV. Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVI. Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarships. — Two or 
more scholarships of the annual value of $250, preference to be given 
to "a native of New York or Connecticut and who now resides in 
one of those states." 

XVII. Samuel E. Hilles Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVIII. Class of 1913 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $125. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1913 who may apply and who meet the usual require- 
ments of the College. 

XIX. Isaac Sharpless Scholarship Finid. — Founded in 1941. 
Scholarships open to graduates of secondary schools and undergrad- 



Scholarships 83 

uates of Haverford College. Awards based upon fulfilment by appli- 
cant of requirements used in selection of Rhodes Scholars to the 
University of Oxford. Awards granted from list submitted to Selec- 
tion Committee by the Director of Admissions, subject always to 
final approval by the President of the College; amount variable. 

XX. Class of 1917 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $150. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1917 who may apply and who meet the usual require- 
ments of the College. 

XXI. The Geoffrey Silver Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship 
in the sum of $500 will be available to a Public School graduate in 
this general area who may enter Haverford. 

XXII. Daniel B. Smith Fund for Scholarships. — Founded Octo- 
ber 6, 1943, by gift of $2500 from Anna Wharton Wood of Waltham, 
Massachusetts. This will be increased by a bequest of $2500 made 
by Miss Esther Morton Smith of Germantown, Philadelphia, who 
died March 18, 1942. 

"The income is to be used, in the discretion of the Faculty, as an 
annual scholarship for some young man needing financial aid in his 
College course." Preference is to be given to a descendant of their 
father, Benjamin R. Smith, if any such should apply. 

XXIII. Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund. — 
Founded November I, 1943, by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. 
Hilles, 1888, in memory of his mother, Sarah Tatum Hilles, "to pro- 
vide for such number of annual scholarships of $250 each as such 
income shall be sufficient to create"; to be awarded by the Managers 
upon "needy and deserving students, and to be known as 'Sarah 
Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships.* " 

XXIV. Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund. — Established 
February 2, 1944, by Mrs. Elihu Grant "to commemorate the service 
to Haverford College of Dr. Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938 a mem- 
ber of the College Faculty. The income from this fund is applied to 
scholarship assistance to students in Humanistic studies, primarily 
those specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental 
Subjects." In special circumstances the income may be utilized to 
assist those working for a postgraduate degree at Haverford College. 
Tv.o scholarships of $300 each are available. 

Most of the scholarships listed above are permanent founda- 
tions. In addition, the alumni in various districts support regional 
scholarships. 



84 Haverford College 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Clementine Cope Fellowship, of the annual value of $700, 
may be awarded by the Faculty to the best qualified applicant from 
the Senior Class. He is required to spend the succeeding year in 
study at some American or foreign university approved by the 
Faculty. Applications for the Clementine Cope Fellowship should 
be in the hands of the President of the College before March 1. 

Teaching Fellowships. — With the remaining funds from the 
Clementine Cope Foundation there may be appointed one or more 
graduates of Haverford College as Teaching Fellows, with or without 
specific duties at Haverford College; or a second Cope Fellow may 
be appointed with a stipend of $400 or $500, as the income of the 
Fund may permit. 

Graduate Fellowships. — For information regarding graduate fel- 
lowships, see page 37. 

PRIZES 

All material submitted in competition for prizes should be depos- 
ited with the Registrar under assumed names, with a sealed envelope 
containing the writer's real name, before May 1. 

All prizes awarded in books are marked with appropriate book- 
plates. As soon as possible after the award a list of standard books, 
from which selection is to be made, should be submitted for approval 
to the head of the department awarding the prize. Books selected 
from the approved list may then be ordered through the College 
Office or elsewhere. The College grants an average discount of 
ten per cent on prize books, and supplies the bookplates. 

Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory 

The Alumni Association, in the year 1875, established an annual 
prize of $50 for excellence in composition and oratory. 

John B. Garrett Prizes for Systematic Reading 
in Literature 

A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $25 will be given at the 
end of the Junior or Senior year to the two students who, besides 
creditably pursuing their regular course of study, shall have carried 
on the most profitable program of reading in a period or compre- 
hensive topic during at least two years of their college career. 

The administration of these prizes is in the hands of the Commit- 
tee on Fellowships and Prizes, with which the candidate shall register 



Prizes 85 

and which shall approve the subject chosen. The Committee will 
then recommend the candidate to the department or departments 
to which he should apply for counsel and guidance. An oral exam- 
ination will be arranged in the final year to determine the scope 
and quality of the reading. 

The winners will be determined by the Committee after consulta- 
tion with the departments concerned. Either or both of these prizes 
may be omitted if, in the judgment of the Committee, the work does 
not justify an award. 

The Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin and Mathematics 
These are two prizes worth $10 each. They will be awarded in 
books at the end of the Sophomore year to the students who have 
done the best work for the two years in Latin and Mathematics, 
respectively. 

The Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry 
The Class of 1898, on the twenty-fifth anniversary of their gradua- 
tion, established a prize in honor of Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor 
of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 1917. 

This prize amounts to $100 and may be awarded to a student who 
has attained a high degree of proficiency in Chemistry and who shows 
promise of contributing substantially to the advancement of the 
science. This prize may be awarded to a Junior, to a Senior, or to 
a graduate of Haverford College within three years after gradua- 
tion. It may be awarded more than once to the same student, or 
may be withheld. 

The Class of 1902 Prize in Latin 
The Class of 1902 offers a prize of $10 in books to the Freshman 
whose work in Latin, in recitation and examinations combined, shall 
be the most satisfactory to the professor in charge of the Department. 

The Department Prizes in Mathematics 
A first prize of $15 and a second prize of $10 are awarded on the 
basis of a three hour examination on selected topics in Freshman 
Mathematics. The examination is held on the first Monday after 
the Spring Recess, and is open to Freshmen only. 

The Elliston P. Morris Prize 
This prize is not awarded in 1946-47. 



86 Haverford College 

The Elizabeth P. Smith Prize 
A prize of $40 is offered annually to the undergraduate who pre- 
sents the best essay on international peace. 

No prize will be awarded unless a high standard of merit is at- 
tained. Essays should be deposited with the Registrar before May 1. 
The judges shall be appointed by the President of the College. 

For the 1946-47 competition the following subjects are offered: 

1. The Relationship between Recent Scientific Developments 
and International Peace. 

2. A Critical Evaluation of the Contributions of the United 
Nations Organization to International Peace. 

3. The Probability of Eliminating War, in view of War's Prev- 
alence in History. 

4. An American Peace Policy for the Far East. 

5. World Famine and World Peace. 

The presentation should be not merely a catalog of events but also 
an interpretation and estimate of them. Each essay should contain 
references, in the form of footnotes and bibliography, to the authori- 
ties consulted. 

Prizes in Philosophy and Biblical Literature 
A prize of $40 in books is offered each year to any student who, in 
the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most satisfactory 
amount of outside reading in Philosophy in connection with the 
courses in that Department. A second prize of $25 in books is also 
offered. 

A prize of $40 in books is offered each year to any student who, in 
the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most satisfactory 
amount of reading on the Bible and related subjects. A second prize 
of $25 in books is also offered. 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes 
A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $45 will be given at the 
end of the Senior year to the two students who, in the opinion of 
the judges appointed by the President of the College, show the 
most steady and marked improvement in scholarship during their 
college course. 



Prizes 87 

The Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes 
Two prizes of $15 and |10, respectively, are awarded for the 
best verse written by a Haverford undergraduate during the year. 
Typewritten manuscript, under an assumed name, should be de- 
posited with the Registrar not later than May 1. The judges shajl 
be appointed by the President of the College. 

The Founders Club Prize 
A prize of $25 is offered by the Founders Club to the Freshman 
who is judged to have shown the best attitude toward college activi- 
ties and scholastic work. 

The S. p. Lippincott Prize in History 

A prize of $100 is offered for competition in the Department of 
History under the following general provisions: 

First — The prize may be withheld in any year, if the conditions 
listed below are not met by any of the competitors to the satisfaction 
of a majority of the judges. 

Second — The prize shall not be awarded twice to the same student. 

Third — Competition is open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors 
who have taken or are taking work in the Department of History. 

Conditions 

In competition for this prize an essay of not less than 5,000 
words shall be submitted as evidence of scholarly ability in the col- 
lection and presentation of historical material, treating a subject 
selected from a list announced by the Department of History before 
November 15. The essay should contain references in footnotes to 
the authorities consulted and a bibliography of works cited. 

The essay shall be typewritten and deposited, under an assumed 
name, with the Registrar before May 1. 

For the 1946-47 competition the following subjects are offered: 

1. African Imperial Problems in British Diplomacy from 1882 
to 1906. 

2. The Policies of the French Government with regard to French 
Security against Aggression from 1919 to 1936. 

3. The Development of Political Parties in the United States 
from 1789 to 1801. 

4. The Relations between the United States and Mexico since 
1911. 



88 Haverford College 

The Newton Prize in English Literature 
The Newton Prize in English Literature ($50) may be awarded 
annually on the basis of Final Honors in English, provided that 
the work of the leading candidate, in the judgment of the English 
Department, merits this award. 

The William Ellis Scull Prize 
The William Ellis Scull Prize (|50) will be awarded annually to 
the upperclassman who shall have shown the "greatest achievement 
in voice and the articulation of the English language." 

The George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics 
In memory of Dr. George Peirce, 1903, a prize of $50 is offered 
annually to a student of Chemistry or Mathematics "who has shown 
marked proficiency in either or both of these studies and who intends 
to follow a profession which calls for such preparation. Preference 
is to be given to a student who has elected organic chemistry, and 
failing such a student, to one who has elected Mathematics or some 
branch of Chemistry other than organic. Should there be two stu- 
dents of equal promise, the one who is proficient in Greek shall be 
given preference." The prize is offered, however, exclusively for 
students who expect to engage in research, and it will not be awarded 
unless the candidate has this intention. / 



DEGREES, PRIZES, AND HONORS 
GRANTED IN 1945-1946 

DEGREES 
The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 

June 8, 1946. 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 

Morris Evans Leeds, 1888 

DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 
James Garrett Vail 

MASTERS OF ARTS 

Deborah Adams Douglas (A.B., Sweet Briar, 1943) 

Thesis: "A Survey of the Cooperative Movement in Germany and an 
• Account of the Fate of Consumers' Cooperatives Under the Nazi 
Regime." 
Carolyn Graham (B.A., H. Sophie Newcomb, 1944) 

Thesis: "The Fort Ontario Emergency Center." 
Barbara Stevens Grant (A.B., Colby, 1943) 

Thesis: "Settlement Activities: A Study of the Summer Camp Recreational 
Program of the Henry Street Settlement." 
Sarah Edith Hovey (A.B., Reed, 1944) 

Thesis: "UNRRA and the Displaced Person Problem in Germany." 
Claxjdine Blanche Pohl (A.B., Oberlin, 1944) 

Thesis: "The Role of the World Student Service Fund in World Student 
Relief." 
Bernice Knight Shorter (Mrs. Fred C.) (B.A., Colby, 1944) 
Thesis: "A Study of the Unitarian Service Committee." 
Frederick Oscar Wilhelm (B.A., Wesleyan, 1944) 

Thesis: "A Study of Some of the Methods Used in Overcoming Race Preju- 
dice Towards Americans of Japanese Ancestry." 
Anne Stiles Wylie (Mrs. Laurence W.) (B.S., Simmons, 1943) 

Thesis: "A Revision of the American Friends Service Committee Handbook 
for Relief Workers." 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 
George Anderson Bartholomew, 1945 Howard Burtt Kriebel, 1943 
Robert Haig Bedrossian, 1946 Roberto Pablo Payro, 1946 

Robert Herman Behrens, 1946 Hans Eberhard Petersen, 1946 

Israel Morris Dowbinstein, 1947 Richard Douglas Rivers, 1947 

Albert Hunter Ewell, Jr., 1947 Robert Pearson Roche, 1947 

William Leonard Hedges, 1944 Charles Caldwell Ryrie, 1946 

David Johnson, 1947 Lawrence D. Steefel, Jr., 1947 

Julius Katchen, 1947 George Bov^xer Tullidge Sturr, 1947 

George Mitsuyoshi Yamane, 1946 
89 



90 Haverford College 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 

As of February 2, 1946 

Herbert Macy Whitehead, 1947 Richard Bayly Winder, 1943 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
William Macy Harris, 1943 Walter Yoneo Kato, 1946 

Anson Baldwin Haughton, 1942 Alan Spencer Rogers, 1943 

CLEMENTINE COPE FELLOWSHIP FOR 1946-1947 
(For graduate study at another institution.) 

Hans Eberhard Petersen, 1946 

CORPORATION SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 1946-1947 
(Award Made on the Basis of Semesters Completed) 

1-8 Semesters 
William Hamilton Harris Bruce Marten Miller 

James Fowler Adams, Jr. William John McIlhenny 

Henry Edwin Vinsinger, Jr. 

5-6 Semesters 
John Turner Whitman William Richmond Clark 

Timothy Breed Atkeson Peter Herbert Deitsch 

5^ Semesters 
Stephen Raben Miller James Hancock Thorpe 

John Neil Boger Ellis Paul Singer 

1-2 Semesters 
Walter Harvey Cope William George Worman 

Entering Class 
George Cabell Carrington, Jr. William Hamer Warner 

PRIZES 

The Mathematics Department Prizes ($25 for Freshmen) 

First Prize ($15) — Stephen Raben Miller, 1949 

Second Prize ($10) —John Neil Boger, 1949 

The Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory ($50) 
Alexander Campbell Wilson, 1950 

The William Ellis Scull Prize ($50) 

for the upper classman who shall have shown the 

"greatest achievement in voice and the articulation of 

the English language." 

John Alexander Stone, 1948 

The Logan Pearsall Smith Prize ($50 in books) 

for that member of the Senior Class who, in the opinion of the 

Committee on Prizes, has the best personal library 

Richard Bayly Winder, 1943 



Honor Societies 91 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes ($95) for the two Seniors 

who have shown the most steady and marked improvement 

in scholarship during the college course 

First Prize ($50) — Richard Bayly Winder, 1943 

Second Prize ($45) — Anson Baldwin Haughton, 1942 



The Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes 

for the best verse written by a Haverford undergraduate 

during the year 

First Prize ($15) — Henry George Rickerman, 1949 

Second Prize ($10) — Evan Gordon Newton Jones, 1949 

The Founders Club Prize ($25) for the Freshman who has 

shown the best attitude toward college activities and scholastic work 

Richard Arden Couch, 1949 

The Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry 

($100 from Endowment by the Class of 1898) 

for Juniors, Seniors or Graduates within three years of graduation 

who expect to engage in research 

Henry Edwin Vinsinger, Jr., 1945 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

The following students were elected to the 
PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 
William Leonard Hedges, 1944 Hans Eberhard Petersen, 1946 

William Huston Chartener/ 1946 Albert Hunter Ewell, Jr., 1947 

Roberto Pablo Payro, 1946 Julius Katchen, 1947 

The following students were elected to the 
FOUNDERS CLUB 
1944 
Walter Yoneo Kato, 1946 
1945 
Julius Katchen, 1947 Richard Douglas Rivers, 1947 

Lawrence D. Steefel, Jr., 1947 
1946 
James Fowler Adams, Jr., 1948 David Johnson, 1947 

Monroe Edward Alenick, 1948 Charles Long, II, 1947 

Timothy Breed Atkeson, 1948 Roberto Pablo Payro, 1946 

William Pierson Barker, II, 1948 Daniel Bard Thompson, 1948 

James Archibald Jacob, Jr., 1948 John Turner Whitman, 1948 

The following students were elected to 

TAU KAPPA ALPHA 
National Honorary Debating Fraternity 
1945 
Timothy Breed Atkeson, 1948 Julius Katchen, 1947 

William Pierson Barker, II, 1948 Robert Pearson Roche, 1947 

David Edward Thomas, 1948 
1946 
Ben Zion Leuchter, 1946 George Elson Ruff, Jr., 1949 



92 Haverford College 

HONORS 

FINAL HONORS 

Including Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors awarded upon gradu- 
ation, and by vote of the Faculty on recommendation of a department or group 
of related departments. Awarded only to students whose work has been more 
profound in a given field, or more extensive in scope than the minimum re- 
quired, or who have fulfilled all the requirements for Final Honors in their 
respective Major Departments. 

HIGH HONORS 

Roberto Pablo Payro, 1946 English 

Hans Eberhard Petersen, 1946 Greek 

HONORS 

Albert Hunter Ewell, Jr., 1947 Psychology 

William Macy Harris, 1943 Physics 

Julius Katchen, 1947 Philosophy 

Lawrence D. Steefel, Jr., 1947 History 

HONORABLE MENTION 

In single courses in the Freshman or Sophomore year representing a minimum 
of 75 hours of Honors work in addition to that required for the course named, 
plus a grade of 85 or better in the same course. 

John Neil Boger, 1949 Chemistry 2a, 3b 

Charles Daniel Brodhead, 1949 Biology 1 

Edward Echikson, 1949 Chemistry 2a, 3b 

John Norman Hauser, 1948 Economics 1 

Robert William Holmes, 1947 Psychology 1 

James Quinter Miller, 1949 Biology 1 

John Madison McCloud, 1948 French I 

Ellis Paul Singer, 1949 Chemistry 2a, 3b 

James Hancock Thorpe, 1949 Biology 1, Chemistry 2a, 3b 

David John Tolan, 1949 English 2b 

Theodore Craig Wright, 1949 English 2b 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Of 
HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

President 
William K. Hartzell, '28 
104 E. Montgomery Ave., Ardmore, Pa. 

Vice-Presidents 

Theodore Whittelsey, Jr., '28 

Haverford Gables, A-6, Haverford, Pa. 

Frank M. Eshleman, '00 
40 Broad St., Room 600, Boston, Mass. 

Howard J. Hogenauer, '24 
648 King St., Port Chester, N. Y. 

Executive Secretary 
Bennett S. Cooper, '18 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 

* Treasurer 
Walter C. Baker, '32 
Girard Trust Co., Phila., Pa. 



Haverford Club of Philadelphia 
1607 Moravian St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

President George W. Emlen, Jr., '08 

Vice-President Edward A. Edwards, '08 

Secretary Willard P. Tomlinson, '10 

Treasurer John C. Lober, '27 

New York Haverford Society 

President John E. Abbott, '29 

11 West 53rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Vice-President John R. Sargent, '33 

52 Wall St., New York 5, N. Y. 
Secretary R. Wilfred Kelsey, '33 

60 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer Herbert F. Taylor, '28 

7 Hanover Sq., New York, N. Y. 

93 



94 Haverford College 

Haverford Society of Maryland 

President Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr. '12 

1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Vice-President Joseph M. Beatty, Jr., '13 

308 Thornhill Rd., Baltimore 12, Md. 

Vice-President Gilbert Henry Moore, '17 

1125 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Secretary Mennis Lawson, '17 

HE. Lexington St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Treasurer Howard O. Buffington, Jr., '31 

1338 Crofton Rd., Baltimore 12, Md. 

Haverford Society of Washingtori 
President Hugh Borton, '26 

Burke, Virginia 

Vice-President H. Gifford Irion, '32 

809 So. Royal St., Alexandria, Va. 

Secretary-Treasurer Herbert W. Reisner, '31 

214 Prince St., Alexandria, Va. 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association of Haverford College 

President Gifford K. Wright, '93 

First National Bank Building, Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

Secretary Willard E. Mead, '26 

5800 Walnut St., Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Treasurer James M. Houston, '31 

1639 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

Haverford Society of New England 

President Frank M. Eshleman, '00 

40 Broad St., Room 600, Boston, Mass. 

Secretary-Treasurer Elliot W. Brown, '21 

401 Summer St., Boston, Mass. 

Haverford Society of Wilmington 
President John K. Garrigues, '14 

Delaware Trust Co., Wilmington, Del. 

Secretary Charles A. Robinson, '28 

Delaware Trust Co., Wilmington, Del. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Academic Council 19 

Administration, Officers of 18 

Admission — Advanced Standing 23 

Admission — Examinations 21 

Admission — Graduate Students 36 

Admission — Requirements for 20 

Alumni Associations 93 

American Literature 56 

Art Collection 78 

Astronomy 46-47 

Athletic Fields 69 

Autograph Collection, Charles Roberts 78 

Biblical Literature 47-48 

Biolog)' 48-49 

Bryn Mawr College, Cooperation with 30 

Bucky Foundation 79 

Calendar 4 

Campus Club 80 

Chemistry 49 

Clubs 44-45 

College Entrance Examination Board 21 

Committees — Board of Managers 14 

Committees — Faculty 19 

Conflicting Courses 29 

Corporation — Officers of 10 

Corporation — Standing Nominating Committee 10 

Courses of Instruction 46-76 

Curriculum 24 

Degrees Awarded in 1945-46 89 

Degrees — Bachelor's 36 

Degrees — Master's 36-37 

Delinquent Students 34-35 

Economics 51-53 

Engineering 54-56 

English Language and Literature 56-58 

Examinations for Admission 21 

Examinations for the Master's Degree 36 

Expenses 40-41 

Extra Courses 30 

Faculty — Members of 13 

Faculty — Standing Committees of 19 

Fees and Special Charges 41^2 

Fellowships — List of 84 

Fellowships — Awarded in 1945-46 90 

Free Electives 28 

French 73-74 

Geography and Geology 58 

German 58-59 

Government 59-61 

Grading of Students 34 

Graduate Students 36-37 

95 



96 Haverford College 

PAGE 

Greek 61 

Gymnasium , 69 

Health Program 79-80 

History 62 

History of Art 63 

History of Haverford College 8-1 1 

Honor Societies, Membership in 91 

Honor System 43-44 

Honors— Rules for 38-39 

Honors — Awarded in 1945-46 92 

Humanistic Studies 63 

Infirmary 79 

Italian 75 

Latin 63-64 

Lectures 78-79 

Library 77-78 

Limited Electives 25 

Loan Fund 41 

Major Concentration 27-28 

Managers, Board of 11 

Mathematics 64-65 

Meeting, Friends 8 

Monthly Payments of College Bills 41 

Music 66-€7 

Observatory 46 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 44 

Philosophy 67-68 

Physical Education 69 

Physics 70-72 

Placement Bureau 42 

Prizes — List of 84 

Prizes — Awarded in 1945-46 90 

Program of Courses 29 

Professions, Preparation for 30-34 

Psychology 72 

Publications, Official 80 

Remedial Reading 73 

Required Courses 25 

Romance Languages 73-75 

Rooms 40 

Russian 75 

Scholarships — List of 80-83 

Scholarships — Awarded in 1945-46 90 

Sociology 75_76 

Societies and Organizations 44-45 

Spanish 74 

Student Government 43-44 

Student Publications 45 

Swarthmore College, Cooperation with 30 

Tuition 40-41 

Veterans, Admission of 21 



I 




Biology and Phyilcs) 
IT. Cricket Pavllloa 

18. Power House 

19. Walter E. Smith Grand Stand 

20. Farm Buildings 

21. Government Houie 

22. .Merlon HaU 

23. IHerlon Annex 

24. Btrawbrldge Gateway 

29. Edward B. Conklin Memorial 
Gateway 

26. CIa» of 1006 Gateway 

27. Class of 1912 Gateway 

28. George Smith Borrt Gateway 

29. HllleB Laburatory of Applied 
Bcleaca (EnsinMrlnc) 



HaU (Arcbeolosy, 113. Mr. Sargent 



80. Class of 1005 Gateway 

101. Messrs. F. C. Erans. Foss. 
Hemdon, and Palmer 

102. Language House. Mr. and Mrs. 
Asenslo 

103. Messrs. Benham, J. A. Kelly, 
and Teaf 

104. Mr. Wllllamaon 

105. Mr. Lunt 

106. Mr. Rluenhouse 

107. Mr. Peplnsky 

108. Government House. Mr. Wylla 



110. Mr. WTilte and Mr. Caselll 

111. Mr. Jt. M. Jones 

112. .Mr. Macintosh 



114. Mr. H. Comfort 

115. Mr. Lockwood 

116. Mr. Hoag 

117. Presldent-Emerltos CoiEfort 

118. Mr. Reld 

119. Mr. Snyder 

120. Messrs. Cadbury and Green 
i21. Mr. Sutton 

122. Mr Walson 

123. Mr. Wilson 

125. Mr. Flight 

126. Mr. Jleldnim 

127. Mr. Sleere 
129. Mr. Oakley 
130.S«Unce House 



t ? 



Haverford College 
Bulletin 




REPORT OF 
TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER 

OF 

THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

FOR YEAR ENDING EIGHTH MONTH 31, 1946 

I H 4 -> '"" i ; -t vp 



VOLUME XLV 



NUMBER FOUR 



Fet 



ruary 



1947 



Issued Octooer, ^N^ovemter, Decemoer and 
February oy Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 



£ntered as second-class matter Novemter 2, 1944 at the Post 
Office of Haverford, Pa., under tke act of August 24, 1912. 



Haverford College 
Bulletin 




REPORT OF 
TREASURER AND COMPTROLLER 

OF 

THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

FOR YEAR ENDING EIGHTH MONTH 31, 1946 



VOLUME XLV 



NUMBER FOUR 



Feb 



ruary 



1947 



COLLEGE OFFSET PRESS 
I4S-180 N. SIXTH ST.. PHILADELPHIA 6. PA. 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
Officers 

"dr. S. EMLEN stokes. President Moorestown. N. J. 

GILBERT F. WHITE, President 

of the College Haverford, Pa.l 

ARCHIBALD MACINTOSH Haverford , Pa .2 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 3 

JOHN F, GUMMERE, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox St.. Phila. 44 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 

Term Expires 1947 

STANLEY R. YARNALL 5337 Knox St . , Riila. 44 

IRVIN C. FOLEY 6012 Chew St . , Hiila. 38 

ARTHUR J. PHILLIPS 274 S- Felton St., Phila. 39 

Term Expires 1948 

HENRY C. EVANS 635 Manataima Ave. , Phila. , 28 

WILMOT R. JONES Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

RICHARD M. SUTTW 785 College Ave. . Haverford. Pa. 

Term Expires 1949 

WILLIAM M. MAIER Bailey Building, Phila. 7, Penna. 

I. THOMAS STEERE 375 W. Lancaster Ave. , Haverford, Pa. 

PAUL W. BROWN Downingtown, Penna. 



(1) APPOINTED SEPTEMBER 1, 1946 

(2) ACTING PRESIDENT FOR THE YEAR 1945 - 1946 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 
Ex'officio as Officers of Corporation 

DR. S. EMLEN STOKES, President Moorestown, N. J. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St.. Phila. 3 

JOHN F, GUMMERE, Secretary ."fl . School Lane and Fox St., Phila- 44 

Term Expires 1947 

J . STOGDELL STOKES Summerdale . Phila . , 24 

M. ALBERT LINTON 4601 Market St.. Phila. 39 

FR.\NCIS R. TAYLOR 910 Girard Trust Bldg.. Phila. 2 

EDWARD WOOLMAN Haverford. Pa. 

THOMAS W, ELKINTON 121 S. 3rd St.. Phila. 6 

MORRIS E. LEEDS 4901 Stenton Ave.. Phila.. 44 

HENRY C. EVANS 6 35 Manatawna Ave .. Phila . 28 

WILLIAM M. MAIER.o Bailey Building. Phila. 7 

Term Expires 1948 

CHARLES J. RHOADS Ithan Rd . . Bryn Mawr . Pa. 

EDWARD W. EVANS 304 Arch St.. Phila.. 6 

WILLIAM A. BATTEY Liberty Trust Bldg.. Phila. 7 

DP. FREDERIC C. SHARPLESS Rosiemont. Pa. 

ALFRED BUSSELLE 220 E. 36th St.. New York. N. Y. 

JOHN A. SILVER Tabor Rd. and E. Adams Ave. Phila. 20 

WILLIAM B. BELL Rockefeller Plaza. New York. N. Y. 

WILMOT R. JONES Alapocas Drive, Wilmington. Del. 

Term Expires 1 949 

FREDERIC H. STRAWgRIDGE 801 Market St . . Phila. 7 

JONATHAN M. STEERE 1318 Girard Trust Bldg.. Phila. 2 

L. HOLLINGSWORTH WOOD 103 Park Ave. . New York. N. Y. 

STANLEY R. YARNALL 5337 Knox St.. Phila. 44 

WILLIAM W. COMFORT Haverford, Pa. 

DR. HENRY M. THOMAS, JR 314 Overhill Rd . . Bait imore 10 , Md . 

ALEXANDER C. WOOD, JR 325 Chestnut St.. Phila. 6 

HAROLD EVANS 1000 Provident Trust Bldg.. Phila. 3 



Alumni Representatives 

J. COLVIN WRIGHT, Term Expires i 947. .116 E. Penn St.. Bedford. Pa. 
PAUL V. R. MILLER. Term Expires 1948. 1700 Girard Trust Bldg. . Phila. 2 
CHARLES S.RISTINE, TerwExpires 1948 .Fidelity-Phila .Trust Bldg, .Phila. 9 
W. NELSON WEST, III, Term Expires 2949. .1411 Walnut St., Phila. 2 

Faculty Representatives 

Term Expires 1947 Term Expires 1948 

RICHARD M. SUTTON HOWARD M. TEAF , JR. 

Alternates . 1946-47: CLETUS O. OAKLEY and RALPH M. SARGENT 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

S. EMLEN STOKES W. NELSON WEST , III 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers of 
THE Corporation of Haverford College 

The Chairman of the Board is an 
ex -of fie io member of all Committees . 

Execut ive Committee 

S. EMLEN STOKES, Chairman THOMAS W. ELKINTON 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD PAUL V. R. MILLER^ 

JONATHAN M. STEERE EDWARD W. EVANS 

ALEXANDER C. WOOD JR.^ MORRIS E. LEEDS 

FREDERIC C. SHARPLESS W. NELSON WEST III 

WILMOT R. JONES 2 JOHN F. GUMMERE^ 

CHARLES S. RISTINE2 J. STOGDELL ST0KES2 

Commit tee on Finance and Investments 

JONATHAN M. STEERE, Chairman M. ALBERT LINTON 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD WILLIAM B. BELL^ 

ALEXANDER C. WOOD JR. MORRIS E, LEEDS 2 

WILLIAM M. MAIER2 

Committee on College Property and Farm 
HENRY C. EVANS, Chairman EDWARD W. WOOLMAN 

FREDERIC H. STRAWBRIDGE ALFRED BUSSELLEI 

THOMAS W. ELKINTON WILLIAM M. MAIER* 

WILLIAM A. BATTEY OWEN B, RHOADSl 

JOHN A. SILVER FREDERIC H. STRAWBRIDGE2 PAUL V. I, MILLER2 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 
HENRY M. THOMAS, Chairman 

L. HOLLINGSWORTH WOODI STANLEY R. YARNALL 

WILLIAM WISTAR COMFORT FRANCIS R. TAYLOR 

HAROLD EVANS2 M. ALBERT LINTON 

Library Committee 

ALEXANDER C. WOOD^ , Chairman 

WILLIAM WISTAR COMFORT L. HOLLINGSWORTH WOOD 

HAROLD EVANS2 WILMOT R, JONES 

Counse 1 
MACCOY, BRITTAIN, EVANS', AND LEWIS 
1632 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



iTerm Ebcpired: Tenth Month 1946 
2Term Began: Tenth Month 1946 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



GILBERT F. WHITE 
S.B.. S.M., and Ph.D. University of Chicago 

ARCHIBALD MACINTOSH 

A.B., Haver ford College ; At. A., Columbia Univeraity 

Vice President 

GILBERT THOMAS HOAG 
A.B. , Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D.. Harvard Univeraity 

Dean 

ALDO CASELLI 

D.S.E. and C, University of Naples 

Comptroller 

DEAN PUTNAM LOCKWOOD 
A.B., A.M., and Ph.D.. Harvard Univeraity 
Librarian 

S EATON SCHROEDER 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Superintendent 

HERBERT WILLIAM TAYLCK 
A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Physician in Qiarge 

LOUIS CRAIG GREEN* 

A.B.. A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

THOMAS EDWARD DRAKE 

A.B. , StanfordUniversity; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D. , Yale Univ . 

Qirator of the Quaker Collection 

BENNETT SMEDLEY COOPER 

B.S., Haverford College^ 

Alumni Secretary and Assistant to the President 

MRS. ETHEL ELIZABETH BEATTY 
Dietician 

AMY LYDIA POST 

A.B., Earlham College 

Assistant Librarian 

MABEL SYLVIA BEARD 
R.N. , Lankenau Hospital 
Resident Nurse 

ALICE LOUELLA BERRY 
Secretary to the President 

GERTRUDE MANN WONSON 
B.S., Simmons College 

Adinissions Office 



♦ Absent on leave, 1945-46. 

6 



SUMMARY OF THE ACCOUNTS OF 
THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, TREASURER 
ALDO CASELU, COMPTROLLER 

For the Year Ending Eighth Month 31, 1946 



RECEIPTS 

Income from Funds for General Purposes 

General Endowment Fund 4,333.57 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 1,684.34 

John M. Whitall Fund 473.88 

David Scull Fund 1,995.58 

Edward L. Scull Fund 506.14 

Wistar Morris Memorial Fund 229.11 

Israel Franklin Whitall Fund 480.20 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 57,960.20 

John Farnum Brown Fund 12,287.93 

Ellen Wain Fund 495.13 

Clementine Cope Endowment Fund 957.28 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 136.79 

Joseph E. Gillingham Fund 1,888.16 

Henry Norris Fund 262.15 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 423.41 

James R. Magee Fund 1,996.12 

Albert K. SmUey Fund 66.81 

Hlnchman Astronomical Fund 1,759.93 

W. D. and E. M. L. Scull Fund 7,774.51 

Albin Garrett Memorial Fund 1,192.32 

Arnold Chase Scattergood Memorial Fund 1,085.90 

Francis B. Gummere Memorial Fund 5,592.57 

Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund '. . 9,741.65 

General Education Board Fund 5,615.17 

William Penn Foundation 4,545.84 

Walter Carrol Brlnton Memorial Fund 629.13 

Corporation Fund 3,563.46 

Elizabeth J. Shortridge Fund 445.38 

Howard Comfort Memorial Fund 223.90 

Emma Ridgway Comly Fund 2,226.33 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund 4,751.38 

Albert L. Baily Fund 222.69 

Elizabeth B. Wistar Warner Fund 220.46 

T. Allen HUles Bequest 12,504.58 

Leonard L. Gjeif & Roger L. Greif Fund 44.54 

Edward M. Wistar Fund 111.34 

Triangle Society Endowment Fund . 61.15 

Morris E. Leeds Fund 1,822.50 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund 91.49 

Forward $150,403.02 



Forward $150,403.02 

Income from Fund for T. Wistar Brown 

Graduate School ^ 

Moses Brown Fund 15,924.74 

Income from Funds for Morris Infirmary 

Infirmary Endowment Fund 429.94 

John W. Pinkham Fund 225.34 655.28 

Income from Fund for Haverford Union 



Haverford Union Fund 



83.68 



Income from Funds for Scholarships 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 234.17 

Edward Yarnall Fund : 270.31 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 882.62 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund 225.19 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 312.37 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 352.73 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 1,017.50 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 381.83 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 131.44 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 229.63 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund 222.69 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund 224.72 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund 846.51 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 223.46 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 133.61 

Class oi 1917 Scholarship Fund 171.61 

Daniel B. Smith Fund 231.11 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund 3,491.42 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 654.61 

Christian Febiger Scholarship Fund 61.63 10,299.16 

Income from Funds for Library 

Alumni Library Fund 776.52 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 3,019.51 

William H. Jenks Library Fund 222.69 

Mary Wistar Brown WUliams Library Fund 904.41 

Anna Yarnall Fund 7,661.68 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund 28.30 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial Fund 44.64 

Class of 1888 Library Fund 290.02 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 55.83 13,003.60 

Income from Funds for Old Style Pensions 

President Sharpless Fund 1,836.60 

William P. Henszey Fund 1,637.14 

Jacob P. Jones Benefit Fund 3,033.63 

Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund 145.74 

Haverford College Pension Plan 4,990.03 11.643.14 

Forward $202,012.62 



Forward $202,012.62 

Income from Funds for Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund 233.73 

Elliston P. Morris Fund 50.18 

John B. Garrett Reading Prize Fund 101.20 

Special Endowment Fund 410.95 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund 102.30 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund 77,68 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund 113.43 

Francis Stokes Fund 228.05 

George Peirce Prize Fund 106.97 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund 95.98 

Newton Prize Fund 62.25 

Edward B. Conklin Athletic Fund 106.89 

Arboretum Fund 204.33 

WiUiam Ellis Scull Prize Fund 89.08 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund 44.54 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund 171.00 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 132.59 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 50.53 

William T. Elkinton Fund 115.16 

Tilney Memorial Fund , 231.11 

Class of 1902 Latin Prize Fund 6.61 2,734.56 

Income from the Funds for the College 204,747,18 

Income from Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 1,139.48 

Total from All Funds 205,886.66 

Income from College Sources 

Tuition (201 Students at beginning of year 

280 Students at beginning of 2nd term) 

Cash 80,471.85 

From Scholarship Funds 11,505.05 

From Donations 4,196.54 96,173.44 

Board 58,178.67 

Rooms 28,921.60 

Re-examination fees 195.00 

Room and Board from Non- Students: 

Rents 5,440.00 

Rooms: 

Guests and Alumni and Faculty . . 1,509.75 

Employees 2,178.00 

Immigration & Naturalization 

Service 1,869.55 

American Red Cross 438.00 5,995.30 

Meals: 

Guests and Faculty 1,490.05 

Day Students. 2,754.25 

Employees 5,502.00 

Immigration & Naturalization 

Services 5,655.50 15,401.80 26,837.10 

Forward 210,305,81 $205,886.66 



Forward $205,886.66 

Income from College Sources (continued) 

Forward 210,305.81 

Miscellaneous Collections: 

Fees & Fines 1,116.93 

Book Store . 116.95 

Transcripts '. . 531,35 

Sale of Materials 857.57 

Use of Land 816.25 

Admissions to Gym and use of Tennis Courts . 157.85 

College Entrance Examination 42.00 

Facilities used by Immigration & 

Naturalization Service 784.34 4.423.24 

214,729.05 

Donations applied: 

For Care of Cope Field 50.00 

For Government House 500.00 

For General Purposes 35.00 215,314.05 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Further Receipts from Government 825.00 

Donations other than for Funds - General 

For Concert 100.00 

For Class of 1922 Athletic Field 80.00 

For Field House 29.50 

For Books - Greek books 100.00 

Library Associates 578.00 

Minor Library Donations 28.39 

Matzkie Royalties 34.68 

Oriental Books 100.00 841.07 

For Scholarships 1,820.00 

For Salaries from Alumni Association 3,139.93 

For Campus Club 263.34 

For Care of Cope Cricket Field 50.00 

For Physics Laboratory 10.72 

For Psychological Laboratory 10.00 20.72 

For Radio Club - Interest added 63.12 

For Rain Damage 8.50 

For Travel Expense » 4.50 

For Closing Account 51.34 

Class of 1934 Gift 85.00 

Unspecified Purpose 35.00 

For Alterations # 1 College Lane 370.00 

6,962.02 

Alumni Sustaining Fund Donations 30,286.20 37,248.22 

Donations for Additions to Funds 

Triangle Society Endowment Fund 

Proceeds of Policy on life of H. Conrad 
Atkinson '40 who was lost in the Pacific 
in 1942 500.00 

Forward 500.00 $459,273,93 



10 



Forward $459,273.93 

Donations for Additions to Funds (continued) 

Forward 500.00 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial 

Scholarship Fund - Donated 2,000.00 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund - Donated 425.00 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Donated 1,000.00 

Christian Febiger Scholarship Fund (New) 

Donated 8,000.00 

Cl^s of 1888 Library Fund - Donated 200.00 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 

Donated 1,000.00 

Tilney Memorial Fund - Donated 3,000.00 16,125.00 

Additions to Funds -- Income Transferred 
to Principal 

Moses Brown Fund - Income capitalized 1,592.47 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 

Income capitalized 31.83 

George Peirce Prize Fund - Income capitalized . , 106.97 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Fimd - 

Income capitalized 132.59 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - 

Income capitalized 25,53 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund - 

Income capitalized 42.69 1,932.08 

Total Additions to Funds 18,057.08 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

From Sale of Books - Supplementary income 

Elihu Grant Memorial Fund 80.00 

Interest on Current Funds Invested 2,220.55 

Library Replacement Account - Replacements 347.57 

Skating Pond Receipts 62.00 

Taxes Withheld 31,029.90 

Taxes Withheld - Pensions 2,875.20 

Advances to be refunded - Received on Account 37.50 

In and Out Receipts 5,439.82 

Work in Progress - Received 4,350.58 

Book Store - Collected from Students 3,409.03 

Store Account - Receipts 6,770.68 

Student Store Old Account - Received on Account 44,79 

Loan paid off 300,00 

Students Affairs Account for Commons Room 1,682.31 

Book Store on Campus - Collected from Students 1,089,61 

Accounts Receivable from Students - Collected 195,517.38 

Accounts Receivable from Students - Special - 

Deposits Collected 10,057.33 

Accounts Receivable from Employees - Collected 37,614.83 

Accounts Receivable from Government for Tuition - 

Collected 30,594.08 

Student Loan Fund - Repayment on Account 5,000.00 

Merion Title & Trust Co. - Final Liquidating Dividend 607.12 339,130.28 

Forward $816,461.29 



11 



Forward $816,461.29 

Items Relating to Other Fiscal Years 

Advance Receipts for Following Year 2,930.07 

Room Rents paid for in advance ' 6,981.00 

Expenses for Following Years - Applied 11,251.77 

Insurance for Following Years - Applied 6,546,08 

Reserve for Language House Alterations - Applied 511.87 

Reserve for Kitchen Alterations - Applied 2,501.04 

Reserve for Merion Title & Trust Co. - Applied 7,230.23 37,952.06 

Fire Insurance Collected - Barclay Hall Fire * 

Building 24,714.75 

Contents 465.50 

For Students' Property 1,242.75 26,423.00 

Investments Realized 

Consolidated Investments Account 

Bonds - Government 27,429.62 

Municipal 20.00 

Industrial 7,343.93 

Public Utility 46,375.00 

Railroads 235,732,89 

Miscellaneous 8.500.00 325,401.44 

Preferred Stocks - 

Industrial 24,434.74 

Public Utility 74.612.89 99,047.63 

Common Stocks - 

Industrial 171,135.69 

Public Utility 4,004.62 

Miscellaneous 1.098.94 176,239.25 

Mortgages 141,315,64 

Real Estate - 

Sold 154,175.38 

Sundry Receipts 502.91 154,678.29 

Miscellaneous 4,934.35 901,616.60 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 13,960.85 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 

(First National Bank & Trust Co. of Minneapolis, Minn.) 

Entered short $2,086.75) 

Ellen W. Longstreth Agency a/c 621.50 

Ellen W. Longstreth - Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 512.32 

Anna Yarnall Agency a/c 1,395.44 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 18,107.64 

C. Wharton Stork Art Gift Fund - Sale of Rights 822.50 937.036.85 

Current Funds Invested - Realized 420,000.00 

Money Borrowed Temporarily 460.000.00 

Balances 9th Month 1, 1945 : 

In Treasurer s Account 176,679,03 

In President's Account 12.149.61 188.828.64 

$2,886,701.84 



12 



EXPENDITURES 

1945 - 1946 

Expenses of Running the College 

Administration 

Salaries 44,805.36 

Supplies and Postage 2,900.85 

Services 287.55 

Telegraph and Telephone 718.43 

Replacements and Repairs 6,00 

Additional Equipment 226.85 

Insurance 84.82 

Traveling 884.75 

Public Relations 3,418.06 

Printing 3,915.51 

Entertainment 2,226.31 59,474.49 

(14.452%) 

Educational Departments 

Salaries 179,954.83 

Supplies and Postage 4,170.44 

Services 2,476.52 

Telegraph & Telephone 1,195.72 

Additional Equipment 7.50 

Insurance 1,277.32 

Traveling 1,789.65 

Miscellaneous 585.84 191,457.82 

(46.525%) 

Maintenance and Operation 

Wages 52,931.05 

Supplies and Postage 3,299.00 

Services 3,683.92 

Water, Heat, Light & Power 20,701.07 

Telegraph and Telephone 483.00 

Replacements and Repairs 1,212.22 

Additional Equipment 231.20 

Taxes 2,608.65 

Insurance 4,303.66 

Auto Maintenance & Operation , . , 1,089.51 

Miscellaneous 1,799.61 92,342.89 / 

(22.440%) / 

Kitchen 

Wages 18,821.69 

Provisions 43,262.09 

Services 1,075.78 

Water, Heat, Light & Power 3,957.95 

Telegraph and Telephone 179.05 

Replacements & Repairs 747.87 

Taxes 18.00 

Insurance 172.78 

Traveling 5.00 68.240.21 411.515.41 

(16.583%) 

Forward $411,515.41 



13 



Forward $411,515.41 

Treasurer's and Secretary's Expenses 

Auditors 500.00 

Clerical Help and Rent (in part) 3,750.00 

Stationery & Printing 215.93 

Machine Servicing 19.19 

Financial Publications 116.00 

Notary Fees 12.75 

Secretary's Typewriting and Expenses 825.98 5,439.85 

Old Style Pensions 27,622.00 

Annuity 1,600.00 

Interest (net cost) 1,463.95 

Stork Art Gift - Shortage of income to meet interest charge . 941.77 

Fifth 1/6 cost of Language House - Alterations written off . . 511.87 

Fifth 1/6 cost of Kitchen Alterations applied 2,501.04 

Cost of Running the College 451,595.89 

Loss written off in former deposit a/c in 

Merion Title and Trust Co. less recoveries \ 7,230.23 

Immigration and Naturalization Service 

Expense of Services 825.00 

Accelerated Summer Term - 1945 (completed) 

Charge cancelled 22.50 

Remaining balance distributed to Faculty 2,095.56 2,118.06 

Expenditures from Income of Funds for 
Scholarships and Fellowships 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 2,594.00 

Moses Brown Fund 956.25 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 220.00 

Edward Yarnall Fund 225.00 

Isaiah V.Williamson Fund 600.00 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 275.00 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 350.00 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 87.00 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 240.00 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund . . , 375.00 
Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 800.00 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 200.00 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 125.00 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 150.00 

Daniel B. Smith Fund 150.00 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund . 3,707.80 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 450.00 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 

(3 -fellowships at Harvard) 1.800.00 13.305.05 

Expenditures from Income of Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research 

Scholarship Fund - Annuity 980.00 



Forward 14,285.05 $461,769.18 



14 



Forward 14,285.05 $461,769.18 

Expenditures from Income of Funds for Library 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund - Books 227.95 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 

Books - General & Christian 

Knowledge 2,952.82 

Lectures 24.00 2,976.82 

William H. Jenks Library Fund - Books 127.55 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund 

Books 1,366.29 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund - Books 39.60 

Edmund Morris Fergusson Jr. Memorial Fund 

Bodes 55.56 

Class of 1888 Library Fund - Books 746.75 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 156.67 5,697.19 

Expenditures from Income for Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund - Lecture 207.75 

EUiston P. Morris Fund - Books 22.63 

Special Endowment Fund - 

Religious Education Committee . . 200.00 

Friends Council on Education . . . 25.00 

Student Service of America 100.00 

Ommen School - Holland 50.00 375.00 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund - Prizes . . 95.00 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund - Prize 50.00 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund - Books . . . 8.67 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund - Prize 100.00 

Newton Prize Fund - Books 5.32 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund - Prize 50.00 

Paul D. L Maier Fund - Prize 10.00 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund .... 718.90 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - Prizes . . 25.00 
William T. Elkinton Fund - International 

Relations Club 90.40 1,758.67 21,740.91 

Spent from Donations 



For Music - from Gift of 

Carnegie Foundation 4,547.63 

For Art - from Gift of 

Carnegie Foundation 755.36 5,302.99 

For Concert 100.00 

For Books 480.13 

For Poetry Prize - Class of 1910 25.00 

For Scholarships applied 4,753.59 

For Salaries applied 3,139.93 

For Campus Club 41.10 

For Chemistry Laboratory Equipment 288.75 

For Electronic Equipment 478.47 

For Engineering Equipment 100.50 

For Kitchen Repairs 84.25 

For Microfilms 383.31 

For Haverford, Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr 

Programs 203.04 

For Alterations - #1 College Lane 370.00 

Forward 15,751.06 



$483,510.09 



15 



Forward $483,510.09 

Spent from Donations (continued) 

Forward 15,751.06 

For Physics Laboratory 10.72 

For Rain Damage repaired 8.50 

For New Lighting Equipment - Roberts Hall .... 136.45 

For Travel Expense 4.50 

To Close Overdrawn Account 51.34 

For Equipment - Comptroller's Office 

from Morris E. Leeds stock gift 829.45 

For Bonds bought for Class of 1934 Gift 92.50 

For Cope Cricket Field applied 50.00 

For Government House applied 500.00 

For General Purposes applied 35.00 17,469.52 

Spent from Triangle Society Gift 

For Lectures on Government 1,000.00 

Spent from Bucky Foundation Gift 

For Books 2.10 

Spent from Alumni Sustaining Fund 

For Expenses of Alumni Association and Campaign 6,273.99 24,745.61 

(Balance of $24,012.21 used for College 
Current Expenses) 



Miscellaneous Expenditures 

Library Replacements Accounts - Cost of Books 28.26 

Skating Pond Expenses 198.53 

Taxes Withheld paid to Government 31,816.20 

Taxes Withheld from Pensions paid to Government 2,893.50 

In and Out - Expenditures 1,327.10 

Work in Progress - spent 4,350.58 

Book Store Expenditures 3,409.03 

Store Account Costs 6,472.00 

Surplus Property of Government bought 1,643.74 

Book Store on Campus - costs 1,302.82 

Accounts Receivable from Students - charges 193,750.19 

Accounts Receivable from Students - Special - charges .... 10,349.52 

Accounts Receivable from Employees - charges 36,867.97 

Accounts Receivable from Government - charges 36,142.99 

Refund to Student drafted 1941-42 150.00 

Items Relating to Other Fiscal Years 

Advance Receipts for Following Year Applied 3,525.93 

Expenses for Following Year 16,794.07 

Insurance paid in Advance - new policies bought 3,786.52 

New Construction 

New Boilers in Power Plant (uncompleted) 12,662.85 

Extraordinary Repairs (uncompleted) 16,305.27 

Forward 28,968.12 



330,702.43 



24,106.52 



$863,064.65 



16 



I 



Forward $863,064.65 

New Construction (continued) 

Forward 28,968.12 

Barclay Hall Fire Account 

Contributions to Fire Companies 500.00 

Reinstatement of Insurance Policies 360.58 

Co-Insurance Penalty 141.39 

Costs of Repairing Damage (uncompleted) . . . 14,021.62 
Transfers of Insurance to 

Furniture a/c 391.55 

Library Replacements 73.95 

For Students a/c , 1,242.75 1,708.25 16,731.84 45,699.96 

Investments Made or Donated 

Consolidated Investments Account 

Bonds - Government 100,000.00 

Industrial 24,562.50 

Public Utility 52,580.71 

Railroad 213,906.43 391,049.64 

Preferred Stocks - 

Industrial 66,610.98 

Public Utility 177,665.07 

Railroad 16.393.07 260,669.12 

Common Stocks - Bank 42,181.01 

Industrial 178,436.28 

Public Utility 57.742.92 278,360.21 

Mortgages 48,750.00 

Real Estate 48.00 978,876.97 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 19,335.58 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 

(First National Bank & Trust Co. of 
Minneapolis, Minn.) 
(Entered short - $2,000.00) 
Ellen W. Longstreth - Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 
Anna Yarnall Agency a/c 
Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 15,614.65 1,013,827.20 

Current Funds Invested 400,000.00 

Income Transferred to Principal , 

Moses Brown Fund 1,592.47 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 31.83 

George Peirce Prize Fund 106.97 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 132,59 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 25.53 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 42.69 1,932.08 

Borrowed Money 

Repaid in full 460,000.00 

Balances 8th Month 31, 1946 

In Treasurer's Account 89,043.66 

In President's Account 13,134.29 102.177.95 

$2,886,701.84 



17 



OPERATING STATEMENT 

For the Year Ending 8th Month 31, 1946 

Expenses of Running the College 

from foregoing statement $451,595.89 

Income against the Budget 

From College Sources $214,729.05 

less Tuition provided by scholarships 

from Income of Funds (Included below) $11,505.05 

from Donations applied 4,753.59 
less Donations for Salaries Carnegie 

Foundation Gift for Music applied 2,500.00 

Triangle Society Gift 1,000.00 

Alumni Association's Gift applied 3,139.93 22,898.57 

191,830.48 

Income from Funds fc Donations 
(applicable to Operating Account 
after capitalizing and Special Purposes) 

Income from Funds 

Donations as above 
for Scholarships 

for Salaries i 

for care of Cope Field applied 
for Government House applied 
for General Purposes 
from Alumni Sustaining Fund (net) 

From gains on Investments of 
Current Funds Invested 
Interest on same 

Student Loan Fund - repaid 

Receipts applicable to Operating Expenses 

Operating Loss for the Year 

Note: - The Receipts and Expenditures of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service, showing no gain or loss, 
are included in the above figures. 
There was no Accelerated Summer Term in 1946. 





193,651.82 




4,753.59 

6,639.93 

50.00 

500.00 

35.00 

24,012.21 


35,990.73 




20,000.00 
2,220.55 


22,220.55 
5,000.00 


448,693.58 
$ 2,902.31 



I 



18 



STATEMENT OF DEBT OF THE CORPORATION 



8th Month 31, 1946 



DEBT OF THE CORPORATION 



Debt of the Corporation 9th Month 1, 1945 



$9,009.59 



Increased - 

By refund tuition for student 
drafted 1941-42 
j 'By Operating Deficit 1945-46 

By Charge-off of Bank a/c - 

Merlon Title & Trust, finally liquidated 



150.00 
2,902.31 

7,230.23 



10,282.54 



Debt of the Corporation 8th Month 31, 1946 



$19,292.13 



19 



1917 FIDELITY- PHILAbELPHIA TRUST BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 



October 14, 1946. 



Board of Managers, 

The Corporation of Haverford College, 

Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Dear Sirs: 

We have examined the statement of receipts and expenditures 
and the operating statement for the fiscal year ended 8th Month 31, 1946, 
and the statement of debt of the corporation as of said date as set forth 
in the annual report of the Treasurer and Comptroller of The Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College. 

Our examination comprised the verification of the receipts and 
expenditures of the Treasurer and Comptroller for the year; the recon- 
ciliation of the cash balance at 8th Month 31, 1946 with the balance on 
deposit in banlc; and the examination of the securities held by the Provi- 
dent Trust Company as fiscal agent for the Corporation. 

In our opinion, the annual report of the Treasurer and Comp- 
troller correctly sets forth the results of the operations of The Cor- 
poration of Haverford College for the fiscal year ended 8th Month 31, 
1946, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied 
on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 



Very truly yours, 

Lawrence E. Brown & Company 
Certified Public Accoimtants 



20 



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27 



DONATIONS FOR ADDITIONS TO FUNDS 

1945 - 1946 

TRIANGLE SOCIETY ENDOWMENT FUND 

Proceeds of Policy on life of 

H. Conrad Atkinson, '40, who was 

lost in Pacific Area during War $500.00 

ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From -- Harry M. Zuckert 2,000.00 

CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through -- Dr. John W. Spaeth, Jr. 

From: H. E. McKinstry 20.00 

Donald Chandler 100.00 

Edmund T. Price. 100.00 

Robert B. Haines, 3rd 25.00 

Joseph Greene, Jr 100.00 

M. Alexander Laverty 10.00 

John W. Spaeth, Jr 15.00 

Albert W. Hall 20.00 

H. Lawrence Jones 10.00 

Newlin F. Paxson 25.00 425.00 

ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL FUND 

From -- Mrs. Almy C. Grant 1,000.00 

CHRISTL\N FEBIGER SCHOLARSHIP FUND (New) 

From -- Mrs. Madeline Seabury Febiger 8,000.00 

CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

From -- Mr. Joseph W. Sharp, Jr 200.00 

JACOB & EUGENIE BUCKY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 

From -- Colonial Trust Company, New York 

Through - Robert C. Thomson, Jr 1,000.00 

TILNEY MEMORIAL FUND 

Through -- I. Sheldon Tilney 

From: Georgiana S. Kirkbride 1,000.00 

Robert W. Tilney 2,000.00 3,000.00 



$16,125.00 



28 



DONATIONS 

FOR MEDIAEVAL MUSIC CONCERT 

From Dr. Pepinsky $100.00 

FOR ATHLETICS 

Class of 1922 - from C. M. Snader '22 80.00 

Field House - from A. W. Haddleton 29.50 109.50 

FOR BOOKS 

From Victor Schoepperle 'll - Greek Books . . . 100.00 

Oriental Books . . . 100.00 200.00 

From Library Associates: 

As per list on pages 578.00 

From Minor Library Donations 

Through Professor D. P. Lockwood 28.39 

From Matzke Royalties (from Publisher) 34.68 841.07 

FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

From Max Leuchter 100.00 

From Student Council of Haver ford- College 120.00 

From L. Szerlip 500.00 

From Guggenheim Foundation 400.00 

From Leslie C. Heath 200.00 

From Professor Douglas V. Steere 300.00 

From Anonymous Professor 100.00 

From Anonymous Professor 100.00 1,820.00 

FOR SALARIES 

From: Alumni Association 3,139.93 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB 

Through Dr. Oakley 

Anonymous 11.34 

Mr. Albert L. Baily, Jr 20.00 

Mrs. Henry L. Balderston 2.00 

Mr. Wilfred Bancroft 5.00 

Mr. Daniel B. Boyer 5.00 

Mr. Samuel T. Brinton 1.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. E. Cadbury, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Aldo Caselli 2.00 

Mrs. Julia Cope Collins 5.00 

Mrs. Sydney B. Dunn 20.00 

Mr. Charles Evans 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Green 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Haddleton 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Hetzel 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Jones 10.00 

Mr. John A. Kelly 5.00 

Mr. Morris E. Leeds 25.00 

Mr. M. A. Linton 5.00 



Forward 132.34 $6,010.50 



29 



Forward $6,010.50 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB (continued) 

Forward 132.34 

Mr. John C. Lober 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Meldrum 2.00 

Mr. C. C. Morris 10.00 

Mr. Marriott C. Morris 2.00 

Mr. Johi) W. Muir 1.00 

Mr. George Norris 1.00 

Dr. Tliomas Parke 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pfund 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Post 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Ruhland Rebmann 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Sargent 5.00 

Mr. A. G. Scattergood 10.00 

Mr. J. Henry Scattergood 5.00 

Mr. Jonathan M. Steere 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Teaf 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis W. Van Meter 5.00 

Mrs. E. O. Warner 1.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Wilson 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Woolman 10.00 

Sale of trees 25.00 263.34 

FOR CARE OF COPE FIELD 

From Alfred G. Scattergood, Trustee 50.00 

FOR»l COLLEGE LANE IMPROVEMENTS 

From Dr. Herndon 370.00 

FOR PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

From Dr. Pepinsky 10.00 

FOR PHYSICS LABORATORY 

From Dr. Sutton 10.72 

FOR RADIO CLUB 

Interest Allowed 63.12 

RAIN DAMAGE - MERION HALL 

From A. Caselli 8.50 

TRAVEUNG EXPENSE 

From Dr. Oakley 4.50 

UNSPECIFIED 

From Rev. A. Fifer 35.00 

A. Caselli 51.34 

Class of 1934 85.00 171.34 

ALUMNI SUSTAINING FUND 

As per following list of contributors 30.286.20 

$ 37,248.22 

30 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE "ALUMNI FUND " 

The Class of 1881 

L. T. Edwards $10.00 $10.00 

The Class of 1882 

]. Henley Morgan 1.00 

Edward Randolph 10.00 

Lindley M. Winston 5.00 16.00 

The Class of 1883 

William L. Baily 5.00 

Stephen W. Collins 5.00 

Charles H. Whitney 5^ 15.00 

The Class of 1884 

J. Henry Allen 2JCI0 2.00 

The Class of 1885 

William T. Ferris 25.00 

Arthur W. Jones 10.00 

Rufus M. Jones 20.00 

Marriott C. Morris 25.00 80.00 

The Class of 1887 

Edward F. Chillman 8.00 

Allen B. Clement 10.00 

Alfred C. Garrett 200.00 

Henry H. Goddard 10.00 

Willis H. Hazard 25.00 

Frederic H. Strawbridge 125.00 378.00 

The Class of 1888 

Henry V. Gummere 10.00 

Morris E. Leeds 1,000.00 

William D. Lewis 10.00 

Joseph W. Sharp, Jr 20.00 1,040.00 

The Class of 1889 

Thomas Evans 100.00 

Lawrence J. Morris 50.00 

Warner Fite 10.00 

Franklin B. Kirkbride 10.00 

Charles M. Shupert 5.00 

J. Stogdell Stokes 25.00 

Frank E. Thompson 10.00 210.00 

The Class of 1890 

George T. Butler •. . 25.00 

Charles T. Cottrell 25.00 

Guy H. Davies 50.00 

Thomas S. Janney 10.00 

Jonathan M. Steere 100.00 

Robert R. Tatnall 5.00 215.00 

The Class of 1891 

Carey Coale 5.00 

David L. Mekeel 5.00 

Henry A. Todd 5^00 15.00 

Forward $1,981.00 



31 



Forward $1,981.00 

The Class of 1892 

Augustine W. Blair 2.50 

Benjamin Cadbury 10.00 

Walter M. Hart 10.00 

Arthur Hoopes 15.00 

John W. Muir 10.00 

W. Nelson L. West 100.00 147.50 

The Class of 1893 

Leslie A. Baily 5.00 

Walter W. Haviland 3.00 

Clarence G. Hoag 20.00 

A. V. Morton 10.00 

Charles J. Rhoads 100.00 

Barton Sensenig 10.00 

Edward Woolman 100.00 

Gifford K. Wright 25.00 273.00 

The Class of 1894 

J. Henry Bartlett 10.00 

Alfred Busselle . . 10.00 

William W. Comfort 25.00 

Henry S. Conard 5.00 

George B. Dean 5.00 

Clifford B. Farr 5.00 

Martin N. Miller 10.00 

Edward E. Quimby 10.00 

Frederick P. Ristine 100.00 

Jonathan T. Rorer 5.00 185.00 

The Class A 1895 

Frank H. Conklin .- 25.00 

Allen C. Thomas 50.00 75.00 

The Class of 1896 

George R. Allen 25.00 

William H. Bettle 10.00 

Arthur F. Coca 10.00 

Thomas H. Haines 10.00 

Albert D. Hartley 1.00 

William W. Hastings 10.00 

John A. Lester 5.00 

J. Henry Scattergood 250.00 

L. Hollingsworth Wood 25.00 346.00 

The Class of 1897 

Thomas M. Chalfant , 75.00 

Alfred M. Collins 100.00 

Charles H. Howson 25.00 

John E. Hume 10.00 

Roswell C. McCrea 20.00 

William G. Rhoads 10.00 240.00 

The Class of 189 8 

C. Herbert Bell 10.00 

Vincent Gilpin 25.00 

John I. Lane 10.00 

Morris M. Lee 10.00 



Forward 55.00 $3,247.50 



32 



Forward $3,247.50 

The Class of 1898 (continued) 

Forward 55.00 

Oscar P. Moffitt 10.00 

S. Rowland Morgan 2.00 

Alfred G. Scattergood 100.00 

Francis R. Strawbridge 100.00 

Fred A. Swan 10.00 

Robert N. Wilson 10.00 

Thomas Wistar 50.00 

Richard D. Wood 10.00 347.00 

The Class of 1899 

William A. Battey 100.00 

John D. Carter 5.00 

F. Algernon Evans 500.00 

Edward H. Lycett, Jr 10.00 

Joseph P. Morris 10.00 

H. C. Petty 5.00 

E. Roberts Richie 100.00 

Clement Wild 10.00 740.00 

The Class of 1900 

W. B. Bell 25.00 

Robert J. Burdette 10.00 

Francis R. Cope, Jr 25.00 

Henry S. Drinker 100.00 

Frank M. Eshleman 10.00 

Henry M. Hallett 10.00 

Walter S. Hinchman 10.00 

Furman S. Howson 25.00 

J. Irving Peelle 10.00 

F. C. Sharpless 100.00 

Abram G. Tatnall 5.00 

Wilfred W. White 25.00 355.00 

The Class of 1901 

John W. Cadbury, Jr 5.00 

William E. Cadbury 20.00 

Laurence W. DeMotte 10.00 

Lovett Dewees 20.00 

William H. Kirkbride 10.00 

Herbert S. Langfeld 10.00 

W. LaCoste Neilson 10.00 85.00 

The Class of 1902 

Edgar H. Boles 100.00 

Charles Evans 10.00 

Edward W. Evans 50.00 

Richard M. Gummere 5.00 

S. Percy Jones 10.00 

William C. Longstreth 10.00 

Galloway C. Morris 5.00 

Gurney E. Newlin 10.00 

William P. Philips 2,500.00 

J. W. Reeder 100.00 

Robert J. Ross 30.00 

John L. Stone 10.00 

Edgar E. Trout 10.00 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 50.00 2,900.00 

Forward $7,674.50 

33 



Forward $7,674.50 

The Class of 1903 

A. Griffin Dean 10.00 

Harry A. Domincovich 15.00 

James B. Drinker 10.00 

U. Mercur Eshleman 10.00 

Enoch F. Hoffman 5.00 

Cadwalader W. Kelsey 25.00 

Arthur J. Phillips 25.00 

I. Sheldon Tilney 15.00 

Howard M. Trueblood 10.00 125.00 

The Class of 1904 

William S. Bradley 5.00 

Arthur Crowell 25.00 

Philip D. Folwell 50.00 

George K. Helbert 25.00 

William M. Kimber 10.00 

Bernard Lester 10.00 

C. C. Morris 500.00 

Harold H. Morris 25.00 

Charles R. Owen 25.00 

Edgar T. Snipes 10.00 

Samuel C. Withers .' 15.00 

William M. Wills 5.00 705.00 

The Class of 1905 

Thomas M. Bales 5.00 

Sydney M. Boher 20.00 

Henry G. Cox 5.00 

Benjamin Eshleman 25.00 

Arthur H. Hopkins 15.00 

Paul Jones 100.00 

Charles S. Lee , 10.00 

Joseph H. Morris 10.00 

E. Converse Peirce 10.00 

Glyndon Priestman » 10.00 

Charles Ritts 25.00 

Leslie B. Seely 25.00 

Sigmund Spaeth 10.00 

Herman K. Stein 50.00 

Howard P. Thomas 10.00 

Ralph W. Trueblood 10.00 

Edwards F. Winslow 5.00 345.00 

The Class of 1906 

Thomas Crowell 10.00 

Gordon H. Graves 7.00 

Albert W. Hemphill 25.00 

H. Boardman Hopper 25.00 

James Monroe 50.00 

Francis B. Morris 5.00 

Henry Pleasants, Jr 10.00 

Albert K. Smiley 50.00 

John A. Stratton 10.00 

Francis R. Taylor 150.00 

Joseph J. Tunney 50.00 

W. A. Young 5.00 397.00 

Forward $9,246.50 



34 



Forward $9,246.50 

The Class of 1907 

Joseph C. Birdsall 2,000.00 

Harold Evans 250.00 

Samuel J. Gummere 10.00 

Ernest F. Jones 3.00 

James P. Magill 114.41 

William R. Rossmassler 10.00 

Emmett R. Tatnall 10.00 

Alex N. Warner 10.00 

W. Butler Windle 5.00 

George H. Wood 10.00 2,422.41 

The Class of 1908 

Fisher C. Baily 5.00 

Howard Burtt 15.00 

Dudley D. Carroll 5.00 

J. Browning Clement 10.00 

E. A. Edwards 25.00 

J. Passmore Elkinton 5.00 

J. Jarden Guenther 10.00 

Thomas R. Hill 10.00 

Walter E. Lewis 5.00 

George K. Strode 5.00 

M. Albert Linton 50.00 

T. Morris Longstreth 10.00 

Charles L. Miller 15.00 

William H. Morriss 25.00 

Charles H. Rogers 10.00 

Winthrop Sargent 10.00 

Hugh Smiley 5.00 

Edwin Wright 5.00 225.00 

The Class of 1909 

R. Newton Brey 10.00 

Percival B. Fay 10.00 

William S. Febiger 100.00 

Allan J. Hill 50.00 

Howard M. Lutz 1.00 

Paul Van R. Miller 50.00 

Joseph W. Pennypacker 25.00 

J. Warrington Stokes 10.00 

Frederick R. Taylor 10.00 266.00 

The Class of 1910 

E. Page Allinson 50.00 

Earl S. Cadbury 1.00 

Edward W. David 25.00 

Joseph C. Develin 10.00 

E. Nelson Edwards 50.00 

Rodney M. Eshleman 5.00 

Carroll A. Haines 10.00 

Harrison S. Hires 1,000.00 

Arthur W. Hutton 10.00 

John D. Kenderdine 5.00 

George A. Kerbaugh 10.00 

Charles M. Leininger 200.00 

Sidney Loewenstein 10.00 

Industrial Hosiery Mills, Inc., (via C. M. Leininger) 600.00 

Forward 1,986.00 $12,159.91 



35 



Forward $12,159.91 

The Class of 1910 (continued) ^ 

Forward 1,986.00 

Christopher Morley 50.00 

Reginald H. Morris 10.00 

Walter Palmer 20.00 

Samuel A. Rabinowitz 5.00 

Charles S. Ristine 100.00 

Perry B. Strassburger 5.00 

Willard Tomlinson 15.00 2,191.00 

The Class of 1911 

Daniel B. Boyer 25.00 

John S. Bradway 10.00 

Philip B. Deane 50.00 

John S. Downing 25.00 

Herbert V. B. Gallager 10.00 

William D. Hartshorne 10.00 

David Hinshaw 25.00 

William L. Kleinz 10.00 

L. Arnold Post 15.00 

D. Duer Reynolds 50.00 

Edwin A. Russell 100.00 

Victor Schoepperle 245.00 

L. R. Shero 20.00 

Gibson Smith 100.00 

Howard G. Taylor, Jr 5.00 

Walter Tebbetts 10.00 

Charles Wadsworth, III 50.00 

Caleb Winslow 2.50 

Alan S. Young 5.00 767.50 

The Class of 1912 

Stacey K. Beebe 10.00 

Robert E. Miller 25.00 

Charles T. Moon 10.00 

Irvin C. Poley 5.00 

Leonard C. Ritts 25.00 

Henry M. Thomas, Jr 30.00 

Richard Tunis 10.00 

Edward Wallerstein 50.00 165.00 

The Class of 1913 

Joseph M. Beatty 5.00 

William S. Crowder 10.00 

Charles G. Darlington 10.00 

Francis H. Diament 20.00 

Philip C. Gifford 5.00 

Norris F. Hall 10.00 

William Y. Hare 20.00 

Charles E. Hires 100.00 

Elisha T. Kirk 20.00 

William C. Longstreth 5.00 

Jesse D. Ludlam 50.00 

Edmund R. Maule 5.00 

Stephen W. Meader 25.00 

Lloyd H. Mendenhall 5.00 

George Montgomery 5.00 

Oliver M. Porter 5.00 

Forward 300.00 $15,283.41 



36 



Forward $15,283.41 

The Class of 1913 (continued) 

Forward 300.00 

John V. Van Sickle 7.00 

Frederick P. Stieff 10.00 

James E. Stinson 10.00 

Georges M. Weber 25.00 

Donald Wilder 5.00 

Edwards F. Winslow 5.00 

George L. Winslow 10.00 372.00 

The Class of 1914 

Walter G. Bowerman "... 10.00 

Carroll D. Champlin 10.00 

George V. Downing 10.00 

C. W. Edgerton 15.00 

Howard W. Eikinton 10.00 

Thomas W. Eikinton 500.00 

John K. Garrigues 25.00 

Edward M. Jones 20.00 

Rowland P. McKlnley 10.00 

Robert A. Locke 100.00 

Harold S. Miller 5.00 

Robert C. Smith 10.00 

S. Emlen Stokes 1,000.00 

Thomas Tomlinson . 10.00 

Charles K. Trueblood 10.00 

W. H. B. Whitall 100.00 

Charles R. Williams 5.00 1,850.00 

The Class of 1915 

Emmett R. Dunn 10.00 

Andrew Harvey 25.00 

Harold W. Helveston 15.00 

Felix Morley 25.00 

Edward L. Shaffer 5.00 

C. Brinkley Turner 5.00 

Walter E. Vail 25.00 

Donald B. VanHollen 5.00 115.00 

The Class of 1916 

Frederick C. Buffum 100.00 

Frank W. Cary 50.00 

James Carey, 3rd 25.00 

J. Arthur Cooper 5.00 

Bolton L. Corson 25.00 

George A. Dunlap 10.00 

Albert G. Garrigues 10.00 

William T. Hannum 10.00 

Robert C. Kendig 10.00 

William T. Kirk 15.00 

Philip L. Leidy 100.00 

J. Sidney Marine 10.00 

Ulric J. Mengert 10.00 

Thomas Steere 15.00 

Joseph Stokes, Jr 25.00 420.00 

Forward $18,040.41 



37 



Forward $18,040.41 

The Class of 1917 

Ernest L. Brown 20.00 

William H. Chamberlin 5.00 

Donald Chandler 10.00 

Loring Dam 10.00 

Joseph W. Greene, Jr 50.00 

Albert W. Hall 20.00 

Weston Howland 25.00 

H. Lawrence Jones 10.00 

Mennls Lawson 10.00 

H. E. McKlnstry 15.00 

Robert D. Metcalfe 10.00 

Gilbert H. Moore 25.00 

Newlin L. Paxson 25.00 

Edmund T. Price 100.00 

John W. Spaeth 10.00 

Arthur E. Spellissy 50.00 395.00 

The Class of 1918 

H. H. Arnold 15.00 

Herbert H. Bell 10.00 

Bennett S. Cooper 15.00 

J. Marshall Crosman 10.00 

Stephen Curtis 5.00 

Robert H. Dann 5.00 

Frank Deacon 5.00 

Alfred H. Dewees 15.00 

Neil Gilmour 10.54 

Robert B. Greer 10.00 

H. M. Hallett 10.00 

William H. Harding 10.00 

Joseph H. Hayman, Jr 25.00 

Charles -Francis Long 15.00 

William Mussetter . . 50.00 

Herbert J. Painter 25.00 

Edward A. G. Porter 10.00 

Joseph W. Sharp 10.00 

Morris S. Shipley 25.00 

Oliver P. Tatum 10.00 

John W. Thacher 10.00 

Albert H. Tomlinson 25.00 

A. J. Townsend 5.00 330.54 

The Class of 1919 i 

Richard T. Battey 15.00 

William J. Brockelbank 2.00 

S. Hudson Chapman, Jr 5.00 

Philip L. Corson 25.00 

Franklin M. Earnest, Jr 10.00 

Francis Goodhue, 3rd 5.00 

Edgar B. Graves 5.00 

Mrs. Roy T. Griffith, In Memory of R. T. Griffith 5.00 

Hartley S. Haines 5.00 

George H. Hubler 25.00 

Furman H. Limeburner 25.00 

Thomas McConnell 50.00 

A. Douglas Oliver 10.00 

Walter P. Shipley, Jr 5.00 

Cleaver S. Thomas 15.00 

Elmer H. Thorpe 10.00 217.00 

Forward $18,982.95 

38 



Forward $18,982.95 

The Class of 1920 

Harold W. Brecht 5.00 

Truxton R. Broadhead 25.00 

Herman D. Carus 100.00 

Paul C. Crowther 20.00 

J. Russel Fitts 50.00 

Edwin O. Geckeler 200.00 

Frank T. Gucker 15.00 

Harry C. Hartman 10.00 

Horace P. Hill 100.00 

Milton A. Kamsler 25.00 

A. Douglas Knowlton 100.00 

Norman F. Milne 100.00 

Thomas E. Morris 25.00 

Robert R. Porter 15.00 

Edward L. Smith, Jr 25,00 

Horace F. Spencer 10.00 

C. W. Ufford 10.00 

John S. Williams 25.00 

Richard R. Wood 10.00 

Granville Worrell, 2nd 55.00 925.00 

The Class of 1921 

C. Addison Brinton 10.00 

Elliot W. Brown 25.00 

S. Newcomb Ewan, Jr 10.00 

Edward C. Haines 5.00 

A, W. Hastings 10.00 

Edmund G. Hauff 10.00 

Eugene B. Heilman 50.00 

John R. Hoopes 25.00 

William T. Jebb 10.00 

J. Barclay Jones 5.00 

Henry W. Kumm 5.00 

J. W. Leonard 25.00 

Julian S. Long 25.00 

Archibald Macintosh 25.00 

Raymond T. Ohl 5.00 

M. Huyett Sangree 10.00 

B. B. Weatherby 50.00 ^ 

Robert N. Wood 50.00 355.00 

The Class of 1922 

Charles D. Abbott 10.00 

John B. Barker 15.00 

K. Braddock-Rogers 3.00 

Andrew Brown 10.00 

Henry S. Fraser 10.00 

John F. Gummere 10.00 

George A. Hilleman 25.00 

Ralph A. Klemm 5.00 

Robert R. Matzke 5.00 

Frederick S. Miller 10.00 

Elliston Morris 10.00 

Chauncey G. Paxson 10.00 

Craige M. Snader 15.00 

Richard M. Sutton 35.00 

Edward A. Taylor 5.00 



Forward 178.00 $20,262.95 



39 



Forward $20,262.95 

The Class of 1922 (continued) 

Forward 178.00 

Kenneth B. Walton 50.00 

J. Colvin Wright 25.00 

Edwin W. Zerrer 10.00 263.00 

The Class of 1923 

R. G. Allen 100.00 

John C. Borton 5.00 

H. Tatnall Brown, Jr 5.00 

Hal G. Farrar 25.00 

F. S. Flowers 10.00 

Gilbert C. Fry 50.00 

E. K. Haviland 10.00 

Rees S. Himes 5.00 

Garrett S. Hoag 25.00 

W. C. Hunsicker, Jr. . . 5.00 

Wilmot R. Jones 25.00 

S. Brooks Knowlton 5.00 

Andrew L. Lewis 10.00 

Thomas Parke 25.00 

John B. Stevenson 5.00 

C. Bevan Strayer 2.00 

Charles Warner, Jr 50.00 

Farnham Warriner 10.00 

Alexander J. Williamson 5.00 377.00 

The Class of 1924 

Charles F. Bader, Jr 10.00 

Courtland B. Brinton 15.00 

Hugh P. Brinton 5.00 

J. Stanton Carson 50.00 

Rowland C. Cocks 5.00 

Howard Comfort 5.00 

Thomas S. Ellis 10.00 

Charles H. Frazier 25.00 

Harold D. Greenwell 10.00 

Gaylord P. Harnwell 25.00 

Howard J. Hogenauer 250.00 

Philip G. Rhoads 20.00 

Edward P. VanTine 25.00 

William N. West, 3rd 25.00 

Donald E. Wilbur 10.00 490.00 

The Class of 1925 

Conrad Acton 5.00 

Eric G. Ball 10.00 

Francis C. Barton, Jr 10.00 

Robert C. Bates, Jr 10.00 

Wray D. Bentley 10.00 

Leigh E. Chadwick 10.00 

Class of 1925 4.64 

Douglas W. Eiseman 5.00 

Thomas C. Garrett 10.00 

Harman A. Gerkes 10.00 

Edward L. Gordy 5.00 

J. S. C. Harvey, Jr 5.00 

H. Richard Heilman 10.00 

Forward 104.64 $21,392.95 



40 



Forward , $21,392.95 

The Class of 1925 (continued) 

Forward 104.64 

Irving Hollingshead 10.00 

Henry F. House 10.00 

Charles H. Johnson, Jr 25.00 

Phillips Johnson 10.00 

Karl G. Kumm 5.00 

Hugh Montgomery 5.00 

Warren W. Newman 15.00 

Jesse T. Nicholson 25.00 

Owen B. Rhoads 50.00 

William D. Rogers 5.00 

Albert E. Savage 25.00 

Charles C. Sellers 5.00 

Francis M. Stifler 10.00 

Louis E. Taubel 5.00 

Charles L. S. Tingley, Jr 100.00 

Benjamin B. Warfield 10.00 

Austin Wright 10.00 429.64 

The Class of 1926 

Donald G. Baker 5.00 

Schuyler Baldwin 5.00 

Robert Barry, II .• 5.00 

Alfred E. Buck 5.00 

Alfred Busselle, Jr 5.00 

John B. Calkin 10.00 

Francis F. Campbell 10.00 

Alexander R. Carman, Jr 40.00 

Franklin O. Curtis 10.00 

Henry C. Evans 10.00 

Charles H. Greene 5.00 

Edmund P. Hannum 25.00 

Siddons Harper, Jr 10.00 

Dalzell F. Hartman 10.00 

Robert L. Hatcher 5.00 

Harris G. Haviland 10.00 

Isaac L. Hibberd 10.00 

Wayne G. Jackson 15.00 

J. D. Joly 10.00 

Winthrop M. Leeds 50.00 

Benjamin H. Lowry 25.00 

Howard T. MacGowan 10.00 

Willard E. Mead 25.00 

Robert H. Richie 5.00 

Fred Rodell 5.00 

Paul L. Sassaman 10.00 

C. Earnest Shank 10.00 

Charles E. Sumwalt 10.00 

Joseph A. Vansant 10.00 

Edward S. Wood, Jr 10.00 375.00 

The Class of 1 927 

Samuel Armstrong 5.00 

James W. Baker 10.00 

M. Ward Bayles 5.00 

Herman E. Compter 10.00 

Daniel M. Coxe 10.00 



Forward 40.00 $22,197.59 



41 



Forward $22,197.59 

The Class of 1927 (continued) 

Forward , 40.00 

Allan B. Fay 15.00 

John E. Forsythe 5.00 

Albert W, Fowler *. 5.00 

William S. Halstead 10.00 

John L. Heller 5.00 

Arland I. Innes 10.00 

John C. Lober 20.00 

Paul W. Ohl 10.00 

George H. Renninger . 10.00 

Ira B, Rutherford 15.00 

Franklin Sanders 8.00 

S. Stansfeld Sargent 5.00 

George E. Saunders 15.00 

William W. Saunders 10.00 

Watson Scarborough 2.00 

Arthur Silver 15.00 

W. B. Totten 10.00 210.00 

The Class of 1928 

Carl F. Berlinger 5.00 

Frederick M. Burgess 10.00 

Royal S. Davis • 5.00 

John T. Evans 5.00 

John O. Fitzsimmons 10.00 

C. Keely Fox 5,00 

William K. Hartzell 20.00 

Theodore B. Hetzel 10.00 

Nelson J. Hogenauer 10.00 

Allen F. Horton 10.00 

J. Quincy Hunsicker, 3rd 10.00 

J. McLain King 10.00 

S. Burkhart Morrison 10.00 

Alexander L. Nichols 10.00 

Jonathan E. Rhoads 25.00 

Ingram H. Richardson 25.00 

Donald W. Richie 10.00 

Louis F. Richter 3.00 

Charles Robinson 25.00 

Robert L. Shank 25.00 

Franklin W. Smith 10.00 

Ellsworth B. Stevens 10.00 

J. Tyson Stokes 50.00 

Charles M. Tatum 10.00 

Allen C. Thomas, Jr 10.00 

Theo Vanneman 10.00 

Theodore Whittelsey, Jr 10.00 

Richard Wlstar 10.00 363.00 

The Class of 1929 

Samuel T. Brinton 10.00 

Rc^er C. Brown 10.00 

John R. Cooper 10.00 

F. Curtis Dohan 5.00 

James G. Downward 25.00 

Herbert K. Ensworth 10.00 

John G. Hartman 5.00 



Forward 75.00 $22,770.59 



42 



Forward $22,770.59 

The Class of 1929 (continued) 

Forward 75.00 

Halsey M. Hicks 5.00 

Kenneth E. Kingham 10.00 

William S. Lane 3.00 

Davis D. Lewis 10.00 

Gerald H. Rorer 10.00 

J. Clifford Scott 5.00 

Daniel D. Test, Jr 5.00 

Harold L. Wilt 25.00 148.00 

The Class of 1930 

Bradford S. Abernethy 10.00 

John L. Blackman, Jr 10.00 

B. Franklin Blair 10.00 

W. Richardson Blair 5.00 

Arthur H. Brinton 5.00 

T. Ward Bruegel 10.00 

Donald R. Buxton 25.00 

Willem Ezerman 5.00 

William D. Frazier 25.00 

W. Clark Hanna 5.00 

Allen D. Hole '. 5.00 

John Hymes 10.00 

John P. Jones 10.00 

William M. Masland 10.00 

Irvin W. McConnell 10.00 

Brewster H. Morris 15.00 

J. Howard Morris, Jr 250.00 

Theodore H. Morris, UI 10.00 

Edward Rosewater 10.00 

Harlow B. Rowell 15.00 

William E. Rudge 5.00 

Daniel Smiley, Jr 30.00 

Frederick W. Swan 2.50 

George Vaux 10.00 

Wilfred H. Wickersham 10.00 

Thomas Wistar, Jr 6.00 518.50 

The Class of 1931 



Richard Baker 5.00 

Henry G. Barnhurst 5.00 

J. W. Burger 3.00 

Thomas E. Burns, Jr 10.00 

William E. Cadbury, Jr 3.00 

S. Hall Conn 10.00 

Alfred R. Crawford 10.00 

Robert W. Gabriel 10.00 

Donald L. Gibson 5.00 

John T. Golding 25.00 

John D. Gresimer 2.50 

James M. Houston 25.00 

Jonathan P. Jessop 5.00 

William Maier 25.00 

Adrian S. Mann 10.00 

Lauman Martin 40.00 

Raymond E. Maxwell 5.00 

E. C. Saint 25.00 

Forward 223.50 $23,437.09 



43 



Forward $23,437.09 

The Class of 1931 (continued) 

Forward 223.50 

E. Rodman Shippen, Jr 5.00 

Frank N. Speller, Jr 10.00 

Walter M. Teller 5.00 

Ignatius M. Weiringer 5.00 

John H. Wills 10.00 258.50 

The Class of 1932 

Carl B. Allendoerfer 25.00 

Howland H. Bailey 10.00 

Richard D. Browne 10.00 

Walter C. Baker 15.00 

Walter I. Dothard, Jr 20.00 

N. Stine Eckert 50.00 

R. F. Engle, Jr 5.00 

Harry Fields 25.00 

Gifford P. Foley 10.00 

George Gerenbeck, Jr 10.00 

Francis B. Gummere 5.00 

C. Robert Haines 10.00 

Lewis Kohn 5.00 

William E. Miller 10.00 

Ellis C. Osgood 10.00 

Thomas I. Potts 5.00 

William W. Pusey, lU 3.00 

Arthur S. Roberts 5.00 

Fred Rudge 20.00 

Harold J. Schramm 50.00 

Wallace M. Scudder 25.00 

John W. Settle 25.00 

William V. Sipple, Jr 10.00 

Albert K. Smiley, Jr 10.00 

Franklin J. Smith .' 5.00 

Charles S. Strickler 25.00 

Allen M. Terrell 5.00 

Rudolph M. Wertime 5.00 

Robert Woodward 5.00 418.00 

The Class of 1933 

Douglas Borgstedt 5.00 

William B. Daub 25.00 

Frederick L. Fuges 10.00 

R. Wilfred Kelsey 10.00 

Bernard V. Lentz 10.00 

John W. Masland 5.00 

Hugh B. Pickard 10.00 

William R. Russell 10.00 

John R. Sargent 15.00 

Henry Scattergood 5.00 

Howard D. Sordon, Jr 5.00 

W. Hooton Stokes 20.00 

F. A. VanDenbergh, Jr 25.00 155.00 

The Class of 1934 

Robert C. Atmore 5.00 

Charles M. Bancroft 5.00 

Thomas S. Brown 5.00 

Forward 15.00 $24,268.59 



44 



Forward $24,268.59 

The Class of 1934 (continued) 

Forward 15.00 

Fritz K. Downey 5.00 

Louis W. Flaccus, Jr 10.00 

J. Morton Fultz, Jr 5.00 

Leonard L. Greif, Jr 25.00 

William H. Haines, 3rd 5.00 

EUwood M. Hammaker 2.00 

J. O. Hancock 5.00 

Eugene F. Hogenauer 10.00 

R. Bruce Jones 5.00 

James D. Lockard 5.00 

Benjamin S. Loewenstein 10.00 

W. F. Maxfield 10.00 

Robert W. McKee 5.00 

Richard R. Pleasants 10.00 

Asa W. Potts 2.00 

A. Thomas Richie 2.00 

Henry G. Russell 3.00 

Roger Scattergood 5.00 

Frank T. Siebert, Jr 10.00 

Arthur G. Singer, Jr 10.00 

William W. Smith 30.00 

H. Miles Snyder 25.00 

Matthew W. Stanley 5.00 

Francis W. Stork 5.00 

Edwin P. Tripp, Jr 50.00 

John C. Wilson 2.00 

F. H. Wright 10.00 

Willard M. Wright, Jr 5.00 291.00 

The Class of 1935 

William L. Azpell, Jr 10.00 

William R. Bowden 10.00 

Chapman Brown 5.00 

B. Bartram Cadbury 5.00 

John B. Christopher 5.00 

Meredity B. Colket, Jr 2.00 

Charles B. Conn, Jr 5.00 

John C. Duffield 5.00 

John H. Elliott 5.00 

Ernest M. Evans 5.00 

Frederick E. Forester 2.00 

Sidney Hollander, Jr 5.00 

William N. Huff 5.00 

James B. Kase 25.00 

William G. Kirkland 10.00 

E. Charles Kunkle 10.00 

Edward J. Matlack 15.00 

Harry C. Meserve 5.00 

Samuel Potter, Jr 5.00 

Kimberley S. Roberts 15.00 

Graham Rohrer 25.00 

Frederic N. Rolf 5.00 

Charles F. G. Smith 10.00 

Philip P. Steptoe, Jr 15.00 

Francis J. Stokes, Jr 15.00 

Robert S.'Trenbath 10.00 

Alexander C. Wood, 3rd 5.00 239.00 

Forward $24,798.59 

45 



Forward $24,798.59 

The Class of 1936 

E. Dale Adkins, Jr 5.00 

Robert W. Baird, Jr 50.00 

George B. Bookman 20.00 

Robert Braucher 20.00 

Donald W. Brous 10.00 

Jonathan A. Brown 15.00 

Thomas D. Brown 2.00 

William R. Brown, 3rd 5.00 

William A. Crawford 10.00 

Arthur S. Dulaney, Jr 15.00 

Francis C. Evans 20.00 

William R. Fry 20.00 

L. Ross Garner 25.00 

Robert S. Gawthrop, Jr 10.00 

John N. Goodridge 5.00 

Arthur R. Kane. Jr - 20.00 

Samuel Kind , 5.00 

William H. Loesche, Jr 2.00 

Park Hays Miller, Jr 10.00 

W. Brooke Morgan, Jr 2.00 

Charles C. Morris, 2nd 4.00 

Ralph C. Most 10.00 

John L. Parker 2.00 

Harry T. Paxton 10.00 

James W. Pearce, Jr 5.00 

James G. Pierce 10.00 

Joseph D. Purvis, Jr 25.00 

John Sebastian 25.00 

Joseph H. Taylor 2.00 

William G. Tiernan 10.00 

George B. Thomas, Jr 5.00 

Henry L. Tomkinson 5.00 

John Van Brunt, Jr 5.00 

Hubert M. Vining 100.00 

Alexander C. Williams 15.00 504.00 

The Class of 1937 

William W. Allen, 3rd 10.00 

Howard A. Andrews 10.00 

Thomas S. Barker, Jr 10.00 

Kenneth A. Beck 15.00 

William H. Bond 2.00 

Stephen G. Cary 5.00 

Richard M. Clayton 10.00 

William H. Daudt 15.00 

Henry S. Drinker, Jr 10.00 

Hans B. Engelman 10.00 

Roger L. Grief 25.00 

Henry C. Gulbrandsen 10.00 

Edward L. Hawkins 5.00 

Bernard M. Hollander 5.00 

Charles E. Holzer, Jr 20.00 

James D. Hoover 10.00 

W. L. Kimber 15.00 

Robert H. Krieble 5.00 

John J. Lawser 5.00 

John A. Lester . . 3.00 

Forward 200.00 $25,302.59 



46 



Forward $25,302.59 

V 

The Class of 1937 (continued) 

Forward 200.00 

M. Albert Linton, Jr 10.00 

James H. Lockwood 10.00 

John B. Lukens 10.00 

Ralph H. McMahon 10.00 

George Norris, Jr 10.00 

William R. Reynolds 5.00 

Peter P. Rodman 5.00 

Leslie B. Seely, Jr 25.00 

Herbert W. Taylor, Jr 5.00 

Philip M. Whitman 15.00 

S. Vincent Wilking 10.00 

Jay W. Worrall, Jr 2.00 

Arthur N. Wrigley 2.00 319.00 

The Class of 1938 

Harry H. Bell 5.00 

Thomas A. Benham 10.00 

Robert M. Bird, Jr 5.00 

Richard S. Bowman 5.00 

William H. Clark, Jr 5.00 

Henry B. Cox 5.00 

Donald S. Childs, Jr 25.00 

Valery S. deBeausset 2.00 

Aubrey C. Dickson, Jr 10.00 

William Duff 10.00 

Charles R. Ebersol 10.00 

Samuel R. Evans 10.00 

Roderick Firth 5.00 

William N. Fraleigh 10.00 

James M. George 2.00 

J. E. Goldmark 2.50 

Samuel K. Harper 2.00 

Wendell T. Kershner 10.00 

Louis B. Kohn, 3rd 25.00 

William B. Kriebel 5.00 

Charles H. Ligon 5.00 

Henry C. Longnecker 5.00 

William H. Luden, Jr 50.00 

George Mathues 1.00 

Malcolm D. McFarland 5.00 

Elliott H. Morse 5.00 

L. Folsom Norsworthy 10.00 

D. S. Pakradooni 10.00 

George E. Poole 10.00 

Frank M. Ramsey, Jr 10.00 

Clayton E. Ranck , 10.00 

Lindley Reagan < 5.00 

James L. Rich 5.00 

Leslie B. Schramm 50.00 

Philip R. Shank 15.00 

Trumbull L. Simmons 25.00 

Jonathan M. Steere, Jr 5.00 

Samuel S. Stratton 5.00 

T. Cooper Tatman 25.00 

Hubert R. Taylor 5.00 

Irving Telling 5.00 

Forward 429.50 $25,621.59 



47 



Forward $25,621.59 

The Class of 1938 (continued) 

Forward 429.50 

Robert J. Thompson 20.00 

Louis J. Velte, Jr 10.00 

William M. Webb 20.00 

Hambleton Welbourne, Jr 20.00 

Lawrence G. Wesson, Jr 10.00 

Edmund C. Wingerd, Jr 5.00 514.50 

The Class of 1939 

Robert B. Ackerman 10.00 

Robert L. Balderston 10.00 

George G. Bown 5.00 

James H. Bready 2.00 

Robert Burnside 10.00 

Henry H. Derr 10.00 

William E. Evans 20.00 

John A. Flick , 5.00 

Robert Herr 5.00 

Henry H. Jones 15.00 

Richard H. Lillie 10,00 

Alexander W. Moseley 20.00 

O. Naylor Rambo, Jr 10.00 

Daniel G. Santer 25.00 

Craig M. Sharpe 5.00 

Laird H. Simons, Jr 100.00 

Robert E. Spaulding 5.00 

Gilbert P. Talbot 5»00 

Robert M. White 10.00 

D. Norton Williams 10.00 292.00 

The Class of 1940 

Bruce D. Anderton 5.00 

David B. Coursin 5.00 

Robert L. Dewees 10.00 

Charles W. Fisher 5.00 

Robert H. Goepp 5.00 

Harry J. Goodyear 10.00 

John E, Gross 1.00 

Hanford Henderson 5.00 

John T. Hoffman 5.00 

Robert J. Hunn 10.00 

Joachim Jaenicke 1.00 

S, F. Johnson 5.00 

F. Allen Lewis 2.00 

John M. Lindley, Jr 5.00 

Elliott Mason 10.00 

Hayden Mason 3.00 

William F. McDevit 10.00 

Charles K. Peters 10.00 

Richard A. Poole 25.00 

David R. Wilson 5.00 

Charles H. Wolfii^er 10.00 147.00 

The Class of 1941 

E. P. Allinson, Jr 10.00 

David B. Arnold 10.00 

Robert P. Arthur 10.00 

Forward 30,00 $26,575.09 



48 



Forward $26,575.09 

The Class of 1941 (continued) 

Forward 30.00 

Arthur G. Ashbrook, Jr 5.00 

Howard L. Blum 25.00 

R. H. Bolster 5.00 

Eugene Botelho 10.61 

Daniel B. Boyer, Jr 10.00 

Albert D. Branson 10.00 

John Buttrick 10.00 

Torrence H. Chambers 10.00 

John B. Clark 5.00 

Henry D. Cornman 5.00 

Hunt Davis 10.00 

John W. Dorsey 6.00 

Edward L. Engelhardt 25.00 

Robert N. Evert 15.00 

Geoffrey Hemphill 3.00 

John B. Hibbard 10.00 

Andrew F. Inglis 50.00 

William A. Liddell, Jr 5.00 

Thomas Little 5.00 

John R. McNeill 25.00 

William K. Miller 5.00 

Tucker F. Morian 5.00 

Arthur H. Napier, Jr 5.00 

Wilson H. Pile 2.00 

Robert H. Smith 15.00 

G. Ralph Strohl, Jr 20.00 

Harry H. Stuart 25.00 

George M. Swan 10.00 

Roy S. Vogt 5.00 

James M. Willis 15.00 

Caleb Winslow 2.50 

Kenneth A. Wright 15.00 404.11 

The Class of 1942 

Charles C. Abbott 10.00 

James N. Addoms 10.00 

George L. Aldridge 20.00 

Warren D. Anderson 5.00 

Edgar D. Bell 10.00 

Burns Brodhead 5.00 

Richard W. Brown 15.00 

E. E. Childs 5.00 

Thomas C. Cochran, Jr 10.00 

Robert W. Dunham 5.00 

Roy A. Dye, Jr 10.00 

Arthur Evans 5.00 

John D. Farquhar 10.00 

John A. Fust 5.00 

Thomas C. Gibb 10.00 

Louis N. Grier, Jr 5.00 

J. Jarden Guenther, Jr 5.00 

Gove Hambidge, Jr 10.00 

Heber R. Harper 10.00 

Henry W. Johnstone, Jr 5.00 

William S. Laughlin 1.00 

George C. Lewis, Jr 5.00 

Forward 176.00 $26,979.20 



49 



Forward $26,979.20 

The Class of 1942 (continued) 

Forward 176.00 

William B. Meldrum, Jr 5.00 

David M. Poole 25.00 

Kenneth S. Roberts 2.00 

Lewis P. Saxer 10.00 

W. H. W. Skerrett, Jr 5.00 

Robert W. Starr, 3rd 5.00 

Franklin P. Sweetser 50.00 

David C. Thompson 10.00 

John H. Wise 10.00 

W. Scott Worrall 5.00 303.00 

The Class of 1943 

Jeremy Addoms 2.00 

John Allen 15.00 

Eugene E. Anderson, Jr 50.00 

Arthur H. Bell 5.00 

Jared S. Brown 10.00 

Tristram P. Coffin 10.00 

Thomas H. Eckfeldt 10.00 

John J. Enck 50.00 

J. Morris Evans 10.00 

Sumner W. Ferris 25.00 

James B, Gilbert 10.00 

John F. Hill 30.00 

John R. Hogness 5.00 

Holland Hunter 76.00 

Lewis C. Kibbee 5.00 

David B. Kirk 5.00 

H, Mather Lippincott, Jr 5.00 

Robert MacCrate 10.00 

John C. Marsh 3.00 

Avrel Mason 25.00 

John H. Meader 10.00 

John M. Moon 5.00 

Sterling Newell, Jr 10.00 

Frank K. Otto 10.00 

Norman Peterkin 10.00 

Stuart L. Ridgway 20.00 

George M. Ryrie 10.00 

Seth T. Shepard 10.00 

William F. Shihadeh 5.00 

David D. Somers 10.00 

John D. Stevens, Jr 5.00 

J. S. Sutterlin 10.00 

John W. Thacher, Jr 5.00 

Alexander C. Tomlinson, Jr 50.00 

Haskell Torrence 5.00 

Albert E. Turner, 3rd 5.00 

William T. Warren, Jr 10.00 

John C. Whitehead 30.00 

Carl Widney, Jr 10.00 

John B. Wilkie 5.00 

William N. Wingerd 5.00 601.00 

Forward $27,883.20 



50 



Forward $27,883.20 

The Class of 1944 

C. Webster Abbott of J 10.00 

Charles S. Alden 10.00 

Ellsworth C. Alvord, Jr 100.00 

Donald H. Baird 25.00 

Louis P. Bolgiano, Jr 15.00 

A. G. Buyers 10.00 

John W. Clark 10.00 

Horace Compton, Jr 10.00 

Jodie D. Crabtree, Jr 5.00 

Robert B. Day 15.00 

Charles E. Fox, Jr 25.00 

Edgar D. Free 25.00 

Edmund Goerke, Jr 18.00 

Jesse G. Grier 5.00 

James C. Haden 10.00 

Edmond E. Hammond, Jr 5.00 

Robert W. Hill 2.00 

Walter Hollander, Jr 10.00 

George D. Hopkins 10.00 

John T. Hough 5.00 

George W. Hubler 5.00 

Robert M. Jacob 5.00 

J. W. Krom 20.00 

Charles McC. Mathias, Jr 5.00 

William R. McShane 10.00 

Gilbert H. Moore, Jr 7.00 

H. Royer Smith, Jr 50.00 

David E. St(*es 25.00 

Samuel E. Stokes, Jr 50.00 

Paul R. Stott 10.00 

Henry S. Vila 3.00 

Richard H. Warren 5.00 

Richard W. Watkins 5.00 

Howard Wood 10.00 

James H. Worl 25.00 560.00 

The Class of 1945 

Anna M. Atkinson *. 3.00 

Mary Barclay 25.00 

John Beardsley 25.00 

Edward Block 15.00 

Richard W. Cole 10.00 

F. E. Fairman, 3rd 10.00 

Henry H. Fetterman 5.00 

Elizabeth B. Garrison 2.00 

Arthur Karned 50.00 

E. M. Heimlich 10.00 

David Y. Y. Hsia 5.00 

Massamori Kojima 5.00 

David Mallery 5.00 

Philip C. Mann 5.00 

Edmund Preston 5.00 

Geert C. F. Prins , 10.00 

Donald A. Purdy 10.00 

Vernon M. Root 20.00 

Herbert N. Slotnick • 100.00 

Stacey Widdicombe 20.00 



Forward 340.00 $28,443.20 



51 



Forward $28,443.20 

The Class of 1945 (continued) 

Forward 340.00 

Mary E. Williams . 10.00 

James B. Wright 40.00 390.00 

The Class of 1946 

Frederick H. Bartlett, Jr 15.00 

Thomas M. Birdsall 15.00 

William H. Chartener 5.00 

Lewis Coffin 3.00 

Bertram M. Kummel 10.00 

George Montgomery, ]r 5.00 

James F. Mumma 15.00 

Thomas J. Ryan 25.00 93.00 

The Class of 1947 

Charles Long, 2nd 5.00 5.00 

Outside Contributions 

Anonymous 1,000.00 

Anonymous 25.00 

Miscellaneous 5.00 

Legh W. Reid 100.00 

Lydia C. Sharpless 200.00 

A. H. Wilson 25.00 1,355.00 

Total $30,286.20 



V 



52 



CONTRIBUTORS TO THE "LIBRARY ASSOCIATES " 

Mrs. William C. Alexander $2.00 

Captain A. H. Allen 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl B. AUendoerfer 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Page AUinson 5.00 

Mr. W. Disston Anderson 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Appel 20.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Manuel J. Asensio 2.00 

Mr. Herbert Otis Bailey 5.00 

Mr. Harry Norman Ball 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Seth A. Bardwell 5.00 

Mr. Robert Barrie 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Battey 5.00 

Miss Florence Beddall 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles J. Bergh 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Bleyden 2.00 

Dr. Francis J. Bonner 2.00 

Mr. Donald G. Brien 5.00 

Mr, Walter R. Brinkman 5.00 

Mrs. S. Jervis Brinton 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Briskin 2.00 

Comdr. & Mrs. H. Tatnall Brown, Jr 5.00 

Miss Caroline H. Burgess 2.00 

Mrs. Helen Cadbury Bush 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carver i 5.00 

Mrs. Richard Cary 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Aldo Caselli 2.00 

Miss Edith Chambers 2.00 

Mrs. George Hamilton Chambers 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Chandler 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George K. Chandler 2.00 

Rev. and Mrs. Rex S. Clements 5.00 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Howard Cloud 2.00 

Mrs. Wm. H. Collins 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Lynne M. Correll 2.00 

Mr. Robert Cryan 2.00 

Mr. J, P. Cunningham 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin T. Darlington 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. David 4.00 

Dr. David M. Davis 5.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Lovett Dewees 5.00 

Miss Susan J. Dewees 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. T. McK. Downs 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Drake 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Fred Driemeyer 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Evans 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. McClure Fahnestock 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Farnum 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Clifford B. Farr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Elliott Farr 5.00 

Dr. and Mrs. John B. Flick 5.00 

Mrs. Horace B. Forman 2.00 

Miss Kathryn V. Forrest 2.00 

Mr. Henry S. Eraser 5.00 

Mrs. Sara K. Fuller 2.00 

Mr. Wm. G. Gerhard 2.00 

Rev. Joseph J. Gildea 2.00 

Miss Minnie H. Goldsmith 2.00 

Forward $211.00 



53 



Forward $211.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Doioglas W. Gould 6.00 

Mrs. Joanna Betz Green 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Green 2.00 

Mr. Morris M. Green 10.00 

Miss Gladys H. Griscom 10.00 

Mr. Richard Grosholz 2.00 

Miss Gwladys R. Groskin 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John F, Gummere 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard M. Gummere 2.00 

Mrs. Edwin J. Haley 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. }. Morgan Harding 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Haslett 2.00 

Miss Ethel Hastings 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John V. Hastings, Jr 5.00 

Miss Janet Luise Hays 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard K. Henry 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Herndon 10.00 

Miss Sylvia B. Hetzel 5.00 

Mr. John B. Heyl 2.00 

Miss Margaretta S. Hinchman , 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. David Hinshaw 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison S. Hires 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence G. Hoag 10.00 

Mr. Allen F. Horton 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Orville Horwitz 2.00 

Mrs. Walter C. Janney 10.00 

Mrs. Eloise N. Jenks 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Ames Johnston 2.00 

Mr. J, Dean Joly 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Barclay Jones 5.00 

Mrs. Rufus M. Jones 2.00 

Mrs. Rayner W. Kelsey 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Albert Linton 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Lloyd 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Lober 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean P. Lockwood 2.00 

Captain Benjamin H. Lowry 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Ludlow 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Macintosh 2.00 

Mr. James P. Magill 5.00 

Miss Belle Matheson 2.00 

Mr. J. Wesley Matthews 2.00 

Miss Virginia Armitage McCall 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Meldrum 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Merrill 4.00 

Rev. S. G. Morton Montgomery 2.00 

Mr. Charles Henry Moon 2.00 

Dr. Harold H. Morris 2.00 

Mr. Elliott H. Morse 2.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Mudd 2.00 

Mr. Arthur Howell Napier 2.00 

Mr. Rudolf Neuburger 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond T. Ohl 2.00 

Mr. Nicholas Orehoff 2.00 

Miss Jessie Allen Page 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Palmer, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Arnold Post 2.00 

Miss Edith W. Powell 2.00 

Forward $424.00 



54 



Forward ■. . . $424.00 

Mrs. G. R. Rebmann 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Layton B. Register 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Legh W. Reid 4.00 

Mrs. Wm. A. Reitzel 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Rhoads 10.00 

Mr. Charles S. Ristine / 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon H. Rittenhouse 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rosengarten 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs, Winthrop Sargent, Jr 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Henry Scattergood 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucius R. Shero ; 2.00 

Miss Mary C. Smith 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Snyder 4.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Freas B. Snyder 4.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Stadie 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Thomas Steere 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan M. Steere .• 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund H. Stinnes 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Tyson Stokes 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Stuart 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis R. Taylor 5.00 

Mrs. Arthur H. Thomas 2.00 

Mrs. George Vaux, }r 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Nelson L. West 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T. West 2.00 

Mr. H. Justice Williams 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Wilson 20.00 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Wright Wilson 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wistar 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Hollingsworth Wood 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Wood 2.00 

Dr. Rachel B. Woodford 2.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Woolman 2.00 

Total $578.00 



55 



REPORT OF 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE LOAN FUND 

Established 1926 
Report No. 20 August 31, 1946 

Current Year 1945-46 

Cash Balance on hand, August 31, 1945 $ 10,427.64 

17 Loans repaid during year 2,881.50 

50 part payments on loans during year 1,993.68 

Interest received during year 375.61 

From Merion Title and Trust Co., fifth and final 5.81% payment 48.87 

15,727.30 

10 Loans made during year $ 1,768.52 

Repayment to The Corporation of Haverford College 5,000.00 6.768.52 

Cash Balance on hand August 31, 1946 8,958.78 

Loans outstanding August 31, 1946 (Exhibit 8) 9,203.00 

Interest outstanding August 31, 1946 (Exhibit 8) 560.58 

Total Resources August 31, 1946 $ 18,722.36 

Total to August 31, 1946 

Appropriations from Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 20,812.04 

1st Donation from Class of 1911 641.30 

2nd Donation from Class of 1911 137.90 

3rd Donation from Class of 1911 28.85 

Donation from Class of 1929 350.27 

Donation from A. R. Katz 500.00 

Donation from Class of 1927 900.00 

Donation from Class of 1908 1,507.96 

Gift from C. C. Norris 50.00 

Gift from John Charles 300.00 

Gift, Anonymous 500.00 

Gift, Anonymous 2,000.00 

Gift, Haverford Society of Maryland 100.00 

Gift, Dr. H. S. Arthur 300.00 

Adjustment on August 31, 1944 2.82 

325 loans repaid 47,899.93 

471 payments on loans 19,024.20 

Interest paid up 13,289.48 

Payments from Merion Title & Trust Co. - 2/28/33 $ 42.06 

1/4/38 84.12 

12/31/40 42.06 

7/22/43 42.06 

5/18/46 48.87 259.17 

From Montgomery Merryman, '33 - Interest on account, 

previously charged off 50.00 

From R. Hill, '45 - Overpayment .02 

Total Receipts 108,653.94 

Repayments to The Corporation of Haverford College $20,000.00 

Repayments of Donations 1,708.05 

Original Funds in Merion Title & Trust Co 841.18 

Check Tax 1.66 

Loans Made 77,144.27 99,695.16 

Cash Balance August 31, 1946 8,958.78 

Outstanding interest to August 31, 1946 560.58 

Outstanding loans to August 31, 1946 9,203.00 

Total Resources August 31, 1945 $18,722.36 

56 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



FUNDS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 



GENERAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1847 with subscriptions of $50,000 by a number of Friends. Addi- 
tions were made as follows: 1868, from an anonymous source, $5,000; 1869, 
bequest of Ann Haines to increase the compensation of professors, $2,670; 1870, 
bequest of Richard D. Wood, $18,682.96; 1872, from William Evans, $1,000; 
1874, from executors of Jesse George, deceased, $5,000; 1880, bequest of Dr. 
Joseph W. Taylor. $5,000: 1901. leRacy of Ann Williams. $2,425.50; 1041, 
from children of Aubrey C. Dickson in his memory, $.300. Prt-seiit hook value, 
$93,753.86. The income is used for salaries and scholarships. 

JOHN FARNUM MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1878 by the heirs of John Farnum by gift of $25,000 as a memorial 
to him. Added to in 1899 by legacy of $10,000 from Elizabeth H. Farnum, widow 
of John Farnum. Present book value, $34,481.17. The income only is to be used 
to endow a "professorship of some practical science or literature." The chair of 
chemistry was designated as the "John Farnum Professor of Chemistry." The 
principal is held in the name of three Trustees for the benefit of The Corporation 
of Haverford College. 

JOHN M. WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1880 by bequest of $10,000 from John M. Whitall, Sr. Present 
book value, $10,252.18. The bequest is upon the condition that the art of drawing, 
especially mechanical drawing, shall be taught, and the income only is to be used, 
and for this purpose. 

DAVID SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $40,000 from David Scull, Sr. Present book 
value, $43, 173.04. The income only is to be used to endow a professorship. The 
chair of biology was designated as the "David Scull Professor of Biology. 

EDWARD L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1865 by net bequest of $9,500 from Edward L. Scull, '64. The legacy 
was added to the General Endowment Fund, but in 1888 it was set apart as a 
separate fund. Present book value, $10,950.03. The income only is to be used. 
The bequest is free from any legally bmding conditions, but it was the testator's 
desire "that some judicious means shall be employed by the Managers to further 
advise students on the subjects of diet and reading." 

WISTAR MORRIS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $5,000 in bonds by Mary Morris, widow of Wistar 
Morris, as a memorial to him. Present book value, $4,956.69. There are no 
restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ISRAEL FRANKLIN WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1896 by net legacy of $9,667.83 from Israel Franklin Whitall. Pres- 
ent book value, $10,388.86. The income only is to be used for the payment of 
profr'.ssors or teachers. 



57 



JACOB P. JONES ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1897 by residuary legacy of Jacob P. Jones. This amounted when 
received to par value of $279,021.60; book value, $332,301.60, and sundry real 
estate. The real estate has all been sold, netting $847,709.92. Present book 
value, $1,2.S.^,030.25. The income only is to be used for general college purposes, 
and out of said income there shall be admitted a portion at least of the students 
either free of charge or at reduced rates. In accordance with this provision, about 
$7,500 per annum is used for scholarships, and the balance of income for general 
college purposes. Jacob P. Jones' will contains the following: "My hope is that 
under the blessing and favor of God there will come from this source a revenue 
which shall be productive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help 
at this critical period of their lives to many deserving young men of slender 
patrimony." 

JOHN FARNUM BROWN FUND FOR THE STUDY OF THE 

BIBLE, BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE, 

PHILOSOPHY, AND KINDRED SUBJECTS 

Founded in 1900 by the late T. Wistj^r Brown as a memorial to his son, John 
Farnum Brown, '93. The original gift was in cash and securities of a par value of 
$43,000, shortly afterwards increased by further gifts of $15,000. The founder 
made further gifts of cash and securities until 1915, the total, being $19,381 cash 
and $48,500 par of securities with book value of $41,490. His total gifts therefore 
had a book value of $234,970.81. Of this, $5,000 donated in 1910 is for endowment 
of prizes in Biblical History and in Philosophy. A portion of the income was 
capitalized each year to keep intact the full value of the fund until 1940 when 
this fund was included in the Consolidation of funds. Present book value, 
$26.S,841.10. The income only is to be used for the purpose of making provision 
for the regular study of the Bible and Biblical History and Literature, and as 
way opens for religious teaching. In 1910, the scope and title of the Fund were 
enlarged to include "and Philosophy and Kindred Subjects." Income up to $200 
may be used for prizes in Biblical Literature and Philosophy. 

ELLEN WALN FUND 

Founded in 1900 by legacy of $10,000 from Ellen Wain. Present book value, 
$10,711.80. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
pur{x>ses. 

CLEMENTINE COPE ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1904 by bequest of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book 
value, $20,710.06. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

NATHAN BRANSON HILL TRUST 

Founded in 1904 by deposit with First National Bank and Trust Co., Min- 
neapolis, Minn., trustee, of a paid-up life insurance policy for $5,000 by Samuel 
Hill, '78, being in memory of his father, Nathan Branson Hill. The income is to 
be used to aid in the maintenance of Haverford College so long as it shall remain 
under the auspices of the Society of Friends. In 1931, Samuel Hill died and the 
policy realized $5,039. Present book value, $5,208.91. 

JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $50,000 from Joseph E. Gillingham. Present 
book value, $40,849.10. The testator said, "I request, but I do not direct, that 
part of the income of this legacy may be used for free scholarships for meritorious 
students." In accordance with this request, $800 is appropriated annually from 
the income for scholarships, the balance being used for general college purposes. 



58 



HENRY NORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $5,000 from Henry Norris. Present book value, 
$5,671.42. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

ELIZABETH H. FARNUM FUND 

Founded in 1891. The original principal of this fund, amounting to $10,000, 
was held by the Provident Trust Q). of Philadelphia under a deed of trust created 
by Elizabeth H. Farnum of Philadelphia. The income was first paid to a life 
tenant until 1914, when income first accrued to the College "for the payment of 
the salaries of teachers and professors by the said College employed." Under 
date of Ninth Month 18, 1944, upon petition of the Trustee, concurred in by the 
College, the Court of Common Pleas awarded the principal to the Corporation 
of Haverford College "to be administered by it for the purposes set forth in the 
deed of trust in accordance with the non-profit corporation law." Present book 
value, $9,160.24. 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $10,000 from James R. Magee, '59, and added 
to in 1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1937, 1940, and 1944 by addi- 
tional payments of $29,182.84, $1,694.84, $499.31, $499.68, $488.85, $207.33, $400, 
$250, $100, $449.89, and $175.00. under his legacy. Present book value, $43,184.70. 
There are no restrictions except that the income only is to be used. This is 
applied to general college purposes, 

ALBERT K. SMILEY FUND 

Founded in 1"915 by gift of $1,000 from Daniel Smiley, '78, as a memorial to 
his brother, Albert K. Smiley, '49, and added to in 1924 and 1926. Present book 
value, $1,445.31. There are no restrictions except that preference was expressed 
that the income only should be used. This is applied to general college purposes. 

THE HINCHMAN ASTRONOMICAL FUND 

Founded in 1917 by bequest of $10,000 par value securities from Charles S. 
Hinchman. Increased in 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936 
by donations of $28,926.95 from a friend of the College. Present book value, 
$58,074.84. The income only to be used "to increase the salary of the astronomical 
professorship so as to provide a suitable instructor in the ennobling study of the 
neavens." 

WALTER D. AND EDITH M. L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1918 by bequest of Walter D. Scull, whose death followed shortly 
after the death of his sister, Edith M. L. Scull. Each left his or her estate to the 
other, unless predeceased; in this latter case both American estates were left to 
Haverford College. Both were children of Gideon D. Scull, '43, and resided in 
England. Income accumulated before the receipt of the fund by the College 
amounted to $16,887.66, of which $15,078.51 was added to the principal of the 
fund. Present book value, $168,196.24. The fund was created to establish a pro- 
fessorship of modern English constitutional history, and the chair has been 
designated as the Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professorship of History. 

ALBIN GARRETT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by lep:acy of $25,000 from Mary Hickman Garrett, in memory 
of her late husband, Albin Garret, '64. Present book value, $25,795.00. There are 
no restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ARNOLD CHASE SCATTERGOOD MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $30,000 in securities from Maria Chase Scattergood 
in memory of her son, Arnold Chase Scattergood, of the Class of 1919, who died 
in his Junior year. Present book value, $23,492.69. The income only is to be used 
toward the payment of professors' salaries. 



59 



FRANCIS B. GUMMERE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. This fund was started by a gift of $25,000 from the late Miss 
Emily H. Bourne, of New York, conditional upon the raising of $100,000 addi- 
tional for an endowment of the Chair of English Literature in memory of her 
friend, Professor Francis Barton Gummere. A committee of alumni, consisting of 
J. Stogdell Stokes, '89, chairman; E. R. Tatnall, '07, treasurer; Hans Froelicher, 
'12, secretary; Charles J. Rhoads, '93; Alfred M. Collins, '97; Winthrop Sargent, 
Jr., '08, and Parker S. Williams, '94, working with President Comfort, organized 
a comprehensive campaign among the alumni and friends of the College to raise 
$375,000 for this purpose and for increase of professors' salaries; the first $100,000 
of unspecified gifts was used to complete the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund to at least $125,000, and the balance comprised the Isaac Sharpless Memo- 
rial Fund. Total, book value, $120,991.54. 

ISAAC SHARPLESS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. The alumni of the College conducted during 1920 a campaign 
for $375,000 additional endowment for the College to make possible additional 
salaries to the professors. Appeal was made to found two new funds, the Francis B. 
Gummere Memorial Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The funds 
received, except where otherwise specified, were first applied to the completion 
of the former up to $125,000 (see above). Specified gifts and donations thereafter 
received were then applied to the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The income 
only is to be used for salaries of professors. Total book value, $210,754.11. 

GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD FUND 

The General Education Board of New York appropriated $125,000 in 1920 to 
the campaign for increase of endowment when the Francis B. Gunrmere Memorial 
Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund, totaling $375,000, were raised. In- 
terest at five per cent was paid on the full sum for three years, and the $125,000 
in full payment was completed in 1926-1927. Total book value, $121,480.36. 

HAVERFORD IMPROVEMENT FUND AND CONSOLIDATED 
CAMPUS HOUSES ACCOUNT 

Founded in 1922 to hold the Corporation's undivided share in College Lane land 
and eight houses. This property was turned over to the Corporation free of debt 
on Third Month 17, 1922, and with same the then debt of the Corporation amount- 
ing to $155,942.15 was liquidated. The fund started with an und.vided interest of 
$19,000. There was added in 1922, $9,000; and in 1925, $2,000. In 1926, $5,000 of 
this fund was sold and the proceeds were appropriated for the alterations to 
Roberts Hall. The balance of this fund, $25,000, was also used in 1927 for the 
same purpose. The income was used for general college purposes. 

The College Lane land was purchased in 1886 for the benefit of the College by 
David Scull, Justus C. Strawbridge, Richard Wood and Francis Stokes, Managers 
of the College and now all deceased. With contributions raised by them and by 
mortgages on which they went on the bonds, funds were raised to build six dwelling 
houses, and two houses were built by the Corporation itself. From the income of 
the houses the debt against the properties was gradually reduced until it was 
entirely liquidated in 1919. The net income from' 1919 until 1922, when the 
property was turned over to the Corporation, was applied toward the reduction 
of the Corporation's debt. 

As of Ninth Month 1, 1944, all of these eight College Lane houses, together 
with seven houses which had been bought for the College and formed a part of 
the College debt, and nine other Campus houses which were owned free of debt, 
were consolidated at a combined valuation of $281,331.70 into a new Campus 
Houses Account held by Consolidated Investment Account. A return at 4% 
interest is to be credited to income to the College and the balance of net income 
is to be applied in a building fund for the annual reduction of the investment, 
and/or to a depreciation reserve fund to cover extraordinary repairs. The book 
value has thus been reduced to $273,331.70. 



60 



CENTENARY FUND 

Centenary Fund (1) was founded in 1926 by gifts to the College in anticipation 
of the one hundredth anniversay of its founding in 1833. There were no restric- 
tions and the income was used for general college purposes until 1935, when the 
principal was used in the liquidation of debt. 

In 1935 a further campaign among the Alumni was conducted under the direc- 
tion of William M. Wills, '04, to add to the funds raised in commemoration of the 
Centenary. This was designated as Centenary Fund (2), but in 1935-1936 the 
payment of pledges to (1) were merged with (2) at the request of donors, and the 
two accounts are now considered as one. 

During 1936-1937, $9,000 additional donations were made by members of the 
Strawbridge family, and of these $3,372.63 were transferred for the final cost of 
the William J. Strawbridge '94 Memorial Astronomical Observatory, and $5,627,37 
were set aside to establish the Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund. Other 
additional gifts of $16,017.04 were made in 1936-1937, $7,700 in 1937-1938, $2,150 
in 1938-1939, and $15 in 1939-1940 bringing the totals contributed to both funds 
to date, for the Observatory $47,000, and for other uses $145,947.55. 

From the $16,017.04, together with $1,550 realized from a previous gift of an 
investment, the balance of the debt for pension contributions $12,022.57 was met, 
$5,544.47 was applied to the debt for accrued deficits, $7,700 was applied to the 
opt-ratiiin year 1937-1938. and $2,150 to that of 1938-1939, $15.00 to that of 
1939-1940, and $11.34 for 1940-1941, and $50 for 1943-1944. 

There remained one investment in this fund not yet realized upon with a book 
value of $231.06. At end of 1943-44 this was absorbed into Consolidated Investment 
Account, and the debt reduced further by $231.06. 

WILLIAM PENN FOUNDATION 

Started in 1926 toward a fund of $120,000 to establish a chair or lectureship in 
Political Science and International Relations. This fund forms a part of the Cen- 
tenary program to raise $1,000,000. This foundation is to be devoted, at the dis- 
cretion of the Managers, to providing adequate undergraduate instruction in the 
theory and practice of our own and other governments, in the history of past 
attempts to secure international agreements and in the methods by which good 
international understanding may be promoted and maintained. Book value to 
date, $98,346.29. 

WALTER CARROLL BRINTON MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $5,000 by the family of Walter Carroll Brinton, 
Class of 1915, who died in France Twelfth Month 8, 1918, while engaged in 
Friends' Reconstruction Work. The fund sustained the Walter Carroll Brinton 
Scholarship until 1926-1927. It was then increased $6,000 by further gifts of the 
founders, and at their request the purpose was changed from a scholarship fund 
to form a separately named fund of the William Penn Foundation, with its income 
to be used for the same objects. Present book value, $13,610.80. 

CORPORATION FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $70,000 of proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and at the southeastern corner of the College 
farm. In 1937, the fund was increased $8,810, being proceeds of the sale of 1.762 
acreas of land to the Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society for their new 
ice skating rink. Present book value, $77,093.02. The fund is invested and the 
income used for general college purposes, until otherwise directed by the Managers. 

ELLZABETH J. SHORTRIDGE FUND 

Founded in 1930 by bequest from Elizabeth J. Shortridge, without restrictions. 
The fund is invested, and until otherwise directed by the Managers, the income 
only is used for general purposes. Present book value, $9,635.43. 



61 



HOWARD COMFORT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1934 and added to in 1935, 1936, and 1937 by donations totaling 
$5,000 from President William Wistar Comfort in memory of his father, Howard 
Comfort, Class of 1870, who was a Manager from 1880 until his death in 1912, 
and Secretary of the Board of Managers from 1884 until 1908. The income only 
is to be used, and for general purposes. Present book value, $4,844.02. 

EMMA RIDGWAY COMLY FUND 

Founded 1935 by bequest of $50,000 from Emma Ridgway Comly, a Philadel- 
phia Friend. The bequest was unrestricted as to both principal and income. The 
mcome is used for general purposes. Present book value, $48,165.07. 

ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 

Founded 1935 by bequest of $20,000 and her residuary estate from Ellen W. 
Longstreth, a Friend belonging to Haverford Meeting, and living in Bryn Mawr. 
The principal and income are both unrestricted. The bequest of $20,000 and resid- 
uary $84,416.28 in 1935-36, together with further realization on residuary assets, 
viz. $3,338.69 in 1936-37, $73.33 in 1938, $166.80 in 1942-43, and $258.00 in 1943 
-44, make a total of $108,253.10. There are some participations in real estate not 
yet liquidated, which will increase or decrease this fund. The income is used for 
general purposes, with a usual allotment of $300 for Quaker books. Present book 
value, $103,435.16. 

ALBERT L. BAILY FUND 

Founded in 1936 by an unrestricted bequest of $5,000 from Albert L. Daily, 
'78. The income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4, 817. 71. 

ELIZABETH B. WISTAR WARNER FUND 

Founded First Month 16, 1937, by unrestricted bequest of $4,950 from Elizabeth 
B. Wistar Warner, of Germantown, widow of George M. Warner, '73. The income 
is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4,769.54. 

T. ALLEN HILLES BEQUEST 

Founded First Month 19, 1937, by receipt of the proceeds of a trust fund created 
in 1935 by T. Allen Hilles, class of-1870, formerly of Wilmington, Delaware, re- 
cently of Glen Mills, Pa., who died Uth Month 15, 1935. The amount received 
in stocks and cash was $285,000. Proceeds of mortgages of $7,460.94 in 1938, and 
final cash from executor in 1939 of $1,603.37 brought the gross total to $294,064.31. 
From this was deducted in 1939 the final settlement of taxes and fees totalling 
$13,300, thus making the final net bequest $280,764.31. Accumulated income of 
$12,489.7^was also received on First Month 19, 1937. In the trust created by the 
donor in 1935 he provided: "The gift to Haverford College shall constitute a fund 
to be known as 'The Hilles Bequest,' and the income shall be used for repair, up- 
keep and improvement of the building which I have given to Haverford College 
known as the Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science of Haverford College. My 
purp>ose in making this gift is primarily to relieve the Corf>oration of Haverford 
College from any additional expense on account of the erection of the building 
which I have given them, and the accompanying expansion of its educational 
activities, but whenever and if the Board of Managers or other governing body 
of the College shall determine it to be for the best interest of the College to devote 
the whole or any part of the income of the fund to uses other than those above 
specified, such income may be applied to such uses and in such manner as the 
Board of Managers or other governing body may in its absolute discretion deter- 
mine." Present book value, $270,528.30. 

LEONARD L. GREIF, JR., AND ROGER L. GREIF FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 29, 1937, by gift of $1,000 from Leonard L. Greif, '34, 
and Roger L. Greif, '37, of Baltimore. The gift was unrestricted, but the Managers 
have set aside this fund as endowment for general purposes, the income only to 
be used, until otherwise determined by them. Present book value, $963.54. 

62 



EDWARD M. WISTAR FUND 

Founded First Month 9, 1938, by gift of $2,500 from Edward M, Wistar. 72. 
for endowment, the income only to be used for general purposes. Present book 
value, $2,408.86. 

TRIANGLE SOCIETY ENDOWMENT FUND 

In 1934, the Triangle Society set up a plan of taking out insurance policies 
on the lives of some of its younger members. To date ten such policies have 
been issued, nine for $500 each and one for $1,000, with the College as beneficiary. 

The actual fund was opened in 1945-46 with $500, proceeds on the life of H. 
Conrad Atkinson, '40, who was lost in the Pacific in 1942 while serving in the 
Air Corps. Present book value, $500. 

MORRIS E. LEEDS FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 26, 1941, by gift of 400 Participating Shares of Leeds 
and Northrup Stock Trust. The fund is unrestricted as to principal and 
interest, but was ordered by the Managers, until otherwise directed, to be 
included among the funds for General Purposes, the income only to be used. 
Present book value. $39,428.52. This fund is subject to an annuity of $1600, 
during the life of its donor. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD FUND 

Founded Tenth Month, 1941, by donations totaling $1,660, made by members 
of the Board of Managers in recognition of the services for 25 years of J. Henry 
Scattergood, '96, as Treasurer of the Corporation of Haverford College. A 
further gift of $340 was made in 1943-44. 

The income of this fund is to be used in the field of International Relations 
and to be at the disposal of the President of the College and the William Penn 
Professor holding the Chair in Political Science and International Relations. 
If the income in any year is not used for the special purposes as stated, in the 
discretion of the President, it may be used for general purposes. It is further 
provided that after Tenth Month 1, 1951 the use of the fund for other purposes, 
both as to principal and income, shall be subject to the direction of the Board of 
Managers of Haverford College. Present book value, $1,979.41. 

FUxND FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL 

MOSES BROWN FUND 

A trust founded by T. Wistar Brown, in 1906, as a memorial to his father, 
Moses Brown. Transferred to the College in 1916 after his death, having at that 
time a par value of $372,821.91 and book value of $318,823.56. Present book 
value, $346,113.51. The fund was created to establish a gradtrate course in reli- 
gious study in harmony with and supplementary to the teaching and study pro- 
vided for by the John Farnum Brown Fund. The income only is to be used ; at 
least ten per cent of the total income must be capitalized each year. The unused 
income, if any, is likewise capitalized at the close of each fiscal year. The graduate 
school supported by the Moses Brown Fund was designated "The Thomas Wistar 
Brown Graduate School." In 1927 the former separate school was discontinued 
and eight graduate scholarships were created. 

In 1937-1938, arrangements were first made for cooperation in courses with 
Pendel Hill, a school for religious education under the care of Friends, located at 
Wallingford, Pa. 

FUNDS FOR INFIRMARY 

INFIRMARY ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1911 from subscriptions totaling $9,072.55, raised among alumni 
and friends of the College. Present book value, $9,301.50. The income is used 
toward the expenses of the Morris Infirmary. 

JOHN W. PINKHAM FUND 
Founded in 1911 by legacy of $5,000 from Dr. John W. Pinkham, '60, being 

63 



transmitted by gift from his widow, Cornelia F. Ptnkham. Present book value, 
$4,875.05. There are no binding conditions, but as she expressed an interest in the 
Morris Infirmary, then building, the Board of Managers directed that the income 
of this fund should be used in the support and maintenance of the Infirmary. 

FUND FOR HAVEKFORD UNION 

HAVERFORD UNION FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $1,000 par value of bond at book value of $800 and 
$678.59 cash, and all the personal property in the Union from the Haverford 
College Union. The College assumed the responsibility for the care of the building 
First Month 16, 1920. The income is used toward the maintenance of the Union 
building. Present book value, $1,810.33. 

FUNDS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

THOMAS P. COPE FUND 

Founded in 1842 by gift of sixty shares of Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co. 
stock, par value $3,000, from Thomas P. Cope. Present book value, $5,066.13. 
The income only is to be used "for the education of young men to qualify them 
to become teachers, but who are not of ability to pay their own schooling " This 
fund sustains the Thomas P. Cope Scholarships. 

EDWARD YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1860 by bequest of $5,000 from Edward Yarnall. Present book vallje, 
$5,847.96. The income only is to be used for "the support of free scholarships." 
The fund sustains the Edward Yarnall Scholarships. 

ISAIAH V. WILLIAMSON FUND 

Founded in 1876 and increased in 1883 by gifts of sundry ground rents from 
Isaiah V. Williamson. Present book value, $19,094.90. The income only is to be 
used for free scholarships. The.fund sustains the Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. 

RICHARD T. JONES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $5,000 from Jacob P. Jones as a memorial to 
his late son, Richard T. Jones, '63. Present book value, $4,871.92. The income 
only to be used to sustain the "Richard T. Jones Scholarship." 

MARY M. JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Mary M. Johnson. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $3,062.95. Present book value, 
$6,757.92. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund sus- 
tains the Mary M. Johnson Scholarships. 

SARAH MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Sarah Marshall. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $2,589.49. Present book value, 
$7,631.02. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund 
sustains the Sarah Marshall Scholarships. 

CLEMENTINE COPE FELLOWSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1899 by gift of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book value 
$22,01 2.96. The gift was to establish the "Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund to as- 
sist worthy and promising graduates of Haverford College in continuing their course 
of study at Haverford or at some other institution of learning in this country or 
abroad." The selection of the Fellows is made by the Board of Managers upon 
nomination by the Faculty. 

ISAAC THORNE JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Founded in 1916 by gift of $5,000 from Isaac Thorne Johnson, '81. Present 

64 



book value, $8,292.36. The gift was to establish "The Isaac Thome Johnson" 
Scholarship to aid and assist worthy young men of Wilmington Yearly Meeting 
or of the Central West to enjoy the privileges of Haver ford College." Unused 
income is added to the principal of the fund. 

CASPAR WISTAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of Edward M. and Margaret C. Wistar of $5,000 par 
value in bonds in memory of their son, Caspar Wistar, of the Class of 1902, who 
died in Guatemala in 1917 while engaged in mission service in that country. The in- 
come only is to be used for scholarships, primarily for sons of parents engaged in 
Christian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations, or 
students desiring preparation for similar service in America or other countries. 
Present book value, $2,843.61. 

J. KENNEDY MOORHOUSE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1926 by gifts totaling $3,000, with $1,000 added in 1926, and $1,000 
in 1928 and $1,000 in 1929 from the Class of 1900 in memory of their classmate, 
J. Kennedy Moorhouse. The scholarship provided by this fund is "to be awarded, 
whenever a vacancy shall occur, to the boy ready to enter the Freshman class, 
who in the judgment of the President of the College appears best fitted to uphold 
at Haverford the standard of character and conduct typified by J. Kennedy Moor- 
house, 1900, as known to his classmates: A man, modest, loyal, courageous, rever- 
ent without sanctimony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in clean 
and joyous living." Present book value, $4,967.88. 

LOUIS JAQUETTE PALMER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1928 by gift of $5,000 from Triangle Society, as follows: 

"The Triangle Society of Haverford College herewith presents to the Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College, a fund of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) to be here- 
after known and designated as the 'Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund'; 

"This fund represents contributions from the members of the Triangle Society 
of Haverford College who have been thus inspired to perpetuate the memory of 
their fellow member, Louis Jaquette Palmer, of the Class of 1894, one of the found- 
ers of the Triangle Society, whom they admired for his cooperative spirit and 
constructive interest in student and community welfare. The fund is placed with 
the Corporation of Haverford College with the understanding: 

"That such student shall be selected from a list of those eligible for entrance to 
Haverford College, who shall have combined in his qualifications the fulfillment 
of such conditions as apply to applicants for the Rhodes Scholarships under the 
terms of its creation, and furthermore that the student so selected and entered in 
Haverford College may continue to receive said scholarship fund throughout his 
course at College, subject to the approval of the Committee, otherwise preference 
shall be given to applications for the Freshman Class; 

"That the selection of said student and the determination of the qualities and 
conditions hereinbefore mentioned shall be subject to the decision and control of 
a committee of three (3), which committee shall be composed of two (2) members 
of the Triangle Society and the President of Haverford College, the said members 
of the Triangle Society to select and recommend the applicants and the committee 
as a whole to determine their qualifications and eligibility. 

"Finally, in the event that no student is selected by the Triangle Society or 
that a vacancy occurs, the income from said funds and any additions shall accumu- 
late as provided under the customary rules and regulations of the Corporation of 
Haverford College." 

Present book value, $4,817.71. 

PAUL W. NEWHALL MEMORLAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established in 1931 by bequest of $5,045.60 from Mary Newhall in memory 
of her father, Paul W. Newhall, a Manager, 1844-48, for the establishment of a 
scholarship fund. The income only to be used for free scholarship purposes. 
Present book value, $4,861.6.S. 



65 



R )BERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $750. $2,000 each year 1936 to 1940. and in 1942 ; 
$2,500'in 1941 ; $1,000 in 1943; $1,000 in 1944; and $2,000 in 1945; by Harry M. 
Zuckert, New York, in memory of his son, Robert Martin Zuckert, of the Class 
of 1936, who was killed in an accident in June, 1935. The income is to be used 
for scholarships and the donor said, "I should prefer a boy who is a native of 
New York or Connecticut and who now resides in one of those States." Present 
book value, $18,813.65. 

SAMUEL E. HILLES ENDOWMENT 

CREATED BY MINA COLBURN HILLES 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $5,000 from Mrs. Mina Colburn Hilles, of Orlando, 
Fla., in memory of her husband, Samuel E. Hilles, Class of 1874, formerly of 
Cincinnati, who dird in 1931. This fund was created under a trust deed with Cen- 
tral Title and Trust Co., Orlando, Fla., to whom annual reports are to be made. 
The income only is to be used for scholarships for worthy students who are un- 
able to finance their ex[>enses at Haverford College. Present book value, $4,834.39. 

CLASS OF 1913 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fourth Month 15, 1937, by gift of $3,000 from Class of 1913 for the 
endowment of scholarship aid. The income only is to be used for scholarship aid, 
to be awarded annually to a worthy student of any undergraduate class. Prefer- 
ence is to be given to sons of members of the Class of 1913 who mav apply and 
who meet the usual requirements of the College. Present book value $2,890.62. 

THE AUGUST as TABER MURRAY RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fifth Month 31, 1939 by gift from two anonymous friends of Dr. 
Augustus Taber Murray, '85; by gifts of $20,000 par value of securities subject 
to annuity during their lives, and with permission to use principal for the annuity 
payments, if necessary. 

Upon the deaths of the two annuitants, the remaining principal shall be held 
in a fund, the "Income to be used for scholarships in recognition of the scholarly 
attainments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished Alumnus of Haverford 
College, of the Class of 1885, and for many years a professor of Leland Stanford 
University, the fund to be known as 'The Augustus Taber Murray Research 
Scholarship.' Then scholarships in English literature or philology, the classics, 
German literature or philology (in order of preference) shall be awarded upon such 
terms and conditions as the College may from time to time establish to students 
who have received the bachelor's degree at Haverford College, and shall be 
awarded for the purpose of study in other institutions toward the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy or such degree as may in the future correspond to that degree." 

The amount of the Scholarship is to be $900 a year whenever awarded, and 
only unmarried students are eligible to hold it. Present book value, $22,082.29. 

THE CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Seventh Month 13, 1942 by initial gift of $2,000.00 from the Class 
of 1917, John W. Spaeth, Jr., Treasurer, as a Twenty-fifth Anniversary Gift. 
A further gift of $250.00 was made at the same time to cover the first two years 
of a scholarship of $125.00 per year. Preference is to be given to a son of a member 
of the Class of 1917. The income only is to be used for a scholarship to the extent 
of $150.00 per annum. Further contributions from the members of the Class of 
1917 are to be applied in the following order: 

(1) — To supplement the annual income from the principal sum of $2,000.00, 
so that the annual scholarship stipend shall be $150.00, or as near that sum 
as may be; 

(2) — To add to the principal sum any surplus of thes€ annual contributions 
not needed to serve the purpose of (1). Since the scholarship stipend for the years 
1942-1943 and 1943-1944 was already provided for by the additional $250.00 
already contributed by the Class of 1917, the annual contributions from the Class 
in these two years was added at once to the principal sum of $2,000.00, thus 
serving the purpo.se of (2) above. Further contributions of $500 were made in 
1944-1945 and $425 in 1945-1946. Present book value, $3,939.85. 

66 



DANIEL B. SMITH FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 6, 1943 by gift of $2,500 from Anna Wharton Wood, of 
Waltham. Mass. Thi? will be increased by a bequest of $2,500 made by Miss Esther 
Morton Smith, of Germantown. Philadelnhia, who died Third Month 18. 1942. 

This fund is established by the granddaughters of Daniel B. Smith "in loving 
memory of their grandfather and his intimate association with the early years of 
the College." 

The income is to be used, in the discretion of the Faculty, as an annual scholar- 
ship for some young man needing financial aid in his College course. Preference 
is to be given to a descendant of their father, Benjamin R. Smith, if any such 
should apply. Present book value, $5,000.00. 



SARAH TATUM HILLES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Founded Eleventh Month 1, 1943 by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. Hilles 
1888, in memory of his mother "Sarah Tatum Hilles." 

The will directs that the income be used "to provide for such number of annual 
scholarships of $250 each as such income shall be sufficient to create" ; they are 
to be awarded by the Managers upon "needy and deserving students," and to be 
known as "Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships." 

It is estimated that twelve scholars can be thus provided for at present. Present 
book value $75,534.58. 



ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established Second Month 2, 1944 by gift of $200 from Mrs. Elihu Grant to 
supplement the simultaneous transfer of $803.73 to this new fund from Donations 
Account, being the balance of Donations made by Dr. Grant during his lifetime 
to the Beth Shemesh account, and $75.00 realized from the sale of some of his books. 
Mrs. Grant has made a further gift of $1,000 in 1943-44 and $2,000 in 1944-1945. 
And, Grant Foundation, Inc., gave $10,000, also in 1944-45. Mrs. Grant made 
a further gift of $1,000 in 1945-46. 

With the donor's approval, the terms of the fund are as follows: 
"Founded in 1944 to commemorate the service to Haverford College of Dr. 
Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938, a member of the College faculty. The income from 
this fund is applied to scholarship assistance to students in the Humanities, pri- 
marily these specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental subjects, 
and is limited to those whose major subject has been approved by the College 
faculty. In special circumstances the income may be utilized to assist those working 
for a post-graduate degree at Haverford College." 

If conditions change, the Managers are given power to change the use of the 
fund. Present book value, $15,078.73. 

CHRISTIAN FEBIGER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
(This fund is new this year) 

Founded Sixth Month 13, 1946 by a gift of $8,000.00 from Madeleine Seabury 
Febiger, of Philadelphia, in memory of her husband. Christian Febiger, Class 
of 1900. 

The income only is to be used in paying the tuition or other college expenses 
of worthy, needy students at Haverford College. 



67 



FUNDS FOR THE LIBRARY 
ALUMNI LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1863 by contributions from the alumni and other friends of the 
College. In 1909 the unexpended balance (about $5,000) of a fund of $10,000 
raised in 1892, and known as the "New Library Fund," was merged into the 
Alumni Library Fund. Present book value, $16,799.42. The income is used for 
binding and miscellaneous expenses of the Library. 

MARY FARNUM BROWN LIBRARY FUND 

'Founded in 1892 by gift of $20,000 from T. Wistar Brown, executor of the 
Estate of Mary Farnum Brown. Additions were made by T. Wistar Brown in 
1894, $10,000 for a lecture fund, and in 1913, $20,000. In 1916, after T. Wistar 
Brown's death, there was added to this fund $34,499.78 par value of securities, 
book value, $30,149.78, being a trust which he had created for this purpose in 
1908 and to wliich he had made additions in subsequent years. Present book value, 
$65,367.68. The purpose of this fund (except $10,000) is for the increase and 
extension of the Library. The income only is to be used for the purchase of books, 
and one-fifth of same is to be spent for books promoting the increase of Qiristian 
knowledge. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. The income of $10,000 of the fund is to provide for an annual 
course of lectures upon Biblical subjects designated "The Haverford Library 
Lectures." Unused income from the fund, if any, must be capitalized at the end 
of each fiscal year. 

WILLIAM H. JENKS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1910 by gift of $5,000 from Hannah M. Jenks, widow of William 
H. Jenks. The fund was first known as "Special Library Fund," but after the death 
of Hannah M. Jenks was changed, in 1916, to "William H. Jenks Library Fund." 
Present book value, $4,817.71. The purpose of this fund is that the income shall 
be used for the care of the collection of Friends' books made by William H. Jenks 
and given by his widow to Haverford College, and to make appropriated additions 
thereto. Any income not used for these purposes may be used toward the general 
needs of the Library. 



MARY WISTAR BROWN WILLIAMS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1914 by gift of $20,000 from Parker S. Williams, '94, as a memorial 
to his late wife, Mary Wistar Brown Williams. Present book value, $19,566.40. 
The income only is to be used for the purchase of books for the Library, preferably 
books coming within the classes of history, poetry, art, and English and French 
literature. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. 



ANNA YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1916 by residuary bequest of $13,000 par value of securities with 
book value of $7,110, and one-half interest in suburban real estate from Anna 
Yarnall. Additional amount under bequest was received in 1918. Present book 
value, $166.84234. The real estate was sold in 1923 and netted the College 
$164,820.50. The bequest was made for the general use of the Library. The 
Testatrix says, "I do not wish to restrict the managers as to the particular applica- 
tion of this fund, but desire them to use the income arising from it as in their 
best judgment and discretion shall seem best, for the purchase of books and manu- 
scripts, book cases, rebinding of books, and, if need be, the principal or portions 
thereof, or the income or portions thereof, for additions to the present Library 
building, or the erection of new Library buildings. I direct that all books pur- 
chased with this fund shall be plainly marked 'Charles Yarnall Memorial in 
memory of my father, Charles Yarnall." 

68 



F. B. GUMMERE LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $635.47, raised among the students by the Students, 
Association of the College as a memorial to Professor Francis Barton Gummere. 
The income only is to be used to buy for the Haverford College Library books on 
the subjects that he taught or was interested in. 

The student's Association voted also to raise twenty-five dollars for a special 
shelf in the Library to be known as the "F. B. Gummere Memorial Shelf." This 
shelf, with its proper inscription, holds the books purchased by this fund. Present 
book value, $612.30. 



EDMUND MORRIS FERGUSSON, JR., CLASS OF 1920 MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by memorial gift of $1,000 from the family of Edmund Morris 
Fergusson, Jr., Class of 1920, who died at the College in his Senior year. The in- 
come only is to be used for the maintenance and increase of the Library's Depart- 
ment of English and American Literature. The books purchased with the income 
of this fund are marked by a special book-plate indicating its source. Present book 
value. $965.80. 



CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 15, 1938, by gifts totaling $5,250 from members and 
families of the Class of 1888, on the occasion of their fiftieth anniversary. The con- 
ditions of the gift are as follows: 

(1) A fund is to be established, to be known as "THE CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY 
FUND." 

(2) The income only of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of books 
for the Haverford College Library, except as noted below (in Clause 6). 

(3) The fund established now will be added to later by gift or bequest. 

(4) Members of the Class also expect to donate books to the Library, with the 
understanding that when such books are duplicates of books already in the 
Library, they may be exchanged for books needed, or sold, and the money 
so obtained used in the same way as the income of the fund. 

(5) All books purchased by the income of the fund (or obtained as in 4) are to 
be provided with a special book-plate to be furnished by the Class. 

(6) Income from the Class Fund or moneys obtained by sale of duplicate books 
may, when necessary, be used for binding or repair of books designated as 
belonging to the Class collection. Additional donations were made as follows: 
$500 in 1939-40; $100 in 1943-44; $500 in 1944-45 and $200 in 1945-46. 
Present book value $6,341.02. 

CLASS OF 1918 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Third Month 24, 1938 by gift from the Class of 1918 in commemora- 
tion of their twentieth anniversity. The gift was $1,753.52 of which $500 was spent 
for a portrait of the late Rayner W. Kfelsey, Professor of History, who died Tenth 
Month 29, 1934; and the balance of $1,253.52 was used in establishing a new Li- 
brary Fund, the income to be used for books. Present book value, $1,207.83. 



FUNDS FOR PENSIONS 

PRESIDENT SHARPLESS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by contributions from interested friends of the College, finally 
amounting to $40,000. Present book value, $39,733.67. The income is to be used, 
for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President of the Col- 
lege and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may decide. 
The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in said 
fund. 



69 



WILLIAM P. HENSZEY FUND 

Founded in 1908 by gift of $10,000 from William P. Hens2ey, donated in con- 
nection with the raising of the President Sharpless Fund, but kept as a separate 
fund. Increased in 1909 by legacy of $25,000 from William P. Henszey. Present 
book value, $35,418.53. The income is to be used, as in the President Sharpless 
Fund, for the teachers and professors of HaverfOrd College as the President of the 
College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may de- 
cide. The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College 
Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized 
in said fund. 

JACOB P. JONES BENEFIT FUND 

Founded in 1909 and increased in 1910 by proceeds of land sold for account of 
Jacob P. Jones legacy. Present book value, $65,630.50. The income is to be used, 
as in the President Sharpless Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford 
College as the President of the College and his successors, with the approval of 
the Board of Managers, may decide. The income from this fund is annually trans- 
ferred to the Haverford College Pensioh Fund for old style pensions, or, if not 
needed for pensions, is capitalized in said fund. 

PLINY EARLE CHASE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1909 by transfer to the College of a fund raised in 1887 in memory 
of Professor Pliny E^rle Chase, and amounting to par value of $4,173.04. Present 
book value, $3,152.93. The income of this fund is used, as in the President Sharp- 
less Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President 
of the College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, 
may decide. This income is transferred annually to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund, for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in 
said fund. 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE PENSION FXTND 

Founded in 1920 and added to since, being accumulations of income from the 
President Sharpless Fund, the William P. Henszey Fund, the Jacob P. Jones 
Benefit Fund and the Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund, not needed for pensions. 
Present book value, $107,955.98. The income from this fund, together with the 
income from the four above-mentioned funds, is used for old style pensions. In- 
come not needed for pensions was capitalized until 1932; then any unused income 
was used toward the College's share m cost of new contributory pensions with the 
Teachers' Annuity and Insurance Association. Now the old style pensions call 
for more than the income of all these Pension Funds. When the proper time comes 
in an actuarial sense, the principal of this fund can be used as well as the income for 
the old style pensions until they cease. 

FUNDS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 

THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Founded in 1904 by gift of $5,000 from the late Samuel R. Shipley as a memorial 
to his father, Thomas Shipley. Present book value, $5,056.68. The income onlv 
to be used for lectures on English Literature at the College. In case of actual need, 
at the discretion of the President of the College, the income can be used for general 
expenditures. 

ELLISTON P. MORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1906 by gift of $1,000 from Elliston P. Morris, '48. Present book 
value, $1,085.68. The incon\e is to be used as a prize for essays to be written b^ 
students on the subject of Arbitration and Peace. "The Elliston P. Morris Prize ' 
of $40 is given in each year, the competition being open to all undergraduates 
and to graduates o. not more than three years' standing. 

In 1929, it was determined, with the consent of the family of Elliston P. Morris, 
that when the prize is not awarded the income may be used for the purchase of 
library books on arbitration and peace. 

70 



JOHN B. GARRETT READING PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1908 by a gift of $2,000 par value of bonds by the late John B. 
Garrett, '54. It was the purpose of the donor to ensure the permanence of a prize 
or prizes for Systematic Reading, which he had given for a number of years. The 
prizes were not awarded from 1922 to 1939 on account of default of the bonds. 
Reorganization has resulted in 1939 in sufficient recovery of value to provide 
again for this prize. Present book value $2,189.40. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1909 by gift of $12,000 par value of bonds, book value $11,800, 
from an anonymous donor. Present book value, $8,890.67. The income only of 
this fund to be used "to furnish opportunity for study of social and economic and 
religious conditions and duties connected therewith, especially from a Chris- 
tian p>oint of view." The income is used toward the expenses of Summer Schools for 
Religious Study, which have been held at Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges 
from time to time, and also for religious education under Friends' care. 

On Fifth Month 16, 1930, the Managers adopted the following amendment, 
made at the suggestion of the donor, now revealed to be John Thompson Emlen, 
1900: "If, however, it shall in the course of time be deemed advisable by the Presi- 
dent and the Managers that the income of this fund can be used more profitably 
by the College for other purposes than those herewith stated, it is my desire that 
they shall act in accordance with their judgment." 



SCHOLARSHIP IMPROVEMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1913 by gift of $2,000 par value of bonds, book value, $1,200, from 
John L. Scull, '05. Present book value, $2,213.14. The income only to be used to 
establish two prizes of $50 and $45 annually to the two students in the graduating 
class showing the most marked and steady improvement in scholarship during 
their college course. 



ELIZABETH P. SMITH FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $1,000 from Elizabeth P. Smith. Present book 
value, $1,680.48. The income only to be used as a prize for the best essays on 
Peace written by students of the College. 



S. P. LIPPINCOTT HISTORY PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1917 by gift of $2,500 par value of bonds, book value, $2,546.88, 
from beneficiary of the estate of S. P. Lippincott, '86. Present book value, 
$2,454.02. The income only to be used as an annual history prize, which is 
designated "The S. P. Lippincott History Prize." The award is to be made 
on the basis of a competitive essay. In any year when no award is made, the 
income is to be used for the purchase of library books in the field of the 
unawarded prize. 

FRANCIS STOKES FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $5,000 in securities, book value, $5,000, from 
Francis J. Stokes, '94, in memory of his father, Francis Stokes, of the Class of 
1852, and a Manager of Haverford from 1885 until his death in 1916. Present 
book value, $4,933.63. The income is to be used for extending the planting of 
trees and shrubs on the College grounds. The wish is expressed, but not as a bmd- 
ing condition of the gift, that the Campus Club should have the direction of the 
expenditure of this income. 



71 



GEORGE PEIRCE PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $600, and increased in 1920 by further gift of $400, 
from Harold and Charlotte C. Peirce in memory of their deceased son, George 
Peirce, '03. Present book value $2,421.30. The income only is to be used for a 
prize, to be called the George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics, to the 
student who, m the opinion of the Faculty, has shown marked proficiency in 
either or m both of these studies and who wishes to follow a profession which 
calls for such preparation. Unused income is capitalized, as requested by the 
founders of the fund. 

LYMAN BEECHER HALL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1924 by donation of securities of par value, $2,000, book value, 
$1,820, from the Class of 1898 in commemoration of their 25th anniversary of 
graduation to establish an annual prize of $100 in Chemistry in honor of Doctor 
nJ"!?^^ Beecher Hall, Professor of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 
1917. Present book value, $2,076 A^. 

NEWTON PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1925 by donation of five shares of General Electric Co. stock by A. 
Edward Newton, par value, $500, and book value, $1,348.25. Present book value, 
$1,346.70. The income only is to be used for "The Newton Prize in English Litera- 
ture to the undergraduate who shall submit the best essay on some subject con- 
nected with English literature." In 1930, the award was changed to be on the basis 
of Final Honors, and in any year when no award is made the income is to be used 
for the purchase of library books in the field of the unawarded prize. 

EDWARD B. CONKLIN ATHELTIC FUND 

Founded in 1925 and added to in 1926, 1927 and 1929 by Frank H. Conklin, 
'95, in memory of his brother, Edward B. Conklin, '99. Present book value, 
$2,312.51. The income is to be used without restriction in any branch of athletics 

ARBORETUM FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $5,000 from proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and southeast corner of the College farm. Until 
otherwise ordered by the Managers, the fund is to be invested and the income only 
is to be used under the direction of the Campus Club for trees and shrubs uf>on 
the College grounds, or for their care, or for other similar purposes. Present book 
value, $4,420.49. 

WILLIAM ELLIS SCULL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1929 by William Ellis Scull, '83, by a gift of $2,000. The income is 
to be used annually, so long as the Managers may judge expedient, as a prize to 
be awarded at Commencement by the Faculty to that upper classman who in 
their judgment shall have shown the greatest improvement in voice and the articu- 
lation of the English Language. The prize is to be known as "The William Ellis 
Scull Prize," Present book value, $1,027.09. 

C. WHARTON STORK ART FUND 

In First Month, 1930, C. Wharton Stork, of Class of 1902, donated to the 
Corporation securities of a then value of $60,000 on account of a contemplated 
gift for the purpose of erecting, equipping, and furni.shing an Art Museum at the 
College. Purchases were made by C. Wharton Stork of paintings, which are hung 
in the Library. This fund is to be liquidated and is not included in the total 
of the funds. 



72 



PAUL D. I. MAIER FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 7, 1936, b> bequest of $1,000 from Paul D. I. Maier, 
'96, of Byrn Mawr, Pa. The bequest provides for the continuance of the Class 
of 1896 Prizes of $10 each in Latin and Mathematics, and any balance of income 
is to be used for general purposes. Present book value, $963.54. 

STRAWBRIDGE OBSERVATORY MAINTENANCE FUND 

Founded Second Month 13, 1937, from donations of $5,627.37 from members of 
the Strawbridge family, being the amount in excess of the actual cost of the re- 
building and reequipment of the William J. Strawbridge, '94, Memorial Astronom- 
ical Observatory. The income is used for the maintenance and equipment of 
the observatory. The principal can be used for additional equipment, if so deter- 
mined by the Board of Managers. In 1938 and 1939 an astrographic camera was 
so purchased at a cost of $1,787.83. Present book value $3,699.55. 

JACOB AND EUGENIE BUCKY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 

Founded Sixth Month 4, 1942 by gift of $2,000.00 from Colonial Trust Com- 
pany of New York and Solomon L. Fridenberg of Philadelphia, co-trustees under 
the will of Eugenie Bucky, deceased (late of New York), the income only to be 
used. At the same time accumulated income of $2,000.00 was also donated as 
Bucky Foundation Gift, this amount to be available for use for the same pur- 
poses as the income of the Foundation. Extracts from Mrs. Bucky 's will and 
codicils in reference to the purposes of the Bucky Foundation are here made 
as follows: 

"The purpose or object of such a Foundation or Fund is and shall be for the 
encouragement of them who seek new truths, and who endeavor to free and clear 
from mystery and confusion our knowledge concerning God'; and thereby to 
enforce more effectively the common laws of mutual love and obligation, peace 
and goodwill, between and among our several creeds, races, nations, and markets.* 

"My aim, intention, purpose and object is to help in promoting piety among 
men, enlightening their ignorance and bettering their condition, by making more 
and more extensive and by spreading among the public at large not only the 
preaching but also the practicing of the words of the . . . American motto 'In 
God We Trust' and of the . . . Preamble to the Constitution for the United States 
of America. I believe and therefore I aim, intend and purpose that the uplifting 
of men, women and children to the standard of life taught in the Scriptures and 
the Constitution for the United States of America is indeed the work of Charity, 
dispels ignorance, inculcates generous and patriotic sentiments, and fits the 
public groups and the individual men or women for their good usefulness in the 
American Commonwealth." 

1. Associated with the American motto "In God We Trust." 

2. Associated with the Preamble of the Constitution for the United States of 
America — "to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic 
tranquility, provide the common defense, promote the public welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity." 

In 1945-1946 a further gift of $1,000 from the Trustees was added to the 
fund. Unused income, if any, has also been capitalized. Present book value, 

$3,334.45. 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded May 20, 1943 from gifts totaling $900.00 of members of the Mathe- 
matics faculty and others. A further gift of $125 was made in 1943-44. The unused 
income is added to principal. This capitalized the annual prizes that had been 
given by the Mathematics professors for many years. 

The Mathematics Department Prizes for freshmen, $25.00, are awarded annu- 
ally, in competition, by examination. Present book value, $1,118.82. 



73 



WILLIAM T. ELKINTON FUND 



Founded Ninth Month 6, 1944, by bequest from William T. Elkinton, of Phila- 
delphia, arising from a Trust set up by him during his lifetime. The principal 
was $2,491.50 and income received, $11.11, a total of $2,502.61. After the death of 
a life beneficiary, the Trust provided: "to pay over, assign and transfer one of 
said equal parts unto the Corporation of Haver ford College (a corporation of 
the State of Pennsylvania) ; the principal fund thus passing to said Corporation 
to constitute a part of such endowment as may be established at Haverford CoU 
lege as a fitting memorial of Friends' relief work abroad, which memorial 
'should foster the peaceful relations of the United States with foreign countries 
by acquainting our youth with the principles of European governments and with 
international problems': provided however, that if no such Endowment should 
be established at Haverford College prior to the expiration of one year after the 
principal of the Fund hereby conveyed becomes distributable under the provisions 
of this deed, the said one-third part of the fund hereby conveyed shall be devoted 
by the Corporation of Haverford College for such other purpose as the Trustees 
acting hereunder, their survivor or successor, shall designate, preferably for the 
furtherance of education in some form at Haverford College or for providing 
assistance in the form of scholarships to promote education." 

In accordance with a suggestion from President Morley, concurred in by 
Thomas W. Elkinton representing the Trustees, the Managers voted on Ninth 
Month 22, 1944, that "the income until otherwise directed, is to be used for 
traveling and other expenses in the attendance at intercollegiate conferences for 
discussion of international problems by representatives of the International 
Relations Club at Haverford." The Trustee further stated "as long as the 
activities of the Club are closely related to 'acquainting our youth with the prin- 
ciples of European governments and with international problems,' the use of the 
income by the Club would be satisfactory." 

TILNEY MEMORIAL FUND 



Founded in First Month, 1945, by gifts totalling $2,000 by I. Sheldon Tilney, 
1903, in memory of his parents, John S. and Georgiana E. Tilney. The income 
is to be used "to try to influence the student body towards a more religious view- 
point of life." Permission was also granted by the donor that "the income may 
be used also in connection with a scholarship for students in the field of Philos- 
ophy or Biblical Literature." 

In 1945-1946 the fund was increased to $5,000, by gifts of $1,000 from Georgi- 
ana S. Kirkbride and $2,000 from Robert W. Tilney, sister and brother of 
I. Sheldon Tilne. Present book value, $5,000. 



CLASS OF 1902 LATIN PRIZE FUND 



Founded Second Month 2, 1945, by gift from Class of 1902 of $142.90, being 
proceeds of sale of security formerly purchased and held by the Gass to per- 
petuate a Latin Prize of $10 annually at Haverford. The Class had donated 
the income for this prize since 1913. An unused balance of $39.00 of such dona- 
tions was transferred to the income account of this fund. 



74 



STATED MEETINGS OF THE CORPOKATTOX 
AND THE MANAGERS 

The Annual Meeting of "The Corporation of Haverfard College" 
is held on the second Third-day in the Tenth Month, at 3 o'clock r.M. 



The Stated Meetings of the Managers for 1944-45 will be held 
on the second Sixth-day of First and Third Months, and on the third 
Sixth-day of Fifth, Ninth and Eleventh months. 



LEGACIES 

The friends of the College, including former students, and all who 
are interested in the promotion of sound learning, are invited to 
consider the College in the disposition of their estates by will. 



FORM OF BEQUEST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 

/ give and bequeath, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto the Corporation of Haverfard College, the sum of 

Dollars. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

/ give and devise, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto The Corporation of Haverford College, its Suc- 
cessors and Assigns, in fee, the following described real estate: (Here 
describe the real estate.) 



75